Exercise! - Any runners out there? I need tips/advice




joonzgurl
09-09-2003, 05:42 PM
I am beginning training to run better. I am hoping to do a 10K by March/April.

Here's my plan:

I am currently running 3 times/week.

2 laps warm-up walk
4 laps running
1 lap cooldown
Stretching

I plan to add 1-2 laps of running per week. Should it be one or two?

Is this an adequate training scheduelle? I have good running shoes (new balance rocks!) but should I inverst in some good running gear?

Anything you think may help me as I start this self challenge is appreciated.


alsbttrfly
09-10-2003, 04:55 PM
Hi,
This is the program I started to get back into running. The only difference is that each running session I did only lasted 30 minutes. This one has one more "repeat"
http://www.runnersworld.com/home/0,1300,4-112-0-678-2-2,00.html

For example week 1, Run 2 minutes,
walk 4 minutes.
Repeat 5 times,
I would only repeat 4 times. I found it in a book for women runners. Hope this helps. Also, I think its a ten percent increase when you want to increase distance, but if you're just beginning its better to run for time not distance

LeanneM83
09-24-2003, 08:49 PM
HI there

I too have started running, and I have been looking for advice on how to work up to running a 10km race. I have just had a baby 7 weeks ago, so I am using running to lose the weight as well as train for the 10km. I have been running for about 5 weeks, and I can now run 4.4km comfortably. I talked to a "running instructor" and they advised me to choose if I was shotting for time or distance and stick with one. Example, run for 45 minutes and see how far you get or run 5km and see how long it takes.
I decided to try running the distance and see how long it takes, and I have been increasing by 1km every week. I hope it works.
Hopefully you are doing well with your running, or maybe you have learned something and con offer me some advice....
Good Luck


Highest weight 222 (9 months pregnant)
Current weight 186
Goal Weight 150
Real goal weight 125-130


Emmaleth
09-25-2003, 10:41 AM
Hey there.....I used to be a runner (why oh why did I even quit?) and from advanced to beginner the rules are the same.

NEVER increase more than 10% a run....so you have got it right, I would do 1 lap and see how it goes.

Buy the best shoes you can afford

Have a cross training program planned out, you need to cross train because it cuts down on running related injuries. Try swimming or pilates on some days?

You need to replace elecrolytes in your system after a run, don't over do the water either...it pushes them out. Try a sports drink (SMALL like 6oz, not oversized gallon thigie) just to replace some elecrolytes. Water is good in small incraments before and after too, don't go over more than what you loose in weight after a run.

There ya go, if you need anymore tips or have q's let me know!

rojofish
09-25-2003, 08:33 PM
It sounds like you're doing what it takes to build up a solid foundation, and you shouldn't have any problem being in 10k shape by March. What a great goal!

That being said, take everyone's great advice seriously! It's no fun to be derailed in the middle of a training program you've been working really hard at. I would especially second the 10% rule, the stretching, and the crosstraining suggestions to avoid injuries. I did not take these things seriously and ended up with an IT injury that still plagues me, even on a bike.

Take care,
~Rojo

conway_1979
09-26-2003, 02:16 PM
OHHH Iliotibial injuries are the worst.. I mean the worst. Are you able to run at all? I too cannot stand being derailed in the middle of a good spell of fitness. I love my runs, because not only do they make me feel healthy, but also allow me to eat what I want. Obviously I still watch it, but will hve a treat here and there LOL! Really though, I always

Without being rude though, your body does not need the electrolytes as bad as Emmaleth says. If you are not carrying any diseases, you have enough electrolytes to run two marathons back to back and still retain 50% of the electrolytes in your body. Unfortunately, it is a marketing ploy. The water is much more important. It certainly does NOT push electrolytes out of your body. That is pure myth. You will get your electrlytes from your meals. Only sick or elderly folks need to watch their electrolyte imbalance. How many runners do you know that run to lose weight. run for an hour, burn 450 kcal. and then chug a 400 kcal. gatorade and eat 3 150 kcal powergels? I know plenty of them. Guess what, the industry is making billions, and they are losing no weight.

rojofish
09-26-2003, 08:58 PM
Conway~
You always...? Got me hangin' on the edge of my seat...
I haven't run since July 27th. I was up to mile 9 in a training program for the Honolulu Marathon when my ITBS flared up again with no warning. (First showed up in Jan. but I had been fine since March... did a sprint triathlon in June and everything.) Instead of laying off immediately I stupidly "ran through the pain" in a 10k race the following weekend and irritated it so badly that it hurt when I tried to swim. I had to give up the marathon, obviously, and now I'm in physical therapy.

I'm going to try to do 30 minutes this weekend... we'll see how it goes. I'm back on a bike and it's been a little sore. Plus, it is astounding at how out of shape I have become in two months off, so I don't know if I can do 15 minutes, much less 30!

I like to run for the same reasons you do. Absolutely the most effective way to burn those calories off! In addition, I've found that it gives me a chance to listen to my body with no other distractions. Just me and the road.

And I also have to agree that sports drinks are probably not necessary for people who run for less than 30 minutes at a time, although she did specify a small amount. Even when I was training 10-15 hours a week for the triathlon all I drank was water. Personally, I haven't found a sports drink yet that doesn't make me feel sick. However, if you like them and you're watching the calories then they're probably not going to hurt you, either.

What I do disagree with is only drinking as much water as you lose during a workout. What if you started out dehydrated, like on a morning run? Every body is different, and you need to drink until you are re-hydrated, whatever the amount. You're hydrated when your urine is clear. You're not really at risk for hyponatremia (too much water) unless you're sweating for several hours at a time or drinking gallons of water on a hot day without replacing some of the salt. Some salted pretzles work for that just as good as anything else.

In my opinion, unless you're planning to run for more than an hour at a time, (6+ miles) you don't need to eat or drink anything special... just make sure you get enough water before, during, and after, and a healthy, balanced diet.

~Rojo

Emmaleth
09-30-2003, 09:31 AM
Sorry girls,

My advice comes from marathons and not exersice so it may not apply to all. At that moment in time I did not run to loose weight so results may differ. However, my mother is the body-systems (fancy name for hey what is your body doing now) doctor for a prominent football team here in California, and with running (over 90 mins) she always told me to replace as much as I lost and take in eleycrolytes. Taking her advice in stride has always worked for me, but it may not for everyone. I even took this advice to the Olympic trials! My best friend and the person whom I ran with took it, and it ended up not working for her.

Again, it depends on the person. A more experianced and/or more endurance based runner may use take that advice though.

conway_1979:

As far as electrolytes....from what I have been told by dr. mom the more muscle based your body is the more you need to replace them. As far as it being a ploy, she just laughed and said...maybe! I always like to be safe so I am going to stick to what I do now, but definatley research the eleyctrolyte thing further! It iwill be pretty interesting to see if it is!