3 Fat Chicks on a Diet Weight Loss Community  

Go Back   3 Fat Chicks on a Diet Weight Loss Community > Maintainers > The Maintenance Library

The Maintenance Library books, articles, and book discussions

TFL Key #4: Accept The Food Facts

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-30-2005, 07:39 PM   #1
Meg
Senior Member
 
Meg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 9,846

S/C/G: 257/135/maintaining

Height: 5' 4"

Default TFL Key #4: Accept The Food Facts

Key To Success #4: Accept The Food Facts

Key #4 moves from the weight loss phase (Key #3) to the maintenance phase of keeping the weight off for life. The critical point of this chapter is that maintainers:
Quote:
peacefully accept their new way of eating: they know that they can’t eat whatever they want, and know that they can’t go back to their old food habits. (p 97)
I agree that this is the fundamental truth of maintenance – there’s no going back. Ever.

Just as there are many ways to lose weight, there are many valid ways to maintain a weight loss. Maintenance is going to be as personal and unique as the way you lost the weight in the first place. However, the book (pp 102-120) comes up with eight universal truths - ‘food facts’ - that successful maintainers have discovered and these make up the heart of the chapter:
  • Food Fact #1: The masters stop seeing the way they eat as dieting. 'Diet' has become a dirty word these days, but all it means is ‘a way of life’, from the Greek word diaitia. Your new way of eating has to become a way of life because it’s going to be for the rest of your life. In reality, the ‘diet’ is never over.
  • Food Fact #2: The masters survive the transition from weight loss to maintenance. How to adjust your eating plan once you reach goal is a matter of trial and error.
  • Food Fact #3: The masters see the beauty of low-fat eating. 90% of maintainers say that they follow a low-fat diet, with about 20-30% of total calories coming from fat.
  • Food Fact #4: The masters develop – and enjoy – new tastes in food. Successful maintainers find ways to enjoy what they eat, through ‘eating big’ strategies, trying new recipes, or simply re-learning how good healthy food can taste.
  • Food Fact #5: The masters develop consistency in their way of eating. Successful maintainers eat regular, frequent, planned meals. NWCR members report eating on an average of five times per day. 96% eat breakfast.
  • Food Fact #6: The masters keep track of what they eat. Keeping a food diary continues to be an important weight control tool, even in maintenance. Maintainers still have to exercise portion control.
  • Food Fact #7: The masters indulge themselves but spend their calories wisely. Many maintainers chose to occasionally indulge in their favorite foods but still control access to tempting foods and make trade-offs about how they spend their calories.
  • Food Fact #8: The masters try to listen to their bodies. Maintainers try to eat only when hungry but at the same time try not to let themselves get too hungry.

I thought of our Karen (MrsJim) when I read the next section: It Gets Easier With Time (pp 122-123). The book confirms what Karen’s always told us – maintaining a weight loss gets easier with passing time. A NWCR study found that those maintaining losses for 6+ years report that it takes significantly less effort to maintain that it does for those who are two or three years out from goal. And the pleasure derived from maintenance was actually found to increase over time! There’s evidence that it’s a bit harder for those of us who have lost a lot of weight to maintain the loss, but the good news is that the longer we maintain, the more likely we’ll be able to keep the weight off. In fact, the book says that maintaining a weight loss for 2 to 5 years decreased the risk of subsequent regain by more than 50%! More good reasons to stick around here.

No one interviewed for the book regretted any of the effort that it takes to keep the weight off. They all seem to take the ‘whatever it takes’ attitude that we’ve discussed here at Maintainers.

The chapter continues by profiling the lifestyle transformation of Graham Kerr, TV’s Galloping Gourmet (pp 124-126). Like many of us, he had a health epiphany and has devoted his life since then to creating food that is healthy and tastes good:
Quote:
Today, as he chooses his daily foods and designs his recipes, Kerr’s guiding question is, “what can I put in my body that will give me the most vitality and P.S. can it taste good, too?”
The end of the chapter is a review of low-fat eating (pp 126-128 and 139-149) and then it sets out a six–week ‘nondieting weight-control plan’ (pp 128-138). The six week plan simply takes the (old version) food pyramid and focuses on each of the six blocks in it for a week. It suggests ways to make small weekly changes in your eating to make it healthier without it being a ‘diet’ (back to the idea that ‘diet’ is a bad word). I’m not sure why this section isn’t included in Chapter 3 – which focused on weight loss – rather than this chapter, which more focuses on maintenance of a loss. Perhaps it would have made Chapter 3 too long? In any event, these sections don’t really add anything to our knowledge of maintenance skills, in my opinion.

What are your 'food facts'? What truths have you learned about maintenance? Was it a surprise to you that the diet is going to last forever? (it was to me!) Is maintenance getting easier for you over time? Can you ever see yourself going back to your old way of eating and gaining the weight back? Let's talk about maintenance!
__________________
Meg
Start: 257 - June 1, 2001
Goal: 135 - May 12, 2002
Size 22/size 4
Meg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2005, 09:09 PM   #2
Junior Member
 
talks2flowers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Barrie, ON
Posts: 27

Default

Quote:
peacefully accept their new way of eating: they know that they can’t eat whatever they want, and know that they can’t go back to their old food habits
I really did think that I was doing this but woke up before my alarm this morning after a nightmare about greasy french fries! I'm not sure what made me dream about this but perhaps I'm not as peaceful as I thought

I do enjoy the way that I eat now and I have to say that I positively 'bristle' if someone asks me how much longer I'll be on a diet or says that I've lost enough so why am I still watching what I eat?! Since fast food was my downfall, I pretty much avoid it. I was never into the "hard stuff" much, avoiding the drive thru windows but I often stopped at the corner for a sandwich and fries rather than cook dinner. Now when I feel the urge to be lazy about dinner, I head for the grocery store and grab one of those prepared veggie and fruit plates.

I don't keep a food journal anymore but I normally eat the same sorts of things over the course of a day or week, so I know pretty much that I'm on track (or not). I try to balance a day of heavier eating with a day of lighter eating. I guess if I find things getting out of control, I'd be quick to go back to journalling. It wasn't really all the difficult but I just got tired of writing down the same things over again. I know that oatmeal and a fruit is a perfectly reasonable breakfast for me and feel pretty secure without writing it now.

I still love to eat out at restaurants but I normally only do it as a treat once a week. I normally order something simple, without sauces or condiments like a steak and baked potato with salad and veggies. No more of those greasy, calorie laden meals! (I'm not such a cheap date anymore!)
__________________


Maintaining since November, 2004! Third time is the charm

Barb
talks2flowers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2005, 05:55 AM   #3
Meg
Senior Member
 
Meg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 9,846

S/C/G: 257/135/maintaining

Height: 5' 4"

Default Some Thoughts On Maintenance

I related to a lot of this chapter when I read it since I’m now about three years into maintenance (BTW, I still have to pinch myself when I type that! ) First of all, I do think that maintenance is getting easier, albeit s-l-o-w-l-y. When I look back and compare now to the first few months after I reached goal, yes, it’s easier but not for physical reasons – more from a psychological point of view. See, I felt SO unprepared for maintenance (we didn’t have the Maintainers Forum back then!) and worried that I’d somehow gain 50 pound overnight even if I kept on doing all the right things. I guess I didn’t have any confidence that I knew how to keep the weight off (by doing the same things that it took to lose it in the first place, as it turns out). So I’d freak out if the scale fluctuated by a few pounds or if I ate something that I shouldn’t and think that was the first step to total disaster. Experience has taught me that so long as I stay on track 95% of the time, the other 5% won’t derail me.

And maybe maintenance is getting easier from a purely physical aspect also. I’m starting to think that my body’s getting used to being at a normal weight. Certainly it LIKES being at a normal weight from all health indicators – I’m ridiculously healthy! All my numbers (BP, lipids, resting heart rate etc) are unbelievably good, even for someone half my age. In a tangent – isn’t it amazing that I could un-do so many years of abuse and neglect to my body -- in a YEAR? Wow! What a credit to our resilient bodies! To be able to go from obese couch potato to excellent health and fitness in a year?! By simply eating less and moving more? Who would have thought?? It's a Miracle Diet Secret!!

Anyway, back to maintenance. Three years of living maintenance every day has given me the confidence of knowing that the only way that I’ll gain the weight back is if I make a lot of really bad choices. I now know – beyond the shadow of a doubt - that the power to keep the weight off is totally in my hands. Regain isn’t going to happen to me passively; I would actively and consciously have to make bad decisions – ranging from not monitoring my weight to not exercising to eating the wrong foods – in order to put the weight back on. So knowing that keeping the weight off is completely under my control and in my hands makes maintenance a lot easier in my mind. I KNOW what to do to keep the weight off and I fully intend to keep doing it every day of my life. This new body (and new life) is a gift beyond compare and I’ll never ever choose to give it up.

How about the rest of you? Is maintenance getting easier?
__________________
Meg
Start: 257 - June 1, 2001
Goal: 135 - May 12, 2002
Size 22/size 4
Meg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2005, 09:14 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
ellis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Canada
Posts: 15,006

Height: 5'-2"

Default

I'm not at maintenance yet, but it all makes sense!
I have to tell you that, from where I'm sitting right now (60ish pounds overweight), I STILL have this feeling that once I lose the weight, I'll be able to go back to some of my old habits and really enjoy (read: pig out) myself.
But I know that's not going to be so.
__________________
I am a runner!

__________
"Wouldn't it be wonderful to take all the evil people and put them over there, then we wouldn't have to deal with them. And all of us good people would stay right here. The problem is that the line separating good and evil cuts right through the human heart." Alexander Solzenitzen
ellis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2005, 09:22 AM   #5
Meg
Senior Member
 
Meg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 9,846

S/C/G: 257/135/maintaining

Height: 5' 4"

Default

The funny thing is, Ellis - once you get to goal, 'pigging out' just isn't going to equal 'enjoying yourself' any more. Believe it or not!
__________________
Meg
Start: 257 - June 1, 2001
Goal: 135 - May 12, 2002
Size 22/size 4
Meg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2005, 09:31 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
ellis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Canada
Posts: 15,006

Height: 5'-2"

Default

Meg, I believe you... you're one of my heros.
__________________
I am a runner!

__________
"Wouldn't it be wonderful to take all the evil people and put them over there, then we wouldn't have to deal with them. And all of us good people would stay right here. The problem is that the line separating good and evil cuts right through the human heart." Alexander Solzenitzen
ellis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2005, 05:30 PM   #7
Jennifer
 
teapotdynamo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 718

Default

I'm not technically a maintainer yet, either, but I'm already talking myself into--and preparing my husband for--this one. I know that going back to eating like I used to is not an option, but the part I hope gets easier is the constant obsession with (or, put a less perjorative way, mindfulness about) what I put in my mouth. I suppose I'm really only into this nine months, but I still find myself THINKING and occasionally TALKING about food choices and exercise way more than I'd like (it reminds me of that old "don't think about a duck" adage). My husband has been remarkably patient through this whole journey, but I know I've been a drag to be around at times. Sometimes I even get tired of hearing myself think about it.

For now, repeating to self, "It gets easier over time... It gets easier over time..."
__________________
Preliminary Goal:



Ultimate Goal:

teapotdynamo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2005, 12:28 AM   #8
Ilene the Bean
 
Ilene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 12,169

S/C/G: 165/149/140

Height: 5'3"

Default

I accepted the food facts last year, when I really put my mind to this weightloss thing... I was listening to my g/f's say "I'll start Monday, after Christmas, my birthday", whatever excuse they had... Suddenly I realized that my mindset had changed and I had no excuses anymore, I didn't sound like them... I just put one foot in front the other, exercised daily, ate as best I could daily, and made no more excuses... I just DID IT!!
Ilene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2005, 03:03 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
boiaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 991

Default

Oops, I'm a little late on this one, I just got caught up.

I agree with most of the food facts and that maintenance does get easier over time even though I'm not that far into maintenance yet (close to a year and 1/2 now). I think that a lot of the food facts are common sense, once you've finally accepted this as a new way of living rather than a diet that will end at some point. I don't think I was really surprised when I figured out that this "diet" was going to last forever. I knew that I was making lifestyle changes and that I would never go back to my old way of life. I guess I never viewed it as so cut and dry as that. This wasn't another diet to me, this was "it". I do see how easy it would be to go back to that old life and gain the weight back though. I am certainly not immune to a relapse by any means. But I feel very confident that I won't go back, it is simply not an option I'm willing to live with anymore.

This forum has been so helpful for me because I now know what kind of ups and downs to expect in maintenance. I distinctly remember a sense of "now what" when I finally reached my goal. So those of you who've been maintaining longer, and sharing your experiences, have allowed me to be more prepared for the bumps in the road. I really think I would have been totally lost without it.

Beverly
__________________
New goal: staying binge free and losing those last few again, but for the last time!!
"Never trade what you want at the moment for what you want the most." -unknown
"Your power is in your ability to decide." -fortune cookie
"Hope; after a storm birds always sing." -unknown
boiaby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2006, 01:20 PM   #10
The Beauty of Balance
 
Jayde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: W of the Atlantic
Posts: 1,047

S/C/G: 213/193~196/<195

Height: 5'7"

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meg
Three years of living maintenance every day has given me the confidence of knowing that the only way that I’ll gain the weight back is if I make a lot of really bad choices. I now know – beyond the shadow of a doubt - that the power to keep the weight off is totally in my hands. Regain isn’t going to happen to me passively; I would actively and consciously have to make bad decisions – ranging from not monitoring my weight to not exercising to eating the wrong foods – in order to put the weight back on. So knowing that keeping the weight off is completely under my control and in my hands makes maintenance a lot easier in my mind. I KNOW what to do to keep the weight off and I fully intend to keep doing it every day of my life. This new body (and new life) is a gift beyond compare and I’ll never ever choose to give it up.
WOW! I'm printing this out!

The quote from Dr. Kirschenbaum from this chapter sticks in my mind:

"Self-monitoring is the single most important aspect of effective weight control."

After reading Meg's post I suddenly realized that this regain was not passive. I know I did it to myself, but until now did not realize that I actively chose to regain by passive behavior. I chose it.... And just as I've chosen it.. I can chose a different reality for myself.. but also have to recall from chapter two, "Knowing never equals doing."

Thanks Meg, for all the thought you put into your posts!
__________________
August DAILY goals Total points 3.5/24
30 min yoga or pilates or ball
30 min of rigorous cardio interval training
30 min of flex time: cardio or weight training or intensive functional exercise

I didn't lose weight. I burned up stored calories.
Jayde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2007, 09:32 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Ontario's West Coast
Posts: 14,249

S/C/G: 165/147/128

Height: 5'3"

Default

On making the transition from weight loss to maintenance .... people who lost pounds quickly through a structured weight loss plan/or strict diet ... Kevin C, 45 lbs in 5 months admits "Maintenance is a nightmare." .... how you lose weight may alter your perception of how difficult maintenance is.The author is impressed by the similarities in the way some masters ate then and how they eat during maintenance.


... all groups maintained their weight loss by consuming low-fat, low-calorie diets and exercising


I think I had the notion that an occassional treat was a couple of times a week. The masters speak of careful portions one or two times a month or a few times a year!

On more intutitive eating ... I sat at 500 cals last evening when I got home from work. I was not weak, my tummy was not grumbly ... I just don't get that part. But the idea of constant vigilance doesn't bother me much.
__________________
... Susan
Eat good food. Move yourself. Lift something.

You'll be surprised how much you don't miss grain.

Last edited by srmb60 : 06-08-2007 at 09:34 AM. Reason: clumsy fingers
srmb60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Posts by members, moderators and admins are not considered medical advice
and no guarantee is made against accuracy.


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
TFL Key #5: Nip It In The Bud: Break The Relapse Cycle Meg The Maintenance Library 39 06-02-2012 11:53 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:28 AM.






Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2