Weight Loss Support - Too much protein?




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utgirl09
05-29-2009, 12:38 AM
I have been tracking my calories on livestrong.com/thedailyplate for the last 2 weeks. I have noticed that most days I have ate about 1 1/2 to 2 times the amount of protein that I should be having. Most days my carb intake has been low, like 70-80% of where it should be. I am gradually adding more and more veggies to every meal, so I know that number will increase more as I add more, but my concern is can I have too much protein? I remember reading somewhere that if you eat to much protein and not enough calcium, it can start to weaken your bones. I feel that I do get plenty of calcium though. So should I start cutting down on boneless skinless chicken? I just never thought I would have a problem eating to much protein.:?:


ROFL
05-29-2009, 12:48 AM
How much protein do you take in /day?

utgirl09
05-29-2009, 12:57 AM
One day I have 50g, every other day it has been between 75-100g. I am basing the percentage on what thedailyplate tells me.


mandalinn82
05-29-2009, 01:19 AM
That's what I eat, and my bones are strong and healthy, as far as I know. 100g or more a day of protein is my goal. If you're satisfied and feel good, just let it be.

utgirl09
05-29-2009, 01:21 AM
Okay, thanks, that makes me feel much better!

Heather
05-29-2009, 08:00 AM
You can figure your protein as a percentage of the calories you are eating. Every gram of protein has 4 calories. I think the daily recs for protein are pretty low (around 10% of calories). Many of us routinely eat 25-30% of calories from protein -- to feel full or to build muscle. Unless you have kidney problems eating even that much protein shouldn't be a problem...

Kootch
05-29-2009, 09:41 AM
I've been researching a fair bit and my goal is a 40/40/20 split of calories from protein/carbs/healthy fats. I even try to swing it so that protein comes out ahead of carbs, as often as possible.

I look at it this way: Protein builds muscle. Muscle, even in a resting state, burns calories. Therefore lots of protein can help you lose weight!

JulieJ08
05-29-2009, 10:07 AM
Protein is necessary to build muscle. But I don't know where the idea that *eating* protein builds muscle comes from.

Kootch
05-29-2009, 10:25 AM
Protein is necessary to build muscle. But I don't know where the idea that *eating* protein builds muscle comes from.

Really?? Protein is the cornerstone to growth, repair, and maintenance of muscle. Especially when combined with some form of working out.

As you build muscle, your resting metabolic rate increases, ramping up your weight loss.

annie175
05-29-2009, 10:43 AM
My doc has me eating 70g of protein daily.

beerab
05-29-2009, 11:22 AM
50-100 g I'd say is about average- I thought you were going to say you ate over 200 grams a day or something. My spark people recommends at least 60 grams a day.

WarMaiden
05-29-2009, 11:47 AM
I eat about 150 grams of protein per day.

mandalinn82
05-29-2009, 12:01 PM
To clarify the whole muscle/protein question, you can't build muscle without some serious strength training...but if you're doing that strength training and NOT getting the protein you need, you won't be able to build muscle. So protein intake is one necessary thing for muscle building, as is some form of strength training that microtears muscle so it needs to be rebuilt stronger.

Mrs Snark
05-29-2009, 12:11 PM
Protein is necessary to build muscle. But I don't know where the idea that *eating* protein builds muscle comes from.

I doubt anyone thinks just eating protein will suddenly cause new muscle growth. Alot of people shorten the concept that protein is a necessary nutritional component for building muscle by saying "Protein builds muscle", as Kootch did. But I don't think he means that just eating protein makes it happen.

But hey, it would be so nice if that were true, eh? ;)

Water25
05-29-2009, 12:11 PM
For your weight and height, and if you are exercising/weight training, you actually might want to eat more protein.
It depends on what you are trying to do to your body composition.

mayness
05-29-2009, 12:13 PM
The US recommendation for minimum protein intake is 0.8g of protein per kg of body weight... so at 97 kg, your minimum intake should be 77.6. So it sounds like you're in a good range! (The WHO minimum is only 0.45g protein per kg body weight, so even on your low days you're probably still at a healthy level.)

A lot of weight-loss plans recommend much higher protein intake than this anyway... I think it's because 1) if you're working out harder you're probably building some muscle so *maybe* you'll need the extra, 2) if you replace some fat with protein, you'll be eating less calories (4/g for protein vs 9/g for fat), and 3) protein tends to make you feel more full than carbs, or feel full longer, so replacing carbs with proteins may lead to eating less.

utgirl09
05-29-2009, 12:15 PM
I was worried because thedailyplace recommended only 50g of protein. I have been doing a strength training class 3 days a week, so I am glad to know that I am getting the right amount of protein. So hopefully when the fat finally does come off, I will have some muscle tone lurking beneath!

sunnywarmth
05-29-2009, 12:18 PM
I am currently on a high protein--100 to 120 gms per day, low carb, low fat diet. I have never felt better. As very high protein can sometimes raise havoc on kidneys, I make sure to have serum and urine studies done every 6 months. So far no problems. Muscle is preserved and fat is lost with this type of diet and unless I begin not to feel well, I plan to continue this regime until I reach goal. After that, I will lower the total protein intake. Best wishes on your journey. ;)

JulieJ08
05-29-2009, 12:42 PM
I'm not saying there's anything wrong with your diet. Your protein intake may be just fine

But saying there's no problem with your level of protein intake because your kidneys test fine is like saying there's nothing wrong with your hypertension because your heart and kidneys test fine. The damage occurs over time.

Your diet may be fine, but the testing does nothing to prove it.

sunnywarmth
05-29-2009, 01:16 PM
I'm not saying there's anything wrong with your diet. Your protein intake may be just fine

But saying there's no problem with your level of protein intake because your kidneys test fine is like saying there's nothing wrong with your hypertension because your heart and kidneys test fine. The damage occurs over time.

Your diet may be fine, but the testing does nothing to prove it.

As mentioned, my kidney function is monitored and I am under a physician's care. I am more likely to follow his advice on this, than yours, but thank you for your input--always respected.

JulieJ08
05-29-2009, 01:47 PM
As mentioned, my kidney function is monitored and I am under a physician's care. I am more likely to follow his advice on this, than yours, but thank you for your input--always respected.

Of course. I don't believe I gave any advice :)

kiramira
05-29-2009, 02:17 PM
Hi there!
Most experts recommend around 7 grams of protein per every 20 lbs of body weight. Protein forms the building blocks for muscle, blood, and the immune system.
There are risks involved with having too much protein in your diet -- NOTE: these are medical issues that are proven, and are not an indictment of any particular diet!

If you have too much protein, you may develop osteoporosis over time because calcium is required to metabolize the protein. Alot of protein means that you need alot of calcium in your diet, and if it isn't there, your body will take the calcium from your bones making them weak. And you won't know this until you either break a wrist or a hip or something, or have bone density scans taken (which is what JulieJ08 was saying -- often the damage can't be assessed for years and kidney function tests may not identify this problem...)

Also, protein metabolism is hard on the kidneys because the byproducts of protein metabolism need to be flushed out of your system, putting your kidneys under stress and may put one at risk of dehydration. And, because the calcium concentrations in your urine rise as a result of protein metabolism, you may develop kidney stones.

Also, the pH of your blood changes, and you may see an increased level of uric acid in your blood. These uric acid crystals often precipitate out into joints causing a condition called gout, which is really painful.

So, there ARE risks involved when you eat too much protein. These are simply medical facts, not opinions. It just comes down to how much you are eating. And if you have kidney problems, seeking medical advice about your protein intake might be appropriate.

Kira

cfmama
05-29-2009, 04:41 PM
I eat around 100-120 grams a day... but I do eat a 1700 calorie diet and my protein rarely goes over 30%. It's not just how MANY grams of protein a day in my understanding is how much of a percentage it is in your diet. Am I right ladies?

kiramira
05-29-2009, 07:51 PM
Hi there!

Note: the following is not an indictment of any eating plan in particular.

I've heard both recommendations -- but the one consistent recommendation is the 7 grams per 20 lbs of body weight. The percentage of diet as protein varies from as low as 15% (Gail Butterfield, Ph.D., director of Nutrition Studies at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center) to 30% as a maximum (lots of others, including Dr. Barry Sears in the Zone Diet).

It seems to me, Ms cfmama, that you are on track with respect to the 30% max AND the daily requirements which for you are around 90-100g of protein. I think the 30% is a great guideline, and your stats show that CLEARLY, this is working for you!!!! And the health risks seem to be significant when excessive amounts of protein are ingested over long periods of time, which is something that you clearly aren't doing...

Kira

Cluciano
06-03-2009, 10:35 PM
i think ur fine i try to eat from 80 to 100 grams daily.

ICUwishing
06-04-2009, 08:15 AM
Hilary Swank was eating 210g of protein a day to get ready for Million Dollar Baby - some seriously awful-sounding stuff! Like raw fish/flaxseed oil/egg white shakes. Eek! I remember reading in a bodybuilding magazine that it was recommended that you eat 1g for each pound of LEAN BODY MASS for your goal weight - so if you were shooting for 20% body fat at 150 pounds, you'd eat 120g. This is assuming that your top goal is building muscle and you're working out enough to support the calorie intake. We have some bodybuilders here in the forum - maybe they could clarify?