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Old 04-13-2005, 06:13 PM   #16  
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Back from the dermatologist. He says I have keratosis pilaris. Its a genetic follicular condition. I'm going to thank my mom again for all these weird things that happen. Anyhow I get to use a really pricey skin lotion ($33/bottle). The pharmacy had to order it so it'll be in tomorrow. As long as this itching stops and these bumps aren't so bad. He says it'll never go away totally but I can get some relief with treatment. If this lotion doesn't work...I get to go back. I read up on it and sometimes they have to use antibiotics too. Oh well....

Back to the laundry monsters...


~chris
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Old 04-13-2005, 07:35 PM   #17  
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Angel- My sister has had lupas now in remission.. She went to a support group meetings for years.. Maybe you can find one.It seems like a lot is piling up on your plate..Sometimes support groups can help,but, then again if there are a bunch of whinners there they can do more harm than good. Why don't you consult with the medical group you go to and have them advise you.
Chrily- I hope the medication for your skin helps..I have little bumps on my face that get sore sometimes. I use peroxide on them. I also use Clinic's products. They are pure and have no perfumes in them..Their cleansing routine is one of the best that I have found. I was at their counter today. It is Bonus week at Dillards here in Fl.
Today...Breakfast- Kashi cereal 1c, 1/2 banana,strawberries, 1/2 c skim milk
Lunch- SUBWAYS grilled chicken salad, lemon juice for dressing
Dinner- Salad mixed veggies, chicken, red wine vinager and olive oil dressing

Ok girls, don't concentrate too hard on what you may eat out..Make up your mind that there are certain things you are not going to eat. So what if someone doesn't like it!!You are taking care of yourself..Bye till tomorrow.. Have a good day...Joanne
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Old 04-14-2005, 12:41 PM   #18  
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Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Tied to Skin Problems ProHealthNetwork.com

04-11-2005

Study Links Humira, Remicade, and Enbrel to Skin Conditions
By Miranda Hitti
WebMD Medical News
Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD on Monday, April 04, 2005

April 4, 2005 -- Dutch researchers have linked a group of rheumatoid arthritis drugs to skin problems. Humira (adalimumab), Remicade (infliximab), and Enbrel (etanercept) are mentioned in the study, which appears in the journal Arthritis Research and Therapy.

All of those medications are biologic treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). They are a new type of treatment approach that inhibits TNF, a chemical made by the body to induce inflammation. These chemical substances lead to joint inflammation seen in RA.

The study "shows that dermatological conditions are a significant and clinically important problem in RA patients receiving TNF-alpha-blocking therapy," write the researchers.

Out of 289 RA patients taking biologic agents, 72 (25%) consulted a dermatologist about skin problems over an average of two years. In comparison, in a group of RA patients who had never received these drugs, 37 (13%) consulted a dermatologist. The comparison group tended to have less severe cases of RA, say the researchers.

Most Common Problems

There were a total of 128 skin problems among the 72 patients taking biologic agents who had consulted a dermatologist. Their most common conditions were skin infections (33 cases), eczema (20 cases), and drug-related skin eruptions (15 cases). None required hospitalization but seven patients decided to stop taking the drugs because of skin problems.

The number of skin problems reported during or after treatment was 56 for Humira, 49 for Remicade, and 16 for Enbrel, write the researchers, who included Marcel Flendrie of Radboud University Njimegen Medical Centre in the Netherlands. Most of the skin eruptions occurred in the first five months of treatment with the biologic agents and were caused by all of the drugs, the researchers report. Reports of skin problems had surfaced in study trials of the drugs but this is the first large study that tracked problems as they unfolded, say Flendrie and colleagues.

Who Took What Drugs

The group included 70 patients who were taking more than one TNF blocker. Eight patients took more than two anti-TNF drugs, say researchers. Humira was taken by 108 patients, Remicade by 167, and Enbrel by 78 people.

"Based on the information in the article, we really can't address [the study]," says Candace Steele, director of global public relations for Wyeth Pharmaeuticals, which markets Enbrel in the U.S. together with the drug company Amgen.

"I can tell you that we have seen dermatological effects with some patients who've used Enbrel," says Steele. "Essentially, if a physician were to contact us about dermatological effects, we have standard information [stating that] skin rash has been described in clinical trials, postmarketing experience, and literature reports." Patients should report any skin conditions to their doctors, she adds.

"Injection site reaction is a possible side effect that's listed in our label. In fact, it's in the label of all TNF inhibitors," says Jim Bozikis, manager of pharmaceutical public affairs for Abbott Laboratories, which makes Humira.

"Our experience with RA patients and Humira is that when side effects do occur, they're so mild that patients choose to continue therapy because the benefits greatly outweigh any side effects," he says. "In general, with anti-TNF therapy, patients are more susceptible to infection and the key is for patients to work closely with their physicians and carefully monitor their progress," says Bozikis.

Source: WebMD (online at www.my.webmd.com)

ARTICLE SOURCES: Flendrie, M. Arthritis Research and Therapy, April 3, 2005. News release, BioMed Central. Candace Steele, director, global public relations, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals. Jim Bozikis, manager, pharmaceutical public affairs, Abbott Laboratories.

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Old 04-14-2005, 12:47 PM   #19  
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Hi. Back from helping my aunt pack. I did get to visit with two of my GF while I was away as well.

Didn't do too badly with eating at all. Stayed on my diet. Just so frustrating because I have only lost 1/2 pound. This makes me crazy, but I guess if I stick with it, it will eventually LEAVE - I HOPE!!! anyway, feel a lot less sore without sugar.

Will be back later to post my menu for the day.

No Barb, we don't want you to post the yogurt and three cookies you had for breakfast

Chris - glad you found out what the skin thing was.

Joanne - you are a dynamo!!

Angel - I'm sorry about the diagnoses of Lupus and FM. Just more of the same darn pain, although I think Lupus carries some other stuff with it as well. The thing with FM is the fatigue for me, more than the pain. I can deal with that, but not the darn fatigue.

Will be back later.
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Old 04-14-2005, 07:22 PM   #20  
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Hi everyone,
Good to hear from you Happy Canuk.
I guess I forgot you were going to go help your aunt pack. I was getting concerned about you.
Thanks for the info. My Dr talked with me about the possible dangers & side effects of Remicade before I started on it. I just have to decide which is worse, I suppose. So far, after almost 3 yrs of Remicade, I haven't had any side effects. The Methotrexate is a different story, though. I know I need it, but I hate it, & wish I could get off of it, because of that. The Dr says he's afraid for me to take the Remicade without it, though, because I'm so sensitive.
I know what you mean about the fatigue. That's why I knew something else was going on. I've had problems with it before, but, the last few months I have to force myself out of bed, out of a chair, or to do anything at all! I'm just fatigued to the point of not even knowing how to explain it, especially to my family. Sometimes I think I should just go away somewhere & live alone, so I won't be a bother to anyone. I suppose that's just part of the depression, or whatever, that goes along with it. I'm mostly sick & tired of being sick & tired!

Joanne...support groups sound nice...but, I don't have time, or the strength, to be truthful. I'm getting afraid that the fatigue will start being a problem for me to go to the station. (& I love it so well) As soon as I can, I have to get back home, while I have the strength. I have a feeling there's no meds for that. Being off the sugar has helped with a few things, though. I seem to be feeling better in other ways, & not hurting so much. Yes, I know Lupus isn't supppose to be what it use to be, but still dangerous. I had a friend at the station that had Lupus, & died a couple of years ago (younger than I am). Her lungs crystalized. Death isn't caused by RA or Lupus, but by complications caused from them.

Chrily...I'm sorry about your skin condition. You have enough to contend with, without more going on. I think about you a lot. The Methotrexate breaks me out in a rash & itches, so I know a little what you're talking about, but sure your situation is quite a bit worse. Don't worry about me, like I said it's mostly the fatigue.

Hello Wifie & ageoldie...hope you're feeling well today.

Breakfast: Coffee, 3 sugar-free cookies
Lunch: 1 Lean Pocket & Diet Sprite
Snack: Strawberries & sugar-free whip cream
Supper: A spoon of white beans, very small piece of steak, water
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Old 04-15-2005, 12:32 AM   #21  
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Evening...almost bedtime for me really. I am so tired. I'll post my menu tomorrow. I just don't have enough energy to do it tonight.

Charlotte-Are you feeling any better? I was going to ask too-How do they test for fibromyalgia? I was curious after reading your post about being extremely fatigued. I have been that way for a few weeks now. I'm so tired, its hard to wake me up in the morning. I am just exhausted and feeling generally *blah* until around 2 in the afternoon. I don't feel like doing anything. My husband is starting to complain about my lack of housekeeping skills lately. Its like I am physically tired, as well as mentally. My body feels heavy and I swear if I laid my head down sometimes...I'd be asleep in less than a minute. I don't know if you can relate or not but...

Hi to the rest of you. I'm going to bed. Morning is coming way too early. I did my first application of my cream tonight. I don't itch as bad...guess that's something. See you all in the morning.

~chris
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Old 04-15-2005, 12:20 PM   #22  
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Hello everyone.

Have a question for you guys, I don't think anyone here has had gastric bypass, but do you know of anyone with RA who has?

I'm actually considering this (well, more than considering, I"ve made the appointment with the surgeon). I was wondering what kind of hurdles I was going to have to jump through with the rheumatologist.

Kim
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Old 04-15-2005, 12:24 PM   #23  
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Dear Angle lover, thanks for asking. I wish I could say I'm doing great but the truth is I have been in alot of pain lately. my feet and hands are hurting so much these days I can hardly stand let alone walk. MY dieting is becoming a struggle and it's only a week and 5 days. I guess I'm so miserable with my pain that everything seems like a big hurdle. I know what you mean about being sick and tired of being sick and tired, also living alone and not causing anyone any trouble. With me my children and Husband have become acustomed to hearing me complain about my pain that sometimes I think they just don't realize how bad off I truly am. Oh well enough about me.
I am sorry you are having difficulty with the meds. I know how hard it is not to let the depression get the best of you. I hope things work out for you and you have a great weekend. love Wifie
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Old 04-15-2005, 01:36 PM   #24  
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Chris, the only test for Fibromyalgia is a pressure test on 18 spots on the body. I tested for 17 out of 18. They do have to rule out certain other diseases, however. So you may be asked to do a 24 hours urine test, among a few others. That is how they diagnose FM right now.

The fatigue - well how to explain it. It isn't just being tired. It is a body in complete exhaustion after sleeping a whole night. It feels heavy and doesn't want to move. This is when I hit the carbs - sweet ones. It doesn't seem like I have any control over it. My body is craving sugar for energy. It sometimes works to eat sugar. The funny thing is, I can sit and eat TWO chocolate bars, my blood sugar goes up, but it NEVER falls back down. That is the only way for me to get over the fatigue. Fruit doesn't work, and Vitamin B doesn't work.

I hope you were able to get some much needed rest.

Wifey - I hope you feel better as the day goes on. I don't have any experiences with RA, thank goodness. I have OA and FM and that is enough to contend with.

Well everybody have a good day.
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Old 04-15-2005, 01:40 PM   #25  
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Just putting this here for those that HAVEN"T read it. Give it to your family and let them understand it from this point of view.

.................................................. ................

An excellent story for anyone with chronic illness. This is about Lupus but certainly tells the story for all people that have chronic pain.

The Spoon Theory

My best friend Jenni and I were in the diner talking. As usual, it was very late and we were eating French fries with gravy. Like normal girls our age, we spent a lot of time in the diner while in college, and most of the time we spent talking about boys, music or trivial things, that seemed very important at the time. We never got serious about anything in particular and spent most of our time laughing.

As I went to take some of my medicine with a snack as I usually did, she watched me this time, with a kind of stare, instead of continuing the conversation. She then asked me out of the blue what it felt like to have Lupus and be sick. I was shocked not only because she asked the random question, but also because I assumed she knew all there was to know about Lupus. She came to doctors with me, she saw me walk with a cane, and throw up in the bathroom. Jenni had seen me cry in pain, what else was there to know? I started to ramble on about pills, and aches and pains, but she kept pursuing, and didn't seem satisfied with my answers. I was a little surprised as being my roommate in college and friend for years; I thought she already knew the medical definition of Lupus. Then she looked at me with a face every sick person knows well, the face of pure curiosity about something no one healthy can truly understand. She asked what it felt like, not physically, but what it felt like to be me, to be sick.

As I tried to gain my composure, I glanced around the table for help or guidance, or at least stall for time to think. I was trying to find the right words. How do I answer a question I never was able to answer for myself? How do I explain every detail of every day being effected, and give the emotions a sick person goes through with clarity. I could have given up, cracked a joke like I usually do, and changed the subject, but I remember thinking if I don’t try to explain this, how could I ever expect her to understand. If I can’t explain this to my best friend, how could I explain my world to anyone else? I had to at least try.

At that moment, the spoon theory was born. I quickly grabbed every spoon on the table; **** I grabbed spoons off of the other tables. I looked at her in the eyes and said “Jenni, here you go, you have Lupus”. She looked at me slightly confused, as anyone would when they are being handed a bouquet of spoons. The cold metal spoons clanked in my hands, as I grouped them together and shoved them into her hands. I explained that the difference in being sick and being healthy is having to make choices, or to consciously think about things when the rest of the world doesn’t have to. The healthy have the luxury of choice, a gift most people take for granted.

Most people start the day with unlimited amount of possibilities, and energy to do whatever they desire, especially young people. For the most part, they do not need to worry about the effects of their actions. So for my explanation, I used spoons to convey this point. I wanted something for her to actually hold, for me to then take away, since most people who get sick feel a “loss” of a life they once knew. If I was in control of taking away the spoons, then she would know what it feels like to have someone or something else, in this case Lupus, being in control.

She grabbed the spoons with excitement. She didn’t understand what I was doing, but she is always up for a good time, so I guess she thought I was cracking a joke of some kind like I usually do when talking about touchy topics. Little did she know how serious I would become?

I asked her to count her spoons. She asked why, and I explained that when you are healthy you expect to have a never-ending supply of "spoons". But when you have to now plan your day, you need to know exactly how many “spoons” you are starting with. It doesn’t guarantee that you might not lose some along the way, but at least it helps to know where you are starting. She counted out 12 spoons. She laughed and said she wanted more. I said no, and I knew right away that this little game would work, when she looked disappointed, and we hadn't even started yet. I’ve wanted more "spoons" for years and haven’t found a way yet to get more, why should she? I also told her to always be conscious of how many she had, and not to drop them because she can never forget she has Lupus.

I asked her to list off the tasks of her day, including the most simple. As, she rattled off daily chores, or just fun things to do; I explained how each one would cost her a spoon. When she jumped right into getting ready for work as her first task of the morning, I cut her off and took away a spoon. I practically jumped down her throat. I said " No! You don’t just get up. You have to crack open your eyes, and then realize you are late. You didn’t sleep well the night before. You have to crawl out of bed, and then you have to make your self something to eat before you can do anything else, because if you don’t, you can't take your medicine, and if you don’t take your medicine you might as well give up all your spoons for today and tomorrow too." I quickly took away a spoon and she realized she hasn’t even gotten dressed yet. Showering cost her a spoon, just for washing her hair and shaving her legs. Reaching high and low that early in the morning could actually cost more than one spoon, but I figured I would give her a break; I didn’t want to scare her right away. Getting dressed was worth another spoon. I stopped her and broke down every task to show her how every little detail needs to be thought about. You cannot simply just throw clothes on when you are sick. I explained that I have to see what clothes I can physically put on, if my hands hurt that day buttons are out of the question. If I have bruises that day, I need to wear long sleeves, and if I have a fever I need a sweater to stay warm and so on. If my hair is falling out I need to spend more time to look presentable, and then you need to factor in another 5 minutes for feeling badly that it took you 2 hours to do all this.

I think she was starting to understand when she theoretically didn’t even get to work, and she was left with 6 spoons. I then explained to her that she needed to choose the rest of her day wisely, since when your “spoons” are gone, they are gone. Sometimes you can borrow against tomorrow’s "spoons", but just think how hard tomorrow will be with less "spoons". I also needed to explain that a person who is sick always lives with the looming thought that tomorrow may be the day that a cold comes, or an infection, or any number of things that could be very dangerous. So you do not want to run low on "spoons", because you never know when you truly will need them. I didn’t want to depress her, but I needed to be realistic, and unfortunately being prepared for the worst is part of a real day for me.

We went through the rest of the day, and she slowly learned that skipping lunch would cost her a spoon, as well as standing on a train, or even typing at her computer too long. She was forced to make choices and think about things differently. Hypothetically, she had to choose not to run errands, so that she could eat dinner that night.

When we got to the end of her pretend day, she said she was hungry. I summarized that she had to eat dinner but she only had one spoon left. If she cooked, she wouldn’t have enough energy to clean the pots. If she went out for dinner, she might be too tired to drive home safely. Then I also explained, that I didn’t even bother to add into this game, that she was so nauseous, that cooking was probably out of the question anyway. So she decided to make soup, it was easy. I then said it is only 7pm, you have the rest of the night but maybe end up with one spoon, so you can do something fun, or clean your apartment, or do chores, but you can’t do it all.

I rarely see Jenni emotional, so when I saw her upset I knew maybe I was getting through to her. I didn’t want my friend to be upset, but at the same time I was happy to think finally maybe someone understood me a little bit. She had tears in her eyes and asked quietly “Christine, How do you do it? Do you really do this everyday?” I explained that some days were worse then others; some days I have more spoons then most. But I can never make it go away and I can’t forget about it, I always have to think about it. I handed her a spoon I had been holding in reserve. I said simply, “Jenni, I have learned to live life with an extra spoon in my pocket, in reserve. You need to always be prepared”

Its hard, the hardest thing I ever had to learn is to slow down, and not do everything. I fight this to this day. I hate feeling left out, having to choose to stay home, or to not get things done that I want to. I wanted her to feel that frustration. I wanted her to understand, that everything everyone else does comes so easy, but for me it is one hundred little jobs in one. I need to think about the weather, my temperature that day, and the whole day's plans before I can attack any one given thing. When other people can simply do things, I have to attack it and make a plan like I am strategizing a war. It is in that lifestyle, the difference between being sick and healthy. It is the beautiful ability to not think and just do. I miss that freedom. I miss never having to count "spoons".

After we were emotional and talked about this for a little while longer, I sensed she was sad. Maybe she finally understood. Maybe she realized that she never could truly and honestly say she understands. But at least now she might not complain so much when I can't go out for dinner some nights, or when I never seem to make it to her house and she always has to drive to mine. I gave her a hug when we walked out of the diner. I had the one spoon in my hand and I said “Jenni, don’t worry. I see this as a blessing. I have been forced to think about everything I do. Do you know how many spoons people waste everyday? I don’t have room for wasted time, or wasted “spoons” and I chose to spend this time with you.”

Ever since this night, I have used the spoon theory to explain my life to many people. In fact, my family and friends refer to spoons all the time. It has been a code word for what I can and cannot do. Once people understand the spoon theory they seem to understand me better, but I also think they live their life a little differently too. I think it isn’t just good for understanding Lupus, but anyone dealing with any disability or illness. Hopefully, they don’t take so much for granted or their life in general. I give a piece of myself, in every sense of the word when I do anything. It has become an inside joke. I have become famous for saying to people jokingly that they should feel special when I spend time with them, because they have one of my "spoons".

© 2003 by Butyoudontlooksick.com
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Old 04-15-2005, 03:20 PM   #26  
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Kim, I'm not sure they'd even let someone with RA have gastric bypass surgery. I'm not sure but my SIL had the bypass surgery done and she got an infection and she had breathing problems from the anesthesia. She was in ICU for awhile. Don't mean to scare you. It's a very risky surgery.

Joanne, That's exactly how I feel. Totally and completely exhausted after a full nights sleep. I'm sleeping so solid right now, I don't even wake up to go to the bathroom like I usually do. But when I get up in the morning (only because I have to take care of my little girls), I feel like I haven't slept in days and my whole body is extremely heavy feeling. ANd I have been craving the carbs like crazy too. I don't have any aching pains though...so thats good.

Okay...I'll address the rest of you later. My sisters' are here with all their children. I'll catch up with you in a bit.

~chris
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Old 04-16-2005, 10:19 PM   #27  
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Hi everyone,

Chrily....It's hard to explain Fibromyalgia.......for me it's mostly FATIGUE, but, then, RA & Lupus causes that, also. Need to separate the word fatigue from tired, also. I feel NO energy. This is all the time. But, there are times, it's like I've got nothing but water in me....no blood. I can't sit up, stand up, or do anything. I've been dressed for church before & going out the door. Fatigue would hit me, & I'd have to sit down. Finally would decide I wasn't able to go & DH would go on alone. I went into town today feeling fairly well. I was going to check on my mother & get a few groceries. Decided to stop & see my sister at the shop she works at. I got so fatigued, I had to go home without groceries, or checking on my mother....barely able to drive. It's hard to plan anything. Also, the pain. I will hurt in different places at different times....very strange. Happy Canuk told you how they check for FM. There's not a blood test for it. It's possible you have it, but also, the way you have to take care of your children & the house & DH with RA could also give you the fatigue you're talking about. I've had RA for 3 yrs now, & have gone through that since I was first diagnosed.
I have spells of insomnia, then spells of wanting to sleep all the time. So sorry you're having these problems. (((hugs)))

Kim....I'd be very afraid of any surgery with RA. A few weeks ago, there was a possibility of sugery on my neck. My Rheumy was very concerned & wanted to make sure the surgeon set it up in the middle of one of my treatments. There's lots of danger of infection. Every little thing that happens to me causes infection. I burned my finger on a hot plate 2 weeks ago. My Dr kept going on about it this past Monday because it's swollen & almost blue! Wants me to let him know if it gets worse! All because of RA! Just be careful.

Happy Canuk...I've always enjoyed that story of the spoons. In fact, I've had it saved in My Documents since the first time I read. It explains things better than I EVER could!
I went through a spell of craving those sweets yesterday! We had Gumbo cooked by Br Jones mother, who's visiting from LA....so, she knew how to cook it! She also knew how to cook a declicious cake. I ended up eating a very small piece. I know...........

Wifie.....you sound so much like me...we could almost be sisters! In a way, I suppose we all are! Hang in there. What choice do we have? It's either fight for our life, or give in. What kind of life would that be? I still have things I want to do, & I sure won't get to do them if I give in. I know my family doesn't understand. They seem concerned, especially my 3 married daughters, but I don't want that. I just want understanding when I don't feel well. I like to just be left alone & people to not be hurt at me for not doing things they want me to do. I'm sure you understand what I'm saying. There's always something going on, places to go, etc. I have 11 grandchildren that I love dearly. I'm not able to go watch them cheer, play ball, etc. As the day goes on, I get weaker. I do try to take one grand at a time & have a day alone with them. It's always been a tradition. This way, I can pick the day I feel up to it. I'm sorry.....I'm rambling.

Hi Joanne....How's it going with your sister, now? Have you worked anything out with her so you can have some beach time alone? I hope so. I bet that beach is warm & beautiful now! Oh, I'd love to go lay out or walk a little while on it!! Think of me next time you go.

Friday:
Breakfast: Coffee, 3 sugar-free cookies
Lunch: Salad, Diet Sprite
Supper: Gumbo, The remainder of my diet Sprite, a very small piece of cake.....well, I was honest!

Saturday: Coffee, 3 sugar-free cookies
Lunch: Lean pocket, water
Supper: Beans, a little cornbread, polk salad (anyone heard of it???) Picked out of the fied....boil & drain...fry with onions & eggs....yummmm! , water

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Old 04-19-2005, 01:51 PM   #28  
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Good-almost-not-morning. Looks like its getting closer to lunchtime. OOPS

Well I'm still kind of fatigued but I've been trying to get myself in bed before 10 and that seems to help a bit. Its just strange because I'm not really hurting at all, except for my foot. And that I believe, is because of my shoes.

I'm working out the kinks in my eating little by little. Yesterday I didn't have any sugar. I felt alot better without it. I also drank 74 oz. of water by dinner time. Today I had some oatmeal so far. I'm trying to keep drinking water. I read an article that said sugar and artificial sweeteners can create a build up of junk and make your liver not function properly. So I guess I'm trying to get rid of that stuff in my body..at least some of it.

Charlotte-Any news about what they are going treat your lupus and fibromyalgia? I wish you felt better. Darn stuff! Rest when you need to, I guess. I'm still struggling with that with my husband. He thinks I'm faking the non-peppy feeling. I wish he only knew. It goes right along with that "you don't look sick, so how can you feel that way" thing. Just had to tell you too, that I go through periods (long periods) of insomnia too. No matter what, I have a hard time staying asleep during those times. Wonder why that is.

Hi Joanne, How's the beach? I really dream of being there today. We have a yucky cloudy, snowy, drizzly day. Its a nice day to stay inside but boy would some sunshine on my face feel so good.

Hi Wifey-How are you feeling today? Hopefully somewhat better. The beginning is the hardest. Along the way, you find ways to cope with the pain and different ways of doing things. There are tricks to try with RA... Each person, I swear, is different. I haven't had any real intense pain days for almost 2 years now...with the exception of my wrists. Since I've been put on methotrexate, I've been so much better. Also good enough to not take much of anything else. Thank God!

Well my sister is here, so I'll check back later.

~chris
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Old 04-20-2005, 12:31 PM   #29  
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Hello everyone, I am back feeling a little better. I started taking all my vitamins and herbs correctly again and am feeling better. I also got tougher with my diet, and am only eating meat,eggs,fish, poultry, and small amounts of vegs. I am also staying away from the scale for a while. That is what got me in trouble last week . I seemed to have gained back 4 of my 5lbs. that, and my pain threw me into a nasty mood.

Thank G-d for this board and all the words of encoragement (sp?) it's what I needed to get me back on track again. I will have to find some form of excersize that I can do without having to put too much stress on my feet. It was bad enough not having energy but now with both feet causing me so much pain. Oh well in the imortal words of Scarlet I won't worry about it today I'll think of it tomorrow. lol . I have to say now that I cut out all the carbs I'm feeling more energetic.
So far today for breakfast I had about 2oz of chedard cheese, coffee and a bite of pork chop from last nights dinner. Wishing all a happy, and wonderful day. love, Wifie
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Old 04-20-2005, 06:07 PM   #30  
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http://www.immunesupport.com/library...le.cfm?ID=6384

For those interested in Fibromyalgia. Some info in here. I have a support board for chronic pain, if any of you are interested, let me know. It is a closed board and can be accessed by invitiation only.
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