Fit For Life

“Fit For Life” began as a diet book written by Havey and Marylin Daimond and was originally published in 1985. The book became a national best seller, and recently spawned an entire website that offers educational materials, dietary supplements, and a College of Natural Health.

The Premise: The premise of the book is that the key to losing weight is in the combinations of food eaten, not necessarily what is eaten. The primary philosophy is to eat more “live” foods, like vegetables and salads, than “dead” foods, like protein and starches.

The Diet: The original book recommends tons of fruits and vegetables, but the difference is in the combinations. Fruits, according to the diet, should not be eaten with anything else. The book also states that if following the diet properly, proteins and starches should not be eaten together. Portion control is not a part of this plan. While this plan focuses heavily on a large intake of fruits and vegetables, particularly prior to noon, it is not clear on the type of proteins or starches that are appropriate. The key to weight loss is the simple match of calories in versus calories out. 

The book has spawned an entire Fit For Life lifestyle that now has 4 different programs.  The Fit For Life website outlines the plans, which include a detailed analysis of your body to determine what will work best for you in terms of food and exercise.  The foods include “A+ foods” that can enhance your hormonal and immunity systems, and “free foods” that a person can eat all day.  The plans include detailed menus, but no pre-packaged food is necessary to purchase on this program.  This plan also promotes “freebie Friday,” where a person can eat whatever they want regardless of the plan’s recommendations.

What to get excited over:
The diet offers a “freebie Friday.” Also, menu plans are included when you sign up for the diet on the website, which takes the guesswork out of meal planning.

Things to consider:
If you’re following the diet based on the book, there aren’t enough specifics, and you could end up eating too little to be healthy. Also, if you go through the website, the diet is very customized, and therefore can be tough to follow if you have a family to cook for.

Verdict:  Not recommended. This diet is too vague to follow if you go by the book and not very convenient if you go through the website. There are several more well-rounded diets that are easier to adapt to than the Fit for Life diet.

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  • Robin Godnick

    I think this is one of the best books I have ever read. Had I committed to the principles taught in their books I would not have Diabetes II right now. I recently read the third book and all of the physiology makes better sense than any information I have received from the M.D.s or the Diabetic Educators. I think there are many copycats such as Suzanne Somers and many others who basically stole the Diamond’s ideas and have made some money off of them. The Diamonds sincerely were are in it to help others.
    I am on a 30 day raw foods only plan without using insulin or Janumet and I am experiencing high sugar readings that are beginning to go down. I am getting used to this and anything else feels heavy, but the good thing about the Diamond’s plan is that I can add in steamed vegetables and some cooked veggies and can have a piece of meat or a potato at dinner eventually. It really makes sense and I have read and re-read but never fully put it into practice until now. I fully expect to be free of any diabetic meds following Fit for Life principles!
    Thanks Marilyn and Harvey, you are the pioneers and have not been given enough credit for what you have done! Sincerely, Robin Godnick

  • Robin Godnick

    I think this is one of the best books I have ever read. Had I committed to the principles taught in their books I would not have Diabetes II right now. I recently read the third book and all of the physiology makes better sense than any information I have received from the M.D.s or the Diabetic Educators. I think there are many copycats such as Suzanne Somers and many others who basically stole the Diamond’s ideas and have made some money off of them. The Diamonds sincerely were are in it to help others.
    I am on a 30 day raw foods only plan without using insulin or Janumet and I am experiencing high sugar readings that are beginning to go down. I am getting used to this and anything else feels heavy, but the good thing about the Diamond’s plan is that I can add in steamed vegetables and some cooked veggies and can have a piece of meat or a potato at dinner eventually. It really makes sense and I have read and re-read but never fully put it into practice until now. I fully expect to be free of any diabetic meds following these principles!
    Thanks Marilyn and Harvey, you are the pioneers and have not been given enough credit for what you have done! Sincerely, Robin Godnick