General Diet Plans and Questions - Frozen Meals!




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amystev2014
10-15-2013, 03:05 PM
Has anyone lost weight eating frozen meals such as Amy's, Lean Cuisine, Health Choice etc? I don't like to cook and the no thought process of just popping one of these in the microwave seems like it would be great for me! I need a very VERY simple no stress way of eating in order to stick with my weight loss! :D


kaplods
10-15-2013, 03:33 PM
I've been using up to 2 frozen dinners per day using "The Simple Diet," which uses 3 protein shakes + 2 entrees + 5 (or more) servings of vegetables and fruit

Frozen dinners can be used for the entrees if they meet the nutrition guidelines. The Dr. Anderson's simple diet thread includes all the guidelines.

I bought the book on kindle.

amystev2014
10-15-2013, 03:48 PM
Thanks I'll have to check that out!!!


breannabelle
10-15-2013, 04:36 PM
I am doing WW, and using Lean Cuisine for lunch every day, and dinner some days of the week. In 4 weeks, I am down 7.6 pounds (slowly, but surely)... As long as I keep track of the points in the meals, and stay within daily guidelines, it has not been a problem, but actually a helpful way for me to portion control.

Good luck!

PUPMOM5
10-15-2013, 06:39 PM
I've been on WW since January 1st - I eat Smart Ones all the time!!

shrewlu
10-16-2013, 06:43 AM
I've been on WW since January 1st - I eat Smart Ones all the time!!

Me too! I find them to be an easy form of portion control and they don't taste too bad either.

Breannaj1215
10-24-2013, 09:51 AM
I eat them almost everyday for lunch. Im not a big reheated meat kind of girl so when i dont want soup, a salad, or sandwich its a good quick way to get yummy food in for little calories. I love the lean cuisine cheese pizza. its so good

kisskiss
10-24-2013, 01:01 PM
Has anyone lost weight eating frozen meals such as Amy's, Lean Cuisine, Health Choice etc? I don't like to cook and the no thought process of just popping one of these in the microwave seems like it would be great for me! I need a very VERY simple no stress way of eating in order to stick with my weight loss! :D

I started off my weight loss by eating Lean Cuisines. I try to cook more often now, but frozen meals were quick and an easy way to count my calories. Some of them have a little more sodium so I try to avoid those. I love lean cuisine steamers, Amy's has low calorie options, and I've hd some great Evo meals.

Wannabeskinny
10-25-2013, 10:09 AM
Nope, would never. I'm fairly convinced that pre packaged food is how this country got itself into the obesity predicament in the first place. I'm pretty sure that prepackaged food megacompanies aren't going to get us out of it. The key to good health is fresh food. I have a lot of friends who don't cook and now have kids and they're passing on the same bad habits to their kids by opening up canned foods, frozen foods, boxed foods and take out. This is an epidemic.

kaplods
10-25-2013, 02:22 PM
I was a "whole food purist" for years at various points in my life (including, ironically at my highest weight). I quite eaily maintained my super obese weight on whole grains, healthy fats, fruits and vegetables and sometimes meat and fish. Most recently, adding Paleo to the mix (though I still had to control portions).

If I had unlimited funds or energy, I would eat whole-food, semi-paleo (I do eat some cultured dairy).

I don't have either, so I make my own frozen meals when I do have the energy, and if I run out of my own before I have the time or energy to restock, I use what I can find or send hubby for at the grocery store. I read the ingredient labels carefully, avoiding the ingredients and additives I'm most concerned with, and choose the best options I can.

Ironically, I resorted to this because of health problems, and expected to feel worse, more often. That hasn't been the case. My health and pain issues are more closely tied to sleep and weather than diet. Sugar and gluten grains do aggravate my symptoms, but I still avoid those even in frozen dinners.

I do drink more water to compensate for the added salt. And I still consume 5-10 servings of the best, freshest fruit and vegetables I can afford.

I think refined carbs, and carb/calorie intake, along with a DRASTIC decline in activity have had the most severe impacts on our healths and weight. What we eat plays a big role, but I think the lack of movement in our lives is at least as imporrtant.

Wannabeskinny
10-25-2013, 05:07 PM
There are a lot of things that contribute to the epidemic but thy are all driven by the "I want it fast, I want it easy and I want it cheap" philosophy our culture thrives in. I'm not perfect either but the easy way is not always the most sustainable way. I've given up reading the ingredients and only buy ingredients nowadays. I too make frozen dinners but I make them from scratch. I think it's easy and it's cheaper and I know what's in it.

I don't judge anyone. But what's easier than chopping up a salad and grilling a chicken breast? These require the most basic of basic cooking skills. What's with the "I can't or won't do it unless its easy" thoughts? Come in, give yourself a little credit!

mygirlvj
10-25-2013, 05:29 PM
I eat them (lean cuisines) often enough 3-4 times a week for lunch or supper if I'm in a hurry (or being lazy) there quick easy and alot healthier than anything I would order from a drive thru. I don't worry about the sodium as I think it will flush through. Drink a lot of water. They have also helped me get a better understanding of a portion size :)

kaplods
10-25-2013, 05:48 PM
I do give myself a great deal of credit, for what I can and do accomplish. I'm an extremely competent shopper and cook, which is why I cook when I can, but I also have health and pain issues that make getting up and going to the toilet barely possible some days.

I was finding that on the worst days, I was reaching for the highest calorie of whole-food comfort foods. Nuts, dried fruits, my homemade yogurt, and local grass-fed dairy cheeses (which here in my area of Wisconsin are no more expensive than mass-market cheeses in most other areas of the country).

Even worse, I would turn over meal responsibilities to my husband, a restaurant-trained chef who has his own health, pain, and mobility issues (we're both disabled by them and on SSDI as a result). If he also didn't feel like cooking, his go-to choice is a nearby family-owned asian store and deli. The food is all made from scratch, but tends to be either quite high in high carbs or fat (or both) and sodium as well (which is more of a problem for hubby as my blood sodium levels tend to run on the unhealthy side of low. I'm one of the few people encouraged by their doctor to eat more salt).

Most months I have enough good days to rely on my own "from scratch" cooking and food prep to carry myself through the bad days.

Unfortunately, season-change and other extended periods of drastically changeable weather are the exception.

This week I haven't even had the strength, energy or balance to shower.

When we had a small chest freezer, making all my own frozen meals, several weeks' worth at a time, was practical. However when the freezer died (and we didn't have the money to replace it) that left us with only the small freezer compartment of our refrigerator.

Picking up a few Kashi, Amy's, or Evol dinners or even the occasional Lean Cuisine or Healthy Choice isn't the End of the World.

You can't have everything. Affordable (and cost effective), easy, healthy, low-calorie, tasty, filling, fast, with minimal clean-up.... If I can manage 4 out of the 7, I consider myself doing pretty good, especially on the days when bathing and even dressing are beyond my capacity.

ChickieChicks
10-26-2013, 12:38 PM
I ate a lot of Lean Cuisine during my weight loss, and I still eat them for lunch one or two times a week. I laugh now, because I always ate them over salad...and now they've come out with a product line designed to be eaten over salad. I could have been rich! ;) lol

I had no adverse effects on my weight loss by eating them. And they certainly don't affect my maintenance of almost two years.

Mrs Snark
10-28-2013, 03:41 PM
I'm a lazy, lazy, lazy, anti-cooking, lazy, hungry vegan. I don't want to cook alot, because I hate cooking. I eat plenty of fresh stuff (alot of it raw because I hate cooking) but I also eat plenty of frozen meals, particularly Amy's.

Love me some Amy's. Plenty of Tandoor Chef, too.

kaplods
10-28-2013, 11:00 PM
I'm a lazy, lazy, lazy, anti-cooking, lazy, hungry vegan. I don't want to cook alot, because I hate cooking. I eat plenty of fresh stuff (alot of it raw because I hate cooking) but I also eat plenty of frozen meals, particularly Amy's.

Love me some Amy's. Plenty of Tandoor Chef, too.



TANDOOR CHEF!!!!!

I am not vegetarian, but gosh do I miss Tandoor Chef!!!!!!!!

I've run across the branf once or twice since moving to Northcentral Wisconsin (from central Illinois), but none of the stores carry them predictably (at least, not that I've found).

I even bought a curried saag (spinach, for those who aren't familiar with indian food) in a can out of despiration (which was horrible).

Even the ingredients for Indian food are pretty scarce, and I don't have the money or skills to do it right from scratch. Instead when we visit my family in Illinois I stock up on jarred sauces from the Indian grocery.

I'm flexible and don't really crave meat unless I'm hormonal (unfortunately with menopause approaching, I'm hormonal a lot lately) so I love good veg*n food as much as any other good food (too much, in other words). Hubby on the other hand is only willing to eat Indian vegetarian food (although he makes amazing vegan Chinese food when we've had dinner parties with veg*n friends). He was trained in a gourmet Chinese restaurant and they often cooked for Budhist banquets.

diamondgeog
10-28-2013, 11:48 PM
I've subbed frozen with what my store calls in house roasted turkey. Have the turkey plain. Then some hummus and veggies. Sometimes fruit, sometimes organic egg, cheese. So I am not cooking as much as assembling lunches.

BTW not using bread has been liberating. You don't need it on almost anything you think you did.

Wannabeskinny
10-29-2013, 08:21 AM
TANDOOR CHEF!!!!!

I am not vegetarian, but gosh do I miss Tandoor Chef!!!!!!!!

I've run across the branf once or twice since moving to Northcentral Wisconsin (from central Illinois), but none of the stores carry them predictably (at least, not that I've found).

I even bought a curried saag (spinach, for those who aren't familiar with indian food) in a can out of despiration (which was horrible).

Even the ingredients for Indian food are pretty scarce, and I don't have the money or skills to do it right from scratch. Instead when we visit my family in Illinois I stock up on jarred sauces from the Indian grocery.

I'm flexible and don't really crave meat unless I'm hormonal (unfortunately with menopause approaching, I'm hormonal a lot lately) so I love good veg*n food as much as any other good food (too much, in other words). Hubby on the other hand is only willing to eat Indian vegetarian food (although he makes amazing vegan Chinese food when we've had dinner parties with veg*n friends). He was trained in a gourmet Chinese restaurant and they often cooked for Budhist banquets.

You can order spices online http://www.thespicehouse.com/

kaplods
10-29-2013, 09:57 AM
You can order spices online http://www.thespicehouse.com/

You can buy everything online. My health issues make it challenging to shop any other way (especially if I want to buy a gift for my husband, since he is my only transportation. I do not drive, because I have lost the ability to cocentrate or even stay awake behind the wheel (or anywhere).

The cognitive and neurological problems began about two years before I had to quit working. If I had had a job with closer supervision, I probably would have had to quit (or been fired) much earlier.

At my worst, it wasn't safe for me to use the stove or even a curling iron or any of my electric heating or cutting tools/appliances without my husband's close supervision.

I don't like to talk about that part of my disability. It's easier to talk about the pain, connective tissue damage and immune system failure than the neurological and cognitive issues. I have a master's degree in psychology and my brain doesn't work, how embarrasing.

I've pretty much become a hermit and primarily communicate online, because my cognitive impairment and neurological impairment is less apparent online. The only thing anyone might notice, if they knew me before is that my spelling, grammar and punctuation skills have declined and that I repeat myself more often.

In person though on a bad flare day; though, I can sound intoxicated (which is ironic consider how little I've ever drunk, even in college).

The REAL reason I'm having to rely more and more on frozen dinners is that the cognitive issues are worsening again and I'm having fewer days that I can cook safely.

The worst part is that I can't trust my own judgement. Just because I feel clear headed enough to be cooking, doesn't mean that I am. I've started burning food and even destroying cookwear in the process again.

To be honest, I'm now afraid to use the stove and the main reason I still try to do as much cooking as I can, is that I am stubborn and don't want to admit my true level of impairment. Oh well, it is what it is.

As to buying spices online, I prefer Spices, Etc. They have some pretty nifty ingredients. Wine, mushroom, and stock powders are my favorites. The powders have no salt or added seasonings, but they're awesome flavor boosters.

Wannabeskinny
10-29-2013, 10:12 AM
You can buy everything online. My health issues make it challenging to shop any other way (especially if I want to buy a gift for my husband, since he is my only transportation. I do not drive, because I have lost the ability to cocentrate or even stay awake behind the wheel (or anywhere).

The cognitive and neurological problems began about two years before I had to quit working. If I had had a job with closer supervision, I probably would have had to quit (or been fired) much earlier.

At my worst, it wasn't safe for me to use the stove or even a curling iron or any of my electric heating or cutting tools/appliances without my husband's close supervision.

I don't like to talk about that part of my disability. It's easier to talk about the pain, connective tissue damage and immune system failure than the neurological and cognitive issues. I have a master's degree in psychology and my brain doesn't work, how embarrasing.

I've pretty much become a hermit and primarily communicate online, because my cognitive impairment and neurological impairment is less apparent online. The only thing anyone might notice, if they knew me before is that my spelling, grammar and punctuation skills have declined and that I repeat myself more often.

In person though on a bad flare day; though, I can sound intoxicated (which is ironic consider how little I've ever drunk, even in college).

The REAL reason I'm having to rely more and more on frozen dinners is that the cognitive issues are worsening again and I'm having fewer days that I can cook safely.

The worst part is that I can't trust my own judgement. Just because I feel clear headed enough to be cooking, doesn't mean that I am. I've started burning food and even destroying cookwear in the process again.

To be honest, I'm now afraid to use the stove and the main reason I still try to do as much cooking as I can, is that I am stubborn and don't want to admit my true level of impairment. Oh well, it is what it is.

As to buying spices online, I prefer Spices, Etc. They have some pretty nifty ingredients. Wine, mushroom, and stock powders are my favorites. The powders have no salt or added seasonings, but they're awesome flavor boosters.

Sorry to hear that you're going through so much. It sounds like you may need some physical help in your home, I'd hate to think what could happen under these conditions. Do you have any family that can help you?

kaplods
10-29-2013, 11:07 AM
Sorry to hear that you're going through so much. It sounds like you may need some physical help in your home, I'd hate to think what could happen under these conditions. Do you have any family that can help you?

No, we really don't. All the family near us are at least a generation older and in much worse shape than us.

As bad as our situation sounds, it would have to be a whole lot worse to qualify for the kind of assistance we could afford.

Besides which, knowing just how many people are in much, much worse condition, and how underfunded such programs are, I wouldn't feel comfortable taking a spot of someone in greater need.

Especially since most of the "help" I would receive would come in the form of teaching me to do, what I'm already doing now. Even on a bad day, I could probably teach the teachers.

There are meal delivery services locally, but even if we qualified, they're even less healthy than frozen dinners (school cafeteria food with too much salt, sugar, and fat).

We manage fine, I just don't cook on bad days and my husband helps me determine if it's a bad day. And even if we both agree it's a good day, he pays attention to what I'm doing so if I get distracted I don't walk away from something that needs monitoring.

Most of my cognitive issues revolve around my brain working either too fast (almost manic) or too slow. Both have their risks. Manic, and I try to do too much simultaneously, and too slow my reaction and hand-eye coordination is off.

The issues I've had recently with burning food and leaving on burners... was a result of lost vigilance. I had been doing so much better, for so long that we had stopped taking the extra precautions. I was cooking when hubby wasn't home or awake and during flares. It was working well until it wasn't.


We've now gone back to the extra precautions.

On good days, you'd never guess anything was wrong with me. That's the mystery of fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and autoimmune disease (chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia may actually be autoimmune diseases, doctors can't agree on that).

So on my good days, I do as much as I can, and on bad days I rest. I'm also relearning to rely on my husband to help me determine what I'm capable of.

I've even taught him a few caseworker tricks, such as morning treatment planning and goal setting meetings. We had gotten out of the habit (because I'd been doing so well). We've decided that it's better to use precautions that we don't need than not have them when we do.

Wannabeskinny
10-29-2013, 02:00 PM
I think everyone who needs help deserves to have it. That's my political stance in it.

kaplods
10-29-2013, 02:59 PM
I think everyone who needs help deserves to have it. That's my political stance in it.

I agree, but there just isn't nearly enough help to go around. One would hope that the most critical situations would take priority. Unfortunately, the programs don't have the staff, money, or time to determine who has the greatest need, so first come, first serve.

My skill set and experience gives me advantages most people in my situation don't have. In fact, I'm so far ahead of the curve that, as I alluded to before, the first tier of service would be to assign someone to teach me what I already know and do. And there's no way to "skip" the services that are needed.

Knowing that I would have to accept a great deal of help and services I don't need (but many others do) in order to eventually access the little bit of help I could use, just wouldn't be right - especially since my situation now without help is better than that of most people's will be with the help.

And my husband and I probably don't qualify anyway. Our SSDI income is too high, but not high enough to pay for services on our own.

I'm not complaining, because I think we do amazingly well. We found an apartment that is handicap accessible (though it wasn't advertised as such, it's more functionally designed and has more handicap accessible features than the handicap accessible apartments we looked at (but weren't handicapped enough to qualify for. We've cut our drug cost by asking our doctor to prescribe from the Sam's Club $4 list whenever possible (saving us and Medicare over $1000 per month). We're also super frugal shoppers.

It all works pretty well. It has though shown me how wasteful our pre-disability lifestyle was.