Food Talk And Fabulous Finds - Salt tooth?




View Full Version : Salt tooth?


odalisque
04-06-2011, 09:07 PM
I'm having trouble controlling my sodium intake. I've found that it's in everrrrrrrything, even foods you wouldn't really expect. I'm usually over the daily recommended limit of 2,300 mg.
How do I eat less salt without having my food taste like cardboard? I seem to have a salt addiction like others have sugar addictions! What are some ways of making food taste good without overdoing it on sodium?


AnnieDrews
04-06-2011, 09:41 PM
Hi! I try to watch my sodium, but am not fanatical about it. One thing I have noticed is this: lots of things (especially fresh veggies) really taste great without salt. I like them steamed or roasted, although I usually add a sprinkle when I roast them. Another thing that tastes good: no-salt-added canned corn. If you compare it with the salt-added variety, there is a huge difference. You can really taste the crispness and sweetness in the no-salt so much better.

One thing my fiance's doctor told him about sodium is this: It really isn't the table salt that is worrisome. It is the added salt/sodium hidden in processed foods that really add up. I have cut back on processed foods and I think it has helped.

We do need flavor in life, we just need to find a happy medium.

Try using less salt when you cook your food. You may find you really don't miss it all that much. Also cut back on processed foods.

Nola Celeste
04-06-2011, 09:48 PM
Honestly, I just don't worry about sodium intake. My blood pressure's good and getting better, I don't appear to be salt-sensitive, and I drink plenty of water to keep me hydrated.

If you like salt and it doesn't cause you any health issues, why are you concerned about cutting back? We're designed to excrete excess sodium, so unless you're taking the top off your salt shaker to dump the stuff on your food, your body (and your doctor) will tell you if you're unable to shed the excess for some reason.

If you want to cut down on salt, though, try adding more aromatic vegetables like onions and garlic to your food. Add more herbs and spices than you normally do to compensate for the subtler flavor of less salty food. Citrusy and bitter tastes also help substitute for saltiness to some extent.

If you cook from scratch, you'll find you wind up consuming much less sodium than you would in prepared foods. A lot of packaged foods get a big dose of salt and of preservatives that contain sodium to lengthen their shelf lives; if you're cooking at home, you probably aren't using nearly as much salt as manufacturers do.

I am totally with you on the salty stuff. I think I could live the rest of my life without eating another bite of ice cream if I had to, but do NOT stand between me and a cracker. :D


tommy
04-06-2011, 09:58 PM
totally on the same track as Nola Celeste above

Smashley
04-07-2011, 09:15 PM
I used to be hooked on salt, it was a bad habit. On my last Doctor visit I was told I had high blood pressure (at 26 yrs old!!!) and curbing my salt would make a big impact. I just learned to live without it. I eat clean as much as possible, so that means nothing processed and in its natural state. I learned to live without salt, and I don't really miss it. I substitute with plenty of herbs and spices and try different variations. Try spices, herbs or lemon juice.

anna ng
04-08-2011, 11:59 AM
2,300 of sodium is an entire teaspoon of salt, so my guess is that this isn't just from salt you're shaking on top of your food or using in cooking. I suspect that a lot of it is coming from highly processed foods. Basically, there are three things that make food taste really good: fat, sugar, and salt. Because the first two are high in calories, manufacturers of "light" products use salt to try to trick us into thinking their food is tasty.

The best way to lower your sodium is to eat, as much as possible, foods you've cooked yourself from unprocessed ingredients. If you're eating a lot of frozen dinners or canned soups or premade sauces, that's where the sodium is coming from. You can make the same foods yourself with far less salt, and then store portions in the fridge or freezer to eat later.

You might, however, conclude that you don't care about the sodium. If your blood pressure is good and you drink a lot of water, your body may just be handling the salt. But if you want to reduce it, try to make more of your own food. Then, you can make it as salty as you like using the salt shaker without also eating the hidden salt that commercial products have. Good luck!

Munchy
04-11-2011, 02:20 PM
2,300 of sodium is an entire teaspoon of salt, so my guess is that this isn't just from salt you're shaking on top of your food or using in cooking. I suspect that a lot of it is coming from highly processed foods. Basically, there are three things that make food taste really good: fat, sugar, and salt. Because the first two are high in calories, manufacturers of "light" products use salt to try to trick us into thinking their food is tasty.

The best way to lower your sodium is to eat, as much as possible, foods you've cooked yourself from unprocessed ingredients. If you're eating a lot of frozen dinners or canned soups or premade sauces, that's where the sodium is coming from. You can make the same foods yourself with far less salt, and then store portions in the fridge or freezer to eat later.

You might, however, conclude that you don't care about the sodium. If your blood pressure is good and you drink a lot of water, your body may just be handling the salt. But if you want to reduce it, try to make more of your own food. Then, you can make it as salty as you like using the salt shaker without also eating the hidden salt that commercial products have. Good luck!

Absolutely! anna ng is wise! :)