Exercise! - Runners (shin splints?)




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novangel
01-26-2013, 12:41 PM
I'm a noob to jogging but I started back in the fall and without fail I get achy shins which recover after about a day or two, but I also experience (which is the worst!) bad sore spots on the inside of my lower legs, near the bone about 4 inches above the ankle. If I press on it, it feels like a nasty bruise but there's no visible bruise. Shin splints? They normally calm down within a day or two but I would like to be able to run more than one day in a row. What can I do, or what am I doing wrong? I aim to run about 20 miles a week...or at least try to but my legs get too pissy. I have better luck with the treadmill, when I run outside on concrete my legs are over with. I don't know if it matters but I'm 38.

Ice after? Insoles for better shock absorbency? Wrap my legs with tape like a horse? :lol: I want to be a more consistent runner.

I'm posting a pic of the actual shoes I wear which are Skechers (they're only a few months old, indoor use only) but are for running. Please don't tell me I'll have to spend $200 on a new pair of Nike's. :o

All input in this department much appreciated. :)


TripSwitch
01-26-2013, 01:21 PM
It could just be a simple over use issue in which case it will just take time to build up to the level that you want to run at... but it could also be a shoe issue or biomechanical, or even a combination of these...

Have you ever had your running gait looked at... Do you overpronate? Underpronate? I'm not going to tell you run out and buy $200 Nike's... But the suggestion I would have is to look into a well cushioned running specific shoe that takes into account your biomechanics and running gait... the right running shoe really can make a big difference, but in the mean time running on softer surfaces and not running on consecutive days would probably be wise at this point...

novangel
01-26-2013, 01:46 PM
Have you ever had your running gait looked at... Do you overpronate? Underpronate?

Good question. I have actually wondered many times if I was running "wrong" and it feels as though I might be. I find myself trying to adjust my gait while jogging because I feel as though I'm not extending my legs enough (possibly as I get tired) so my steps feel shorter which probably creates more impact...if that makes sense. Is there a Youtube video about this, or how do I find out if I have a proper gait?

I can't believe I'm wanting an instruction guide on how to run. :^:


NolaMama
01-26-2013, 03:10 PM
To OP, I second what TripSwitch suggests.

You need to go to a shoe store the specializes in running. They have well trained people there that will ask you to take off your shoes and they will watch you walk. If you do pronate inward or outward, they make shoes specific for your needs. There really is no "correcting" how you run or walk. In fact, I would think that trying to correct something that comes natural to you is only going to make your legs feel worse during a run. Before you go out and spend a ton of money on just any shoes you need to determine what shoe is right for you. Google a runner's specialty store in your area.

slimmingsi
01-26-2013, 03:55 PM
General rules if you train regularly 3x a week or more. you should change your shoes maximum every 6 months. if you weight in at 200+ its more like every 3-4.

Seconly get a good sports massage. this will highlight knotted muscles and tightness which is probably affecting your running. a good sports therapist will also be able to give you good advice on if you have shin splints. there are usually 2 types. 1 type is actual splintering of the bone the = a very long rest up period like months. 2 the muslce on the shin starts to tear away from the bone causing pain and swelling.

How do you run? are you a heel striker? i.e does your heel strike the ground first? if it does this is very bad news.

seriously get a decent sports therapist in to check you out work on those legs they will usually identify some muscular weakness somewhere and give you exercises to strengthen them. You may find that its nothing to do with gait or shoes but merely tightness of muscles causing tension.

novangel
01-26-2013, 04:05 PM
General rules if you train regularly 3x a week or more. you should change your shoes maximum every 6 months. if you weight in at 200+ its more like every 3-4.

Seconly get a good sports massage. this will highlight knotted muscles and tightness which is probably affecting your running. a good sports therapist will also be able to give you good advice on if you have shin splints. there are usually 2 types. 1 type is actual splintering of the bone the = a very long rest up period like months. 2 the muscle on the shin starts to tear away from the bone causing pain and swelling. D:

How do you run? are you a heel striker? i.e does your heel strike the ground first? if it does this is very bad news.

seriously get a decent sports therapist in to check you out work on those legs they will usually identify some muscular weakness somewhere and give you exercises to strengthen them. You may find that its nothing to do with gait or shoes but merely tightness of muscles causing tension.

All good advice that I will follow. Thank you. :)

I will have to pay attention to if I am a heel striker or not but I don't think so. I also have no problem getting a good sports massage. :lol:

ParkTrot
01-26-2013, 04:06 PM
As other have said, I highly recommend getting fitted for a running shoe. I spent a fsir amount under $200 after getting fitted, and even then the only reason I paid so much was I needed some of the more expensive inserts, which did not surprise me because my arches are scary high. I was CONSTANTLY getting shin splints and ankle pain from my old (expensive) running shoes, and I have not had any issues since getting fitted. I went to my local Fleet Feet store and was very happy with the results. I know each location probably varies, but they get two thumbs up from me!

Additionally I find if my shins or ankles do get just a smidgen sore, taping always helps. I am a frequent taper due primarily to my CrossFit activities, but it can help with running as well. For a very user friendly tape I always recommend RockTape or KT Tape Pro. In my experience rock tape holds up better, but the KT Pro is usually easier to get access to.

novangel
01-26-2013, 04:10 PM
As other have said, I highly recommend getting fitted for a running shoe. I spent a fsir amount under $200 after getting fitted, and even then the only reason I paid so much was I needed some of the more expensive inserts, which did not surprise me because my arches are scary high. I was CONSTANTLY getting shin splints and ankle pain from my old (expensive) running shoes, and I have not had any issues since getting fitted. I went to my local Fleet Feet store and was very happy with the results. I know each location probably varies, but they get two thumbs up from me!

Additionally I find if my shins or ankles do get just a smidgen sore, taping always helps. I am a frequent taper due primarily to my CrossFit activities, but it can help with running as well. For a very user friendly tape I always recommend RockTape or KT Tape Pro. I'm my experience rock tape holds up better, but the KT Pro is usually easier to get access to.

I plan to get insoles for extra shock absorbency and I will also look into the tape. Next time I will get fitted for sure.

Lindsayanne716
01-26-2013, 05:41 PM
My first thought is maybe you are wearing the wrong type of shoes for the type of running you are doing. I know there is a big difference between trail shoes and regular running shoes. I would suggest going to a real running store and investing in a really good pair of shoes so you don't end up causing long term damage to your joints, etc.

Someone once brought to my attention a way of running which is called "chi running" and it totally sounds ridiculous but makes sense. It teaches you to run in a way that is more like a "controlled fall". I don't know, like I said it sounds silly but look it up on YouTube... It supposedly lessens the impact on your joints :)

augeremt
02-01-2013, 08:51 PM
I have better luck with the treadmill, when I run outside on concrete my legs are over with.

Concrete is the worst surface you can run on, seriously. I had the same problems as you and my shin splints all but disappeared with a new pair of fitted shoes and running on a different surface.

Follow everyone else's advice about going to a running store. Get the free video analysis to see if you overpronate, underpronate, or anything like that and get a recommendation for the right kind of shoe for your gait. Then you can always buy that shoe online for cheaper.

Also, when running outside, try asphalt (that is, the road or a bike path) or any dirt trails or, better yet, grass. It's amazing what a difference even asphalt makes when compared to concrete.

Good luck!