General Diet Plans and Questions - Paleo Diet?




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Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 01:42 PM
i'm confused with this. it says NO GRAINS. but the food pyramid emphasizes grains, it's the largest part of the food pyramid! and i'm so used to hearing "whole grains help you lose weight" and i've even switched from white bread to multi-grain/whole wheat. i'm also not good with knowing what has carbs and what doesn't. can anyone give me a sample day on the paleo diet? like, what do you eat for breakfast if you can't have cereal, oatmeal, pancakes, waffles, or toast? why can't i have a damn sandwich? and ramen... my fallback when i am out of food stamp money and have no food left. plus my grandmother is always making pasta salads and spaghetti and eating things on bread and in pitas... yet she's RAIL-THIN. like, my thigh is probably nearly as big around as her entire waist. she also thinks the paleo diet is total bullsh*t, and tells me "watch your portion sizes and you'll lose weight" but even that is bull. i have cut down to half sandwiches and single chicken breasts with steamed veggies instead of 2 legs and a thigh with mashed potatoes... i've been eating a good 1000+ calories less than what i was when i was comfort-eating or just plain old eating high-calorie stuff. but i really have no clue about this paleo diet. i'm looking into it, studying it, but i like personal feedback. an article isn't the same thing as people on the diet telling me what they do and how it works for them. soooo sorry this is kinda long but i guess my main point is:

why are grains "bad" yet the largest group in the food pyramid?
what sorts of carbs am i taking in without even realizing it?
what is a sample day is the paleo lifestyle?


BigSky
05-17-2013, 02:00 PM
Primal/Paleo basically describes eating as humans supposedly ate before organized agriculture began. Eating what was available as opposed to what was grown. I'm pretty sure this included plant vegetables, root vegetables, berries, any meats but not dairy. And no grains of any kind. It's lowish carb but definitely not Atkins.There are many primal and paleo websites, all you need to do is Google it. It's not for everyone and I agree that some people can live off of bread and never gain an ounce. But for some people, grains cause weight gain, inflammation, and digestive upset. Hope this helps.

Gezebelle
05-17-2013, 02:03 PM
I've considered doing more research into this diet and giving it a try. The basic idea is to eat the way humans did in the Paleolothic era. No processed foods, everything fresh. Many people can eat carbs all day long and stay thin because their digestive systems have evolved to be used to that kind of diet. Look at Native Americans for an example of a people who were hunter/gatherers for far longer than many other cultures. You can see in the high levels of obesity and diabetes that their bodies haven't changed enough to handle the higher levels of carbs and lower levels of physical activity. Obviously this is an over-simplified explanation, and I am by no means an expert.

Personally, I have started embarking on a semi-paleo type of diet. Lots of fresh meats and veggies. I hate cooking, so I mostly eat salads and meat or fish I've cooked on the stove. I would also like to hear insight and tips from people who have actually gone with this meal plan (I really hate the word diet when it's more like a lifestyle change).


veggiedaze
05-17-2013, 02:04 PM
The paleo diet is tough to do in my opinion because I've tried it and it is quite expensive since grains are the cheapest food sources. Also, when I went paleo my bingeing became really bad since I felt so deprived. The premise of the diet (or philosophy) is to eat the way the caveman did, before agriculture. I have no doubt it will help people lose weight simply because when you eat mostly vegetables and protein, the overall calories tend to be much less. I could be wrong but I believe refined oils are to be avoided in this diet as well.

I think if someone can do this then all the power to them. Some people say that by not eating grains you will stop craving them. It seemed to do the opposite to me. I guess a sample breakfast for someone doing paleo would be an omlette with lots of veggies. Also, there is no dairy allowed with paleo as far as I know.

Basically paleo means meat, veggies, and some nuts and seeds in there unprocessed forms. It is not easy like I said nor cheap. Someone could incorporate some of the principles like "less grains" and "more vegetables" without getting overly obsessed. From what I can tell (and have experienced on the message boards) is that paleo is practically a religion for some people. It also seems to make some eating disorders worse because of too much obsession over what foods are "proper for human consumption". It is probably a bit dangerous for people who suffer from orthorexia such as myself who become obsessed with the "right way of eating".

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 02:26 PM
hmmmm it does sound very difficult. and expensiveness is a big problem, as i only get $200 a month for food.

JenMusic
05-17-2013, 02:43 PM
Hey, Alyssa! Here are my thoughts and what's worked for me.

I became "accidentally low-carb" while I was losing weight - although I'm mainly a calorie counter, I realized over time that I was able to eat more filling food (for ME) when I ditched a lot of bready, starchy carbs and exchanged them for foods like lean meat, cheese, yogurt, olive oil, those types of foods. I also realized that my body actually felt better - more energy, more even mood, no blood sugar spikes, and fewer cravings. It wasn't all at once, but over time.

After all of that, THEN I started to discover this thing called Paleo, and it's cousin, Primal (which is a little more lenient with dairy and some other carbs). I still don't think of myself as following this path exclusively, but it's kind of my default.

I think people might be suggesting this kind of food plan for you because, simply by the elimination of a lot of those starchy carbs, overall calorie intake will fall without having to track calories (I saw the other thread where you talk about that).

Yes, in a lot of cases, starches are cheaper than a lot of other foods, certainly many proteins. But not all. The shoestring meals forum has TONS of ideas for low cost adaptations.

I'm underqualified to get into the FDA food pyramid discussion. :) I'm sure someone will chime in on that soon.

As far as what I eat on a day-to-day basis? Here's a sample, but PLEASE remember this is ME, and based on what I like. It's not the only way to do it.

Breakfast - Eggs with veggies and maybe some avocado.
Lunch - Some chicken breast or tuna or some other protein. A couple of cups of veggies, a TBS of olive oil.
Dinner - Ginormous salad with protein (veggie burger, or something else) with a few nuts.
Snacks/Dessert - Some berries, some Greek yogurt with flax, some mini cheeses.

Strict paleo frowns on dairy but cheese and yogurt seem fine for me.

Good luck!

Daki
05-17-2013, 02:45 PM
Grains aren't BAD. They just don't fit with the philosophy of Paleo living. Personally, I've always thought the food pyramid was a crock. Even as an 8 year old kid I couldn't understand why we were supposed to eat more bread/pasta/grains than meat/fruit/vegetables. Just did not make sense to me.

What has carbs? Bread. Pasta. Rice. Grains of any kind. Beans. Sauces/dressings/condiments. Yogurt. Veggies. Fruit. Dairy. Anything with sugar/corn syrup/juice. A lot of things have carbs.

You can google "paleo recipes" for some good stuff to eat. Just because you are eating what the cavemen ate doesn't mean you can't jazz it up. People have figured out good alternatives to all sorts of grain favorites.

I try to follow paleo-ish. I can't live without cheese and yogurt. So I eat those. I basically try to avoid grains (They make it hard for me to lose weight) and most prepackaged stuff. I also certainly don't buy organic grassfed meat. Try keeping an eye on the grocery store sales flyer to know what fruit and veggies are on sale that week, that will also help your wallet.

kaplods
05-17-2013, 03:00 PM
Paleo people apparently did eat wild grains (grass seeds), but not nearly as much of the diet as modern people. Also, we've bred a lot of the "good stuff" (especially protein and fiber" out of our grains.

Many grains actually contain substances that interfere with fertility. Thus if a group of animal eats "too much" of that grain, fewer babies will be born to eat that grain.

There are many "flavors" of paleo, each allowing and forbidding a different set of foods, but most forbid or severely limit grains. Personally, I believe grains may not be as bad for everyone as paleo viewpoints assume - but there does seem to be a link between grains and inflammation and autoimmune disease - but whether high-grain consumption causes or simply exacerbates these conditions, I'm not sure is clear.

In my own situation (living with a connective-tissue damaging autoimmune condition), I've experimented with grains and varying amounts and types of other high-carb foods, and discovered that I do have a problem with many grains, most especially the gluten grains.

I choose a low-grain, moderately low carb diet for myself. I don't eat grains, starches, or very sweet fruit (like bananas) every day, and when I do eat grains, I try to choose the higher fiber, higher protein ones like wild rice, quinoa...

The food pyramid is based on one theory of healthy eating. It may or may not be the best, and it's quite possible that there is no single "best diet" for everyone. I suspect that age, weight, genetics, activity level, specific health issues... may affect what type of diets are healthier than others. And even so, there may be several types of diets that are equally healthy.

My advice would be to experiment with a wide variety of plans, and pay attention to how you feel, and how the diet meets your personal goals.

kaplods
05-17-2013, 03:03 PM
Also, you can eat paleo on a very tight budget, but you're probably going to be eating a lot of tuna fish, pork, dark meat chicken, cabbage, and onions.

merilung
05-17-2013, 05:07 PM
There are plenty of websites that argue the virtues of primal/paleo. (this (http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/#axzz2TW7BSDJI) is a good, accessible place to start, IMO. Paleo Parents also has a good 'Paleo 101' guide including budget tips here (http://paleoparents.com/start-here/start-here-paleo-parents-101/) and I love many of the recipes on their website.

Most of us eating paleo/primal aren't perfect - we're just doing the best we can with what we have - and I don't know a lot of folks who follow the ideal to a T 100% of the time. My husband and I feel better the closer to perfect paleo we get and we strive to make meat, vegetables, and quality fats the staples of our diet.

Some folks find they spend more money eating paleo (or paleo-ish), but our food expenses actually went down after transitioning, largely because I wasn't hungry all the time and needed less food. We spend about $600 a month to feed two adults (and my husband has high caloric needs and eats far more food than one normal person) and a large dog, and we buy mostly grassfed meat and organic dairy. I'm pretty sure I could do Paleo on $200/mo. assuming I was only feeding myself. If I simply couldn't get enough calories on that budget, I'd incorporate small amounts of quinoa or rice.

I make my own yogurt out of whole milk, I make my own bone broth out of scraps from other meals (a whole chicken feeds us FOREVER after we make soup out of the carcass!), I make my own sauces out of farmer's market seconds which are often free. I render my own tallow and use that or saved bacon fat for cooking. Organ meats are often cheap and are nutrient dense. Tough cuts of boiling meat are cheap and make a lovely stew dinner. I already buy vegetables mostly on sale and a minimal amount of fruit - if I was on a tighter budget, I'd prioritize nutrient dense vegetables (spinach, kale, etc.) and cut out fruit entirely. Sweet Potatoes are a good high-calorie add-in if your diet is looking a little on the light side.

And honestly, I have a hard time envisioning a much easier diet. I do a lot of kitchen work because I enjoy it and it provides us with a wide variety, but during busy times it's SUPER easy to throw some ground meat, kale, and onions in a pan and cook until done. No mess, no fuss!

Lolo70
05-17-2013, 05:32 PM
Paleo is essentially a lower carb diet. I do not follow it, but I have some past experience with the effects of a high carb diet on your body. Essentially, I found that it significantly promoted inflammation. In my case (that is likely not typical) this led to a vicious cycle where inflammation promoted weight gain and this, in turn, led to more inflammation. It came to a point where I gained 50 lbs in a short period of time and thought I had autoimmune disease. Cutting out carbs helped me a lot in getting my health back and it seems to be the only way I can loose weight. I cut out all bread, pasta, rice and almost all fruit from my diet for the time being. Cutting down carbs will help you avoid sugar cravings and it also seems to help balance out hormonal issues.

lola9007
05-17-2013, 05:49 PM
Expense with paleo can be an issue for some, especially those living in "food deserts" who generally have access to food from fast food restaurants and convenience stores (7-eleven). This is why obesity and obesity-related diseases correlate so strongly with poverty. People who can't afford to eat real food have no choice but to eat the cheapest food stuffs- refined grains like white bread and ramen noodles, rice, corn and sugar. The cheapest foods also happen to be what causes obesity/overweight in the first place because they are only refined carbohydrates that get stored as fat while not giving any nutrition for all those calories, leaving you constantly hungry. A viscious cycle.

The food pyramid was created by the USDA. The USDA's number 1 product is grains. They must sell grains to the US population and what better way to do that than to tell everyone that grains are a major part of one's diet. Imagine if Coca-cola made a beverage pyramid. What do you think Coca-cola would tell everyone is the most important beverage to drink? That's right: coca-cola. The food pyramid is not based on nutritional science or historical records of what humans evolved to eat. It's based on selling a constant surplus of grains. The food pyramid has even been replaced by "my plate" so even the USDA has abandoned it. You should as well and replace it with a pyramid based on what humans evolved to eat, which is fatty meats fish poultry, veggies, a little fruit and nuts.

My diet is influenced by Paleo, in that I focus on fatty meats like juicy burgers, fish with skin and butter sauce, and beef, pork, lamb, and chicken pot roasts and bone broths that keep all the fat and juices of the meat in tact. These foods are incredibly nutrient dense, are delicious, and satisfy my appetite without having to eat a huge volume of food. I also avoid all bread and pastas because I have a gluten sensitivity. I minimize rice and corn as well because they have more calories than nutritional content. I maximize well-cooked veggies like potatoes, sweet potatoes, cooked greens, squashes, zuccini, peas, etc. And I eat a ton of full-fat dairy: cream, sour cream, cream cheese, grass-fed butter. I don't drink milk because of lactose intolerance.

I have lost nearly 25 lbs on this diet, kept it off for a year, and I continue to eat it today because it is delicious, satisfying, nutritious, and i never have to worry about the weight coming back. The reason eating lots of meat and fat and fewer carbs controls weight has to do with controlling your blood sugar. If you restrict carbs (mainly bread,pastas,cereals, sugar,corn, rice) your blood sugar remains stable, which doesn't trigger insulin. If you eat lots of carbs, insulin will come in to reduce your blood sugar, and store it as fat. Also, while insulin is active, your brain can't feel the satiety signal (from leptin), leaving you hungry, continuing to eat more carbs, and unable to burn the fat you already have- a viscous cycle.

My typical paleo-ish/low-carb/high-fat day:

breakfast: one egg w/ bacon or sausage w/potato or a little salad
lunch: pork ribs (with juices and fatty parts), cooked collard greens (in butter), beans cooked with pork, potato salad
dinner: rotisserie chicken (dark meat and skin) from the supermarket, instant mashed potatoes, creamy spinach

snacks: cashews, peanut butter, 99% chocolate, whole-fat chedder cheese stick,

I can basically eat however much meat and natural fat I want to without gaining weight. My body tells me when I am full. I no longer crave bread, sweets, or even ice cream anymore. I would eat ice cream if it came unsweetened, however.

The cons to this diet are: time spent cooking and better quality meat and dairy is more expensive.

BUT- you can do a low-carb, high-fat diet on fast food and processed food as well and make a difference in weight- it just won't be as healthy. For example, if you go to McDonalds, get the double burger with everything on it (skip the american cheese which is not even related to real cheese) and don't eat the bun. Get coffee with cream but no sugar. Get water instead of soda. Get a small fries instead of cookies or ice cream. For me, it's all about reaching for the fattiest option as a replacement for the sugary or carby option. That way I get satisfied and my blood sugar doesn't spike which allows my body to keep burning fat instead of storing it.

I hope this helps. PM me if you have other questions.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 06:02 PM
thanks everyone <3 i haven't read ALL of your responses yet, but i will. i'm thinking of trying the paleo diet for a few days just to see if i can do it, and if i can i'll stretch it to a week. but i don't think i wanna be no-carb, probably just lo-carb. i've been doing lo-calorie and it doesn't seem to be working, so it can't hurt to TRY.

ikesgirl80
05-17-2013, 06:31 PM
I eat Paleo-ish now. The main things that are NOT Paleo in my diet are honey, cheese, chocolate (the first 3, I eat daily), white potatoes/corn (on occasion).

Today I ate:

Bkf ~ 6 spears of asparagus wrapped with 1/2 slice of bacon, and baked, 1 orange, 1 homemade banana, walnut, and chocolate muffin made with almond flour.

Lunch ~ 2 veggie and turkey mini meatloaves, 1 grapefruit, 1 homemade banana, walnut, and chocolate muffin made with almond flour.

Snack ~ 2 -50 calorie applegate farms all natural turkey hot dogs with mustard (I usually don't do hot dogs, but we were going to have a cook out, and it got canceled).

Dinner ~ don't know yet, will decide after the gym!

Basically, once per month I make a huge batch of muffins for the bf and I and freeze what we don't need for the week. Every Sunday, I make my asparagus with bacon, and 2-3 main dishes (last week was chili, meatloaf, and sloppy joe (with manwich, not paleo, but it sounded good). Then on Tuesday and Wednesday I cook something for dinner. My rule is I cook and portion the food, we each warm up what we want for lunch and dinner each day.

Other favorites include homemade chicken and veggie soup, taco salad, cauliflower and cheese soup, stuffed cabbages w/o rice, spaghetti made with spaghetti squash instead of noodles. I make egg muffins for my bf with beaten eggs, meat, veggies. I put a 1/4 cup of the mixture in each muffin tin and bake them, and wrap in plastic wrap. They freeze well also.

kaplods
05-17-2013, 07:57 PM
FYI - there are a lot of low-cost recipes and meal ideas that are also low-carb, paleo, and semi-paleo the shoestring meals forum. Even though soy and legumes are usually not considered paleo (because they aren't edible raw), I do use tvp (textured vegetable protein) to extend ground beef. I can buy cheap ground beef and extend it with even cheaper tvp ( my recipes using tvp can be found in the shoestring meals forum).

I do make my own yogurt, which isn't strictly paleo, but I'm not willing to eat the paleo source for calcium and other minerals (such as insects and bones). I do make stock with animal bones (chicken carcass, ham bone, beef bones, even shrimp shells on the rare occasion we buy shrimp - usually from Aldi on sale).

The first paleo book I read (Neanderthin, I believe) allowed dairy as a substitute for insects and dirt (the paleo sources for these minerals), so whenever I've done paleo, I've used some dairy. I've stopped eating fresh dairy due to mild lactose problems.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 09:16 PM
FYI - there are a lot of low-cost recipes and meal ideas that are also low-carb, paleo, and semi-paleo the shoestring meals forum. Even though soy and legumes are usually not considered paleo (because they aren't edible raw), I do use tvp (textured vegetable protein) to extend ground beef. I can buy cheap ground beef and extend it with even cheaper tvp ( my recipes using tvp can be found in the shoestring meals forum).

I do make my own yogurt, which isn't strictly paleo, but I'm not willing to eat the paleo source for calcium and other minerals (such as insects and bones). I do make stock with animal bones (chicken carcass, ham bone, beef bones, even shrimp shells on the rare occasion we buy shrimp - usually from Aldi on sale).

The first paleo book I read (Neanderthin, I believe) allowed dairy as a substitute for insects and dirt (the paleo sources for these minerals), so whenever I've done paleo, I've used some dairy. I've stopped eating fresh dairy due to mild lactose problems.
is almond milk considered dairy, since it's a milk? i shouldn't think so but there's so much to know that i'm always unsure. i can eat ice cream and cheese and yoghurt, but milk itself makes me ill, i think i'm partially lactose intolerant. and i don't eat ANYTHING made with bones, it grosses me out. i also wouldn't eat the soup my grandma made once because she used a chicken neck in it, and the thought grossed me out. i'd actually like to go back to vegetarianism but i guess that with the paleo would be very difficult. are you allowed to take supplements of the paleo diet? like simple multivitamins and b vitamins? protein and iron pills?

TripSwitch
05-17-2013, 09:20 PM
is almond milk considered dairy, since it's a milk??

No... Almond "milk" is not dairy since it does not contain any actual milk from cows...

joefla70
05-17-2013, 09:22 PM
Nope. Almond milk is not dairy. I use the unsweetened vanilla (30 cal per cup) to make frozen yogurt, along with Fage' fat free Greek Yogurt.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 09:52 PM
i figured as much but ive been getting weird advice and information, like being told to completely cut out soy and all sorts of nuts and legumes, i've been told to eat nothing but apples for a week and run 5 miles a day while doing it... baaaaad advice. and i'm also getting conflicting answers about Agave Nectar. some people say "way better than sugar" and other people are like "omg there's so much fructose it's sooooo bad for you" =_=

zionkoach
05-17-2013, 09:55 PM
I lost 90 pounds on Paleo/Primal... I haven't been on it in the last few months while I get settled in a new state... but I am so ready to get back on it... yes it's more expensive... but no more than eating out all of the time... you just have to be sale conscious... and eat the fruits and veggies that are in season... I have about 80 more pounds to go... and this is how I will do it... eggs are cheap... eat lots of eggs... good luck!

TripSwitch
05-17-2013, 10:11 PM
My understanding of agave is that it's not much different to our body than HFCs... But I still use it on occasion... Although I do try to do my best to avoid HFCs.... So I guess I have a bit of a double standard going on.... :)

TripSwitch
05-17-2013, 10:14 PM
And yes.... Soy is the a "no-no" to the "paleo" people that I know... But I'm ok with some soy in my diet... And of course I know lots of people who consider themselves strict "paleo" but they still do things like drink beer and drink coffee, use some diary, honey, and maple syrup, and eat dark chocolate, etc...

Alyssa Autopsy
05-17-2013, 10:21 PM
haha yeah everyone is different so for all i know the agave nectar is a huge improvement for me and i'm just not noticing, or maybe i'll suddenly drop a bunch of weight at once after another week of restricting my calories to a deficit but not into starvation mode. my ED mind keeps telling me that starvation is fine and i can stop when i get to my goal weight... *shudders* i hate that part of my mind.

Wannabeskinny
05-18-2013, 09:07 AM
thanks everyone <3 i haven't read ALL of your responses yet, but i will. i'm thinking of trying the paleo diet for a few days just to see if i can do it, and if i can i'll stretch it to a week. but i don't think i wanna be no-carb, probably just lo-carb. i've been doing lo-calorie and it doesn't seem to be working, so it can't hurt to TRY.

Well hold on. If you don't know what a carb is then slow down a bit and find out before you go paleo.

The food pyramid is not necessarily the end all be all of nutrition. Personally I think the food pyramid is a crock of bull. It's constructed because the grain industry holds a lot of political clout. Nobody on earth needs to eat as much corn and wheat as is suggested in the food pyramid, your body just does not need it.

And if you can't figure out what to eat at breakfast that does not include pancakes and waffles then you are not ready to delve into a diet that you don't understand. Trust me, I've been there and I'm not trying to judge, just trying to be realistic. Nobody can break up with carbs easily.

Keep working on understanding the function of grains and carbs. Soon enough I started to realize that wheat made me hungry to eat more wheat, which made me hungry to eat more sugar. It was a destructive path. I eat a modified paleo, mostly low-carb diet because my body feels better this way.

A good breakfast for me is:
- hard boiled egg
- yogurt with almonds and fruit
- omelette with vegetables

No waffles, no pancakes, no cereal (any idea how much sugar is in every cereal????)

Alyssa Autopsy
05-18-2013, 11:44 AM
Well hold on. If you don't know what a carb is then slow down a bit and find out before you go paleo.

The food pyramid is not necessarily the end all be all of nutrition. Personally I think the food pyramid is a crock of bull. It's constructed because the grain industry holds a lot of political clout. Nobody on earth needs to eat as much corn and wheat as is suggested in the food pyramid, your body just does not need it.

And if you can't figure out what to eat at breakfast that does not include pancakes and waffles then you are not ready to delve into a diet that you don't understand. Trust me, I've been there and I'm not trying to judge, just trying to be realistic. Nobody can break up with carbs easily.

Keep working on understanding the function of grains and carbs. Soon enough I started to realize that wheat made me hungry to eat more wheat, which made me hungry to eat more sugar. It was a destructive path. I eat a modified paleo, mostly low-carb diet because my body feels better this way.

A good breakfast for me is:
- hard boiled egg
- yogurt with almonds and fruit
- omelette with vegetables

No waffles, no pancakes, no cereal (any idea how much sugar is in every cereal????)
Thanks, i'm planning on doing some research before I start anyway, your post is a bit helpful in that.

And really, even honey bunches of oats? I got that because it's honey as opposed to sugar o.O

kaplods
05-18-2013, 12:14 PM
Thanks, i'm planning on doing some research before I start anyway, your post is a bit helpful in that.

And really, even honey bunches of oats? I got that because it's honey as opposed to sugar o.O

Honey is sugar, and even if honey were better than sugar, if you read the label (label reading is important) you'll see that there's a LOT more sugar in Honey Bunches of Oats than honey.

Ingredients are listed in descending order of volume - and there are four sugars listed, sugar, brown sugar, honey, and barley syrup - meaning there's more white sugar than brown sugar, and more brown sugar than honey - probably a lot more.

The main ingredient isn't even oats as Corn and wheat are listed before oats, meaning that less than 1/3 of the grains used are oats (probably a lot less, because wheat and barley flours are also listed).

I'd recommend you read a book or two on basic nutrition and label-reading before trying paleo or any other specific "diet."

I would recommend your local library, as the librarians can help you find what you need. I have a list somewhere that I compiled for a friend, I'll see if I can find it.

JenMusic
05-18-2013, 12:17 PM
And really, even honey bunches of oats? I got that because it's honey as opposed to sugar o.O

Sugar is sugar, even with different names. :( Sugar, evaporated cane juice, honey, maple syrup, molasses, agave, anything ending in -ose . . . these are all, basically, sugar.

On the nutrition facts label, "Sugars" are separated out and that number includes any of the different names of sugar. That might help you figure out what really IS low sugar, and what is not.

merilung
05-18-2013, 01:45 PM
You can tailor a paleo principles to a vegetarian diet - whole9 has a shopping list for vegetarians and vegans here (http://whole9life.com/2012/03/paleo-nutrition-for-vegetarians/). Their shopping list emphasizes organic/pastured products, but don't stress about it if you can't work it into your budget. Even though there's plenty of fruit on their list, I'd still focus on vegetables and limit or eliminate fruit if I had severe budget restrictions.

Since other folks are sharing examples of their meals, here's a few different examples of typical meals for me:

Breakfasts


spinach/egg scramble, bacon, 'paleo' scone (made with almond flour) and strawberries
smoothie made with frozen bananas, almond butter, raw cacao powder, and coconut milk or whole milk or homemade keifer
avocado, shredded chicken, homemade salsa, and a fried egg


Lunches

intermittent Fasting (most common - I'm usually not hungry at this point in the day)
whey protein green smoothie
egg muffins and veggies (like these (http://paleospirit.com/2012/basic-paleo-egg-muffins/))
GIANT kale or spinach salad with whatever other veggies/proteins I have on hand and homemade olive oil/apple cider vinegar dressing


Dinners


lamb shoulder chop, baked sweet potato with butter, green vegetables
stir fry with ground beef or shredded chicken and veggies
summer sausage or liverwurst and homemade sauerkraut
roasted chicken with root veggies and homemade kale chips


Snacks

intermittent Fasting (most common - I don't snack much anymore when OP)
homemade unsweetened yogurt
homemade baba ghanouj with carrots or cucumbers
a square of very dark chocolate

pattygirl63
05-18-2013, 02:31 PM
Hey, Alyssa! Here are my thoughts and what's worked for me.

I became "accidentally low-carb" while I was losing weight - although I'm mainly a calorie counter, I realized over time that I was able to eat more filling food (for ME) when I ditched a lot of bready, starchy carbs and exchanged them for foods like lean meat, cheese, yogurt, olive oil, those types of foods. I also realized that my body actually felt better - more energy, more even mood, no blood sugar spikes, and fewer cravings. It wasn't all at once, but over time.

After all of that, THEN I started to discover this thing called Paleo, and it's cousin, Primal (which is a little more lenient with dairy and some other carbs). I still don't think of myself as following this path exclusively, but it's kind of my default.

I think people might be suggesting this kind of food plan for you because, simply by the elimination of a lot of those starchy carbs, overall calorie intake will fall without having to track calories (I saw the other thread where you talk about that).

Yes, in a lot of cases, starches are cheaper than a lot of other foods, certainly many proteins. But not all. The shoestring meals forum has TONS of ideas for low cost adaptations.

I'm underqualified to get into the FDA food pyramid discussion. :) I'm sure someone will chime in on that soon.

As far as what I eat on a day-to-day basis? Here's a sample, but PLEASE remember this is ME, and based on what I like. It's not the only way to do it.

Breakfast - Eggs with veggies and maybe some avocado.
Lunch - Some chicken breast or tuna or some other protein. A couple of cups of veggies, a TBS of olive oil.
Dinner - Ginormous salad with protein (veggie burger, or something else) with a few nuts.
Snacks/Dessert - Some berries, some Greek yogurt with flax, some mini cheeses.

Strict paleo frowns on dairy but cheese and yogurt seem fine for me.

Good luck!

Thanks so much for you explanation of Paleo vs Primal. I've been trying to figure out which one I'm interested. Primal is definitely doable for me. I also like a small amount of dairy in my plan.

Novus
05-18-2013, 03:38 PM
Wheat Belly is somewhat similar to Paleo/Primal in that you eliminate grains, but it's much less complicated and restrictive imo. You might want to research it as well.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-18-2013, 06:01 PM
thanks guys this is very illuminating. i guess i haven't really cut down on sugar as i thought i did, because i'm eating stuff loaded with it :< and that sucks cuz i LOVE cereal! i thought switching from lucky charms ot honey bunches of oats would be btter u.u

and yes i'm planning on doing a lot of research before trying it, i really don't think i'll be able to handle the sudden lack of carbs well, but my weight loss has completely stopped so it's time for a drastic change, as it looks like my small changes are no better than what i was doing before.

kaplods
05-19-2013, 12:10 AM
I don't think small changes are necessarily a bad idea for you. Your mistake wasn't in making small changes after all, it was in believing you were making a much greater change than you actually were, a problem that can be prevented with some very basic knowledge of basic nutrition and label reading.

Personally, I consider low-carb and Paleo to be more restrictive than most people need, and also more challenging to do well without a strong background in nutrition.
Paleo isn't a (as in one) diet. There are dozens of different plans that use the paleo label (for example, "primal" as in Mark Sisson's Primal Blueprint IS a paleo diet. So is Barbara Berkely's "primarian" diet described in her book, Refuse to Regain).

Because there are so many different Paleo diets, and some are more nutritionally sound and science-based than others, you need to have a good understanding of nutrition to evaluate the plan you're interested in.

From your posts, it doesn't sound like you have that yet. Gradual and/or small changes may be right for you, as long as you're making the changes that you think you are.

I recently read, Nutrition for Life: The no-fad, no-nonsense approach to eating well and reaching your healthy weight, by Lisa Hark and Darwin Deen.

It's easy to read and is laid out like a textbook (only interesting). It's also a fun read as the chapers are broken down into short sections. There's also a "diet directory" that lists and explains many popular diets, the pros and cons, and whether the diet is healthy in the long term.

Right now I'm reading The American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, it has TONS more information, but it's also a HUGE book, and may have more information than you actually want. It's almost like an encyclopedia (and the writing style isn't quite as entertaining.

Paleo theory departs from much of mainstream nutritional science - but I think you should know the rules before you break them.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-19-2013, 12:33 AM
I don't think small changes are necessarily a bad idea for you. Your mistake wasn't in making small changes after all, it was in believing you were making a much greater change than you actually were, a problem that can be prevented with some very basic knowledge of basic nutrition and label reading.

Personally, I consider low-carb and Paleo to be more restrictive than most people need, and also more challenging to do well without a strong background in nutrition.
Paleo isn't a (as in one) diet. There are dozens of different plans that use the paleo label (for example, "primal" as in Mark Sisson's Primal Blueprint IS a paleo diet. So is Barbara Berkely's "primarian" diet described in her book, Refuse to Regain).

Because there are so many different Paleo diets, and some are more nutritionally sound and science-based than others, you need to have a good understanding of nutrition to evaluate the plan you're interested in.

From your posts, it doesn't sound like you have that yet. Gradual and/or small changes may be right for you, as long as you're making the changes that you think you are.

I recently read, Nutrition for Life: The no-fad, no-nonsense approach to eating well and reaching your healthy weight, by Lisa Hark and Darwin Deen.

It's easy to read and is laid out like a textbook (only interesting). It's also a fun read as the chapers are broken down into short sections. There's also a "diet directory" that lists and explains many popular diets, the pros and cons, and whether the diet is healthy in the long term.

Right now I'm reading The American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, it has TONS more information, but it's also a HUGE book, and may have more information than you actually want. It's almost like an encyclopedia (and the writing style isn't quite as entertaining.

Paleo theory departs from much of mainstream nutritional science - but I think you should know the rules before you break them.
Well i've studied a bit about nutrition, but the details aren't sticking. I have a learning disorder, so it takes me a very long time to remember things. I do know veggies are good, fruits should be moderated due to sugar,and eggs have a lot of cholesterol, and my smoking is depleting my magnesium which is what's causing my chocolate cravings...

What kinds of small changes should I make now? This is what i've done so far:

Switched from soymilk with chocolate syrup to almond milk with a carnation breakfast drink.
Replaced chocolate chip cookies with oats and honey granola bars.
Replaced sugar with ORGANIC agave nectar.
Switched from canola oil to olive oil.
Switched from butter to olive oil "buttery spread".
Changed to olive oil mayo.
Switched fried chicken for baked.
Switched from fish sticks to seasoned tilapia.
Switched from potato chips to dried veggie slices.
Reduced portion sizes: example one chicken breast with veggies instead of 2 legs and a thigh with mashed potatoes, half a sandwich instead of a whole, one egg on dry toast instead of 2 eggs with 2 slices of toast with butter and preserves on it.
Switched from Lucky Charms to Honey Bunches of Oats.
Stopped eating or drinking anything with aspartame.
Don't eat gelatin at all, or soups made with animal bones.
Try very, very hard to avoid HFCS and related products.


I think those are a lot of good changes, yet i've been at 185ish pounds for quite a while now. I ate exactly 3 meals and one snack today, I feel totally full. Just to see what I had today (this is not a typical day, I was out of the house all day so had to do dining out).

Breakfast: 2 pieces "buttered" toast and 1/2 cup yoghurt with 1 tbsp strawberries
Lunch: 1/2 a sweet onion chicken teriyaki sub from subway
Dinner: 3 chicken tenders and a handful of fries.
Snack: 1 carnation drink and 1 fiber one brownie.

Unfortunately we are completely out of fruit and veggies, otherwise I would have had some veg with some light ranch dressing, we have to go to the grocer tomorrow. And after every meal and after my snack, I felt completely full to bursting.

Obviously a lot of carbs, which is the whole reason i'm researching Paleo. I've done restrictive dieting before, and I know I can do it again, but I need to get more information before I try it. I've read a couple articles, but now that they're closed I can't remember a damn thing except that in the hunter-gatherer times we really didn't eat grains. At least with getting advice here I can simply go to my subscribed threads and look back over the information given.

Jez
05-19-2013, 12:40 AM
thanks everyone <3 i haven't read ALL of your responses yet, but i will. i'm thinking of trying the paleo diet for a few days just to see if i can do it, and if i can i'll stretch it to a week. but i don't think i wanna be no-carb, probably just lo-carb. i've been doing lo-calorie and it doesn't seem to be working, so it can't hurt to TRY.
VERRRRY few people are "no carb". I see that thrown around a lot, right along with all the myths about how low carb diets omit vegetables, etc.


thanks guys this is very illuminating. i guess i haven't really cut down on sugar as i thought i did, because i'm eating stuff loaded with it :< and that sucks cuz i LOVE cereal! i thought switching from lucky charms ot honey bunches of oats would be btter u.u

and yes i'm planning on doing a lot of research before trying it, i really don't think i'll be able to handle the sudden lack of carbs well, but my weight loss has completely stopped so it's time for a drastic change, as it looks like my small changes are no better than what i was doing before.
As others have said, sugar is not going to only be listed as sugar/sucrose. Carbohydrates are either fiber or sugar. Look at the total carbohydrates and subtract the fiber. What ever is left is going to be sugar or turned into sugar shortly.

I also think that too many people think paleo/primal is a diet in the way South Beach/Atkins/IP/etc. are "diets". Paleo/primal are based on health and biologically appropriate diets, not weight loss. Weight loss just tends to come with living healthier. This is not something that someone would want to do short-term, thinking it's a weight loss plan. It's not.

mariposssa
05-19-2013, 01:09 AM
I believe that even the government is beginning to see the error of its ways in respect to the food pyramid. They are now promoting that perfect portion plate thing where fruits & veggies equals half your plate instead of the pyramid. At least this is what the speaker who came to a TOPS meeting I attended said. She was one of the "nutrition counselors" who worked for the govt advising/teaching courses for Food Stamp and WIC recipients.

The accepted items on WIC have changed to include produce in exchange for some of the grains/cereals/etc that used to be included with the vouchers.

mariposssa
05-19-2013, 01:17 AM
I meant to include this link from USDA gov site.

http://www.choosemyplate.gov/myplate/index.aspx

Wannabehealthy
05-19-2013, 07:52 AM
Just to see what I had today (this is not a typical day, I was out of the house all day so had to do dining out).

Breakfast: 2 pieces "buttered" toast and 1/2 cup yoghurt with 1 tbsp strawberries
Lunch: 1/2 a sweet onion chicken teriyaki sub from subway
Dinner: 3 chicken tenders and a handful of fries.
Snack: 1 carnation drink and 1 fiber one brownie.



I would try to wean myself off the toast in the morning. You could choose egg, bacon or sausage. The fat in them would keep you from getting hungry.

Also, if you go to Subway, you can get a salad instead of a sandwich. it contains all the same things as the sandwich but they give you more lettuce and no bun.

I am not familiar with carnation drink, so check the ingredients label for a carb and sugar count. Maybe you could buy a can of whey protein powder and make your own shakes. The initial cost would be high, but you get a lot of shakes out of a can of powder mix. Be careful not to use this along with a meal....they can be high in calories. They should be used as a meal replacement. You could probably make a half portion as a snack. And you have to check the carb and sugar count on them. It can vary by brands.

Wannabeskinny
05-19-2013, 09:06 AM
And really, even honey bunches of oats? I got that because it's honey as opposed to sugar o.O

As others have said, yes even honey bunches of oats is not really good for you. In fact I recently went down the cereal aisle and looked through all the cereals trying to find one without sugar. The only ones I found were grape nuts and shredded wheat. That's it!

What it sounds like to me is that you are still in the stage of falling for what looks and sounds like it's healthy. So what if you're using organic agave nectar? That's still sugar! So you think you're making a good choice by switching from butter (which is a real food) to buttery spread? (which is a processed food!). What the heck is a "seasoned tilapia?" sounds like a frozen packaged food. The only ingredient in that should be "tilapia" - anything else and it's a processed food.

Don't fall for the gimmicks. Tried to read a few things by Michael Pollan. He advocates eating real food. Your diet consists of so much processed food.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-19-2013, 10:30 AM
As others have said, yes even honey bunches of oats is not really good for you. In fact I recently went down the cereal aisle and looked through all the cereals trying to find one without sugar. The only ones I found were grape nuts and shredded wheat. That's it!

What it sounds like to me is that you are still in the stage of falling for what looks and sounds like it's healthy. So what if you're using organic agave nectar? That's still sugar! So you think you're making a good choice by switching from butter (which is a real food) to buttery spread? (which is a processed food!). What the heck is a "seasoned tilapia?" sounds like a frozen packaged food. The only ingredient in that should be "tilapia" - anything else and it's a processed food.

Don't fall for the gimmicks. Tried to read a few things by Michael Pollan. He advocates eating real food. Your diet consists of so much processed food.
Seasoned Tilapia is just that- seasoned fish. I but the fish, I season it, I cook it.

The olive oil spread is much lower calorie than butter, and tastes better, too.

What should I be using instead of sugar and Agave Nectar then?

Alyssa Autopsy
05-19-2013, 12:19 PM
i am attempting a no/lo-carb day to see how i feel throughout the day. if i feel better i'll research even more and maybe even design a 3 days worth of no/lo-carb meals and a shopping list, and if i really do feel better i'll think about making a permanent lo-carb change, substituting extra steamed veg for my usual rice or pasta, and maybe having 2 eggs in the morning instead of 1 egg and a slice of toast.

just to keep track i will edit this post with what i eat throughout the day, and hopefully someone will read my log and tell me if i'm doing well or not~ i'm not including the calories though, as calorie counting is emotionally harmful to me.







TODAY'S TRY-IT-ON TRACKING
Breakfast: 2 cups coffee, with 1/2 tsp agave nectar and a splash of creamer for each, 1 egg over easy, 1 slice lo-sodium bacon.
Snack: 1 Orange, Apple Juice (the juice has carbs in it, but I figured since it was from fruit juice with no sugar or anything added, it would be okay, plus i'm only having a few sips as opposed to the whole bottle)
Lunch: salad with lettuce, cucumber, carrot, broccoli, cauliflower, olives, and light ranch dressing; handful cashews
Snack: 3 pieces dark chocolate with caramel, handful blueberries
Dinner: Tuna with olive oil mayo
Before-Bed Snack: 1 scrambled egg with 1/4 slice cheese, 2 slices lo-sodium bacon

Notes: Didn't think to check the carbs on JUICE, but i only had a few mouthfuls. also didn't know what to eat before bed, so i asked le boyfriend what HE wanted, and he wanted eggs and bacon, so that's what i decided to have, too. I am going to eat normally (though i will try not to inhale potato chips or sandwiches) this week, but will be planning a shopping list for next weekend to go low carb. i am not cutting out completely, i'll still eat my apples, and my fiber one brownies don't have many carbs, but i'm going to make a conscious effort to watch the carbs.

kaplods
05-19-2013, 12:48 PM
Seasoned Tilapia is just that- seasoned fish. I but the fish, I season it, I cook it.

The olive oil spread is much lower calorie than butter, and tastes better, too.

What should I be using instead of sugar and Agave Nectar then?

Agave nectar is very similar to high fructose corn syrup (possibly worse for you than white sugar).

There are two lines of thought in paleo when it comes to sweeteners. 1. Don't use any - it will retrain your tastebuds and fruit will be your only sweet treat (and you may have to be careful not to overeat it). 2. Use stevia (a plant-based low-cal sweetener), Splenda, aspartame if your body can handle it, and small amounts of sugar alcohols such as xylitol (birch sugar) and others (often ending in -itol).

Go easy on the -itols, because they aren't all zero-calorie, and the can have a laxative effect, causing diarrhea, especially if eaten in significant quantities.

I do use sweeteners, mostly xylitol and Splenda, but also monkfruit sweeteners (available in many low-carb online stores, and in many grocery stores (often blended with another sweetener because monkfruit is expensive and somewhat bitter, and I even use aspartame (because I've experimented and notice no symptoms and I've read a lot of the research, and I'm satisfied that it's safe in the quantities I use it).

I would encourage you to find and buy a basic nutrition book like Nutrition for Life. It's written in a very readable and easy format ( and it's available at amazon.com for a reasonable cost, especially if you buy used and/or a previous edition). The sections are very short and it's almost magazine-style with a lot of full-color photos on every page, so it's fun and interesting to read. The table of contents and index can help you find what you're interested in, so it's a good book to keep to look up stuff.

A lot of people have trouble getting nutrition information to "stick," because there's so much false and misleading information out there - especially from food makers in commercials, because they want us to believe that their foods are healthier than they really are.

Wannabeskinny
05-19-2013, 01:26 PM
Seasoned Tilapia is just that- seasoned fish. I but the fish, I season it, I cook it.

The olive oil spread is much lower calorie than butter, and tastes better, too.

What should I be using instead of sugar and Agave Nectar then?

In order to make it "taste better" and be lower calorie it's made up of all kinds of non-food type preservatives. I try to avoid processed foods whenever I can and this is at the top of the list of processing.

Sorry, there is no substitute for sugar. I avoid all sugars and sweeteners, I can't drop a single pound if I eat any kind of sugar, honey, or agave. Even artificial sweeteners make me crave sugar. Plus sugar makes you crave more sugar. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0zD1gj0pXk&list=PL39F782316B425249 I've learned to live without, that way I don't have to fight cravings all the time. I haven't had sugars or sweeters in my coffee in a few years, it IS possible.

kaplods
05-19-2013, 05:09 PM
In order to make it "taste better" and be lower calorie it's made up of all kinds of non-food type preservatives. I try to avoid processed foods whenever I can and this is at the top of the list of processing.

I think you're misunderstanding op about the seasoned tilapia, she's buying unseasoned, plain tilapia and is seasoning it herself.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-19-2013, 05:15 PM
I think you're misunderstanding op about the seasoned tilapia, she's buying unseasoned, plain tilapia and is seasoning it herself.

yep. i try to avoid stuff like that, i like sauced veggies that you can get in the frozen veg section, but today i put it back and bought some broccoli/cauliflower/carrot mix instead. i can eat 2 cups of veg as a snack easily, if it's the right type that i enjoy. i get that specific mix because my boyfriend and i both like it, and it has no onions or peppers in it.

Wannabeskinny
05-20-2013, 07:36 AM
I think you're misunderstanding op about the seasoned tilapia, she's buying unseasoned, plain tilapia and is seasoning it herself.

I was talking about the "buttery spread"

Alyssa Autopsy
05-20-2013, 09:02 AM
I was talking about the "buttery spread"

but it's made with olive oil, isn't that better than it being regular margarine?

Wannabeskinny
05-20-2013, 09:12 AM
but it's made with olive oil, isn't that better than it being regular margarine?

What brand are you using?

Novus
05-20-2013, 09:23 AM
but it's made with olive oil, isn't that better than it being regular margarine?

Margarine, in any form, is a highly processed food that is not healthy. Read this article (http://wellnessmama.com/2193/why-you-should-never-eat-vegetable-oil-or-margarine/) about how margarine is made. Or google for more info about the manufacturing process of margarine.

Butter, on the other hand, is just churned milk. It's such a simple food that you can make it in your own kitchen.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-20-2013, 04:41 PM
What brand are you using?
Smart Balance

Wannabeskinny
05-20-2013, 05:58 PM
Smart Balance

Ick. I'll add to Novus' excellent post by adding this about "smart" balance http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/there-is-nothing-smart-about-smart-balance/

Alyssa Autopsy
05-21-2013, 10:02 PM
Ick. I'll add to Novus' excellent post by adding this about "smart" balance http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/there-is-nothing-smart-about-smart-balance/

oh god
i think i'll have to start getting real butter
i'm sick of false advertising for "health" foods

PaleoPeanut
05-22-2013, 01:34 PM
My food rules:

If I can't pronounce all of the ingredients listed on the food's label, it goes right back onto the grocery store's shelf and NOT into my grocery basket.

If it doesn't have a label (because it's a piece of fruit or a veggie in the produce section) it goes right into my cart.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-22-2013, 02:14 PM
My food rules:

If I can't pronounce all of the ingredients listed on the food's label, it goes right back onto the grocery store's shelf and NOT into my grocery basket.

If it doesn't have a label (because it's a piece of fruit or a veggie in the produce section) it goes right into my cart.

i can pronounce some very difficult words xD

anyway, once i start the paleo thing i will be using normal butter for cooking (i read not to COOK with olive oil, though you can have it on salad) and my unsweetened almond milk in my coffee. i already stopped putting sugar and agave nectar in and am currently using sweetened creamer, but like i said once my new regime starts that's going to be out of the picture too.


am i still able to have small amounts of cheese? for instance, my breakfast today was 1 egg with spices and 1/4 slice cheese with 2 slices of bacon. i'm not the biggest fan of eggs plain, but i can easily stop all cheese intake if it's necessary, i know i'll get used to the egg getting blander, just as i'm letting myself slowly get used to less-sweet coffee. and speaking of, is coffee even allowed on the paleo diet? i'd really like to not have to give up my coffee.

Alyssa Autopsy
05-22-2013, 03:25 PM
There are plenty of websites that argue the virtues of primal/paleo. (this (http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/#axzz2TW7BSDJI) is a good, accessible place to start, IMO. Paleo Parents also has a good 'Paleo 101' guide including budget tips here (http://paleoparents.com/start-here/start-here-paleo-parents-101/) and I love many of the recipes on their website.

Most of us eating paleo/primal aren't perfect - we're just doing the best we can with what we have - and I don't know a lot of folks who follow the ideal to a T 100% of the time. My husband and I feel better the closer to perfect paleo we get and we strive to make meat, vegetables, and quality fats the staples of our diet.

Some folks find they spend more money eating paleo (or paleo-ish), but our food expenses actually went down after transitioning, largely because I wasn't hungry all the time and needed less food. We spend about $600 a month to feed two adults (and my husband has high caloric needs and eats far more food than one normal person) and a large dog, and we buy mostly grassfed meat and organic dairy. I'm pretty sure I could do Paleo on $200/mo. assuming I was only feeding myself. If I simply couldn't get enough calories on that budget, I'd incorporate small amounts of quinoa or rice.

I make my own yogurt out of whole milk, I make my own bone broth out of scraps from other meals (a whole chicken feeds us FOREVER after we make soup out of the carcass!), I make my own sauces out of farmer's market seconds which are often free. I render my own tallow and use that or saved bacon fat for cooking. Organ meats are often cheap and are nutrient dense. Tough cuts of boiling meat are cheap and make a lovely stew dinner. I already buy vegetables mostly on sale and a minimal amount of fruit - if I was on a tighter budget, I'd prioritize nutrient dense vegetables (spinach, kale, etc.) and cut out fruit entirely. Sweet Potatoes are a good high-calorie add-in if your diet is looking a little on the light side.

And honestly, I have a hard time envisioning a much easier diet. I do a lot of kitchen work because I enjoy it and it provides us with a wide variety, but during busy times it's SUPER easy to throw some ground meat, kale, and onions in a pan and cook until done. No mess, no fuss!
thank you so much for the links, i've been reading the daily apple

FrecklesTX
05-26-2013, 12:48 AM
I fry my eggs in butter and over medium...i cut the fried egg before I eat it so the pieces of egg white are coated with the rich egg yolk and it is so good, I don't need cheese. Just some pepper and a wee bit of salt.

AA - weight loss is a process and there is a learning curve. I think you're doing great. As long as you keep educating yourself, all your baby steps will pay off. ::)

Alyssa Autopsy
06-03-2013, 12:28 PM
I fry my eggs in butter and over medium...i cut the fried egg before I eat it so the pieces of egg white are coated with the rich egg yolk and it is so good, I don't need cheese. Just some pepper and a wee bit of salt.

AA - weight loss is a process and there is a learning curve. I think you're doing great. As long as you keep educating yourself, all your baby steps will pay off. ::)

thanks <3 i am educating myself daily ^^ i really want the health aspects of the diet over the weightloss, but i've been obsessed with weightloss my whole life so it's hard not to pay attention to the numbers on the scale.