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Old 01-27-2006, 07:29 PM   #1  
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Default Is there such a thing as "TOO MUCH WATER"?

Hi, I am new here and am hoping that I can continue to be motivated to keep up my workouts and shed the excess weight (35-40lbs) I have been carrying around. I have been trying to read through as much of the posts as possible and haven't found the answer to a lingering question I have. I am wondering is there such a thing as too much water? I drink 120-140oz. of water per day. A friend of mine told me that she drinks 64oz per day and that by me drinking as much as I do that my body would probably retain that water and it would cause me to gain weight. I have been trying to look for information on this for the past few days but have found nothing to suggest that I am drinking too much water. I just started working out this week on Monday (I plan to workout 5 days per week--God help me!) and weighed myself at that time. Therefore, I am not sure if my body is retaining the water.

I started drinking 6-7 20oz. bottles of water on January 1st. The only other things I drink are green tea/crystal light and occassionally 100% fruit juice (not too often because of the high carb content). I eat pretty well balanced meals (no white rice/pasta/white bread/cookies/cakes, etc...), I drink bodytech whey protein with 90cals, 17g of protein, 3g carbs, 2g sugar (sweetened with Splenda) and I am not big on "junk foods" but would love to find a really great chocolate that I can have from time to time and not feel guilty about (appreciate any suggestions). My problem has been that I must stay consistent with my workouts (I skipped Wednesday, so I'll make it up tomorrow) which is what prompted me to join the site in the hopes that I will stay motivated and feel like there is support out there from others trying to lose like me or have lost weight. Any information, suggestions, etc is certainly welcomed!
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Old 01-27-2006, 08:02 PM   #2  
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If there is such thing as 2 much water, then I am going to die of an over load: crap!
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Old 01-27-2006, 08:27 PM   #3  
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The general rule of thumb is 1 oz water per 2lbs of body weight, but nothing hard and fast about this.

I have heard of people becoming very sick from too much water, but they were drinking something like 3-4 GALLONS per day.
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Old 01-27-2006, 08:53 PM   #4  
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It IS possible to drink too much water! Here's a good article to read: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication
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Old 01-27-2006, 09:10 PM   #5  
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With what you drink, you shouldn't be worried.
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Old 01-27-2006, 09:57 PM   #6  
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Thanks for the link LadyFirelyght!

Miaka, I am a bit confused. I shouldn't be worried about water intoxication or retaining the water and gaining weight from it (which was a part of my initial question)?

Thanks to all for the replies!
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Old 01-28-2006, 07:24 AM   #7  
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You shouldn't be worried about either the intoxication or retaining the water with the amount of water you drink. You don't drink enough for intoxication and water retention is not really dependent on how much you drink.
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Old 01-28-2006, 08:15 AM   #8  
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I truly believe there are two rules of thought on water...
The ones that drink it and feel 100% better and the ones that don't and say there is such a thing as too much.
I researched it and the only time water "intoxication" happens is usually with those in sports that down a gallon after an intense exercise especially happening with marathon runners.
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Old 01-28-2006, 08:37 PM   #9  
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ok, thanks guys! I didn't really think I was drinking too much. I just wanted to get other people's perspectives on the topic.
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Old 01-29-2006, 02:03 AM   #10  
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I think the ones who die of water intoxication are feeling poorly (after an event say) and assuming it is because they are dehydrated, therefore treating themselves with even more water which then becomes fatal. I think if you are a normally active person (or at least not a marathon runner) and you drink when you are thirsty and don't feel you are "forcing" excess water you'd be fine. Only if you started to feel poorly after drinking a lot, as long as you'd realize at that point that it wasn't dehydration and didn't start drinking even more...but I doubt that'd be an issue at your level. And more water does not cause water retention, as far as I know lack of water can contribute to that, but not more.
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Old 01-29-2006, 08:57 AM   #11  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blues4miles
I think the ones who die of water intoxication are feeling poorly (after an event say) and assuming it is because they are dehydrated, therefore treating themselves with even more water which then becomes fatal. I think if you are a normally active person (or at least not a marathon runner) and you drink when you are thirsty and don't feel you are "forcing" excess water you'd be fine. Only if you started to feel poorly after drinking a lot, as long as you'd realize at that point that it wasn't dehydration and didn't start drinking even more...but I doubt that'd be an issue at your level. And more water does not cause water retention, as far as I know lack of water can contribute to that, but not more.
blues--I hadn't thought about the lack of water being tied to water retention. Thanks for the info.
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Old 01-29-2006, 08:12 PM   #12  
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I can definately tell when I haven't had enough water. My body holds on to what I have and I can gain as much as five pounds. I think it is important to have plenty of water throughout the day. I have read that often times we mistake thirst as hunger. If I feel hungry, I am trying to drink a little first and then see if I am satisfied. To tell you the truth, before I started working on my weightloss I don't recall ever being thirsty (except when running). I know I was always feeding my thirst. Weird...
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Old 02-05-2006, 04:14 PM   #13  
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8 cups of water a day has long been recommended for both weight loss and general health.

BUT studies are coming out now saying that's excessive, and I agree. If I drink that much, I'm running to the bathroom all day. My body just doesn't want that much.

Water is my preferred beverage, so I go through 3-4 cups a day, and I certainly get it in foods and other drinks. I just won't force 8 down; it's crazy to be running to the bathroom every few minutes.
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Old 02-05-2006, 04:31 PM   #14  
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Can you drink too much water?
by Lynn Grieger, R.D., C.D., C.D.E.

Yes, and there is even a technical term for it: water intoxication!

In healthy people, the amount of water we drink is controlled by our thirst mechanism, located in the brain. We consume water in the form of liquids (juice, milk, soda) and also in foods primarily fruits and vegetables). The only foods that DON'T contain water are commercially dehydrated foods. Healthy adults require approximately three quarts of fluid each day. About half of this comes from food, with the remainder from beverages, hence the advice to drink eight cups of liquid each day. If you exercise, are breastfeeding, are ill, or live in a hot climate,your fluid needs are higher than the three quarts each day. However, it is possible to drink too much water if you put your mind to it. We're talking A LOT OF WATER, more than is possible under normal circumstances. Often associated with other obsessive-compulsive behaviors, drinking large amounts of water can be hazardous. Too much water in our system causes the dilution of essential electrolytes in our blood stream, which has implications for control of heart beat. My recommendation is 8-12 cups of fluid, combined with additional fluid to support exercise or hot conditions.

If you're drinking more than this, consult your physician.
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Old 02-05-2006, 04:32 PM   #15  
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Water! Why drink at least two quarts a day?

Because that's roughly how much water we lose normally through perspiration, waste removal and other functions. Add sultry weather or enough exercise to break a sweat and the amount of water needed to stay healthily hydrated - not to mention avoid fatigue, light-headedness, nausea, and even heat stroke - quickly climbs.

Additionally, water keeps your energy up, weight down, muscles strong, joints supple, digestive system smooth -- your whole system in physical balance.

Water:

1) regulates body temperature
2) makes up 83% of blood
3) removes waste
4) composes 75% of brain
5) helps carry nutrients and oxygen to cells
6) moistens oxygen for breathing
7) helps convert food to energy
8) protects and cushions vital organs
9) helps body absorb nutrients
10) accounts for 22% of bones
11) cushions joints
12) makes up 75% of muscles

It really depends on the person and their activity level as well as the weather. I find the more I drink the less I actually retain with my activity level and climate. Additionally because of diureteic effects of caffeine drinks you should have 1 8-ounce glass of water for each 8-ounce glass/cup of these you drink to minimize the effects.

On the other hand however, there is a thing as too much water. If you drink in excess of 8 liters without getting the proper other nutrients your body will actually start depleting itself of those nutrients.


Are you Hungry? Many of us mix up food pangs with water cravings!
By Malcolm Stewart, PhD

As a clinical and health psychologist, I work with many people who want to lose weight for personal or medical reasons. It's not uncommon to hear complaints of intense hunger between regular eating times, no matter how satisfying their meals. For some people, it's puzzling, irritating hunger that makes them want to pick at food constantly. Others describe sharp cravings that demand immediate satisfaction.

Regardless, the effect is the same: Despite increasing their physical activity (perhaps the key weight loss technique), they can't lose unwanted pounds.

But a little-known fact both helps explain these food pangs - and provides a means to deal with them: Sometimes thirst masquerades as hunger. So you may think your body is asking for food when what it's actually asking for is water.

Your body needs water - a lot of water, every day - more than anything else except oxygen. We can live without food for a week or more if necessary, but not without water. If your body has just 2 percent less than it requires, you'll feel fatigued. A 10 percent shortfall produce significant health risks. A week without water can be fatal. Adults need sixto eight 8-ounce glasses (about 1 ½ to 2 quarts) every day, more if you're large or physically active and even more if you drink much coffee, tea or cola, because the caffeine in these is a mild diuretic.

Why do we sometimes feel hungry when in fact we're thirsty? For one thing, many of us seem to have learned to interpret some signs of thirst as signs of hunger. For another, the body may seek food as a source of water because about 37 percent of our daily water intake comes from food. Fruits and vegetables are typically 70 to 95 percent water. Cooked meat is 50 to 60 percent. Even bread is made up of about 35 percent water.

So your body may signal that it's hungry in order to get more water through food. And because water is so important, the body gives off strong messages when it needs more, which is why thirst masquerading as hunger can be so compelling. Which would be fine if food didn't contain calories as well as water.

Being able to understand that sometimes "I'm hungry" really means "I'm thirsty"can help you react more healthfully, starting with drinking eight glasses daily. This takes a conscious effort for most of us, but it's easier if you make a habit of drinking water every time you do a particular activity - for instance, each time you go into the kitchen or whenever you're about to make a phone call. You can also up your intake by using a larger glass or drinking a refill. Some people find "sipper bottles" convenient.

Now apply this to dealing with hunger between meals (which can be translated as "reach for water, not the ice cream"). If you feel hungry when it's not meal time, first have a large glass of water, then get busy doing something - keep at it for at least 20 minutes before you consider eating anything.

After drinking one glass, you may immediately want another. This is your body saying, "Yes! That was want I really wanted - give me more!" If you still feel hungry after 20 minutes, try having another glass of water, then get busy again.

People often feel like they're "bad" or "weak" if they feel hungry at times they think they shouldn't be. However, once you are aware that thirst can masquerade as hunger, you realize that hunger pangs often are a legitimate request by the body - but for water rather than food.

This isn't a cure - all for curbing hunger, but I've learned from my practice that it can go along way toward beating between meal eating. And that can mean weight-loss success.
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