Weight Loss Support - Anyone lose weight without incorporating exercise?




Pudgebrownie
08-11-2012, 11:30 AM
A not-so-close friend of mine on FB was about 30lbs plus overweight, and managed to shred all of it in a decent amount of time, just by eating better. She's in her 30's and doesn't have saggy skin. She looks fantastic. Guess I'm just curious as to how common this kind of result is. Any of you mostly just focusing on eating habits with minimal to no exercise? How is that working for you?


QuilterInVA
08-11-2012, 11:44 AM
Losing weight without exercise means you are losing muscle along with fat. You will not have that toned look and muscle definition. You can't have a healthy lifestyle without incorporating at least 30 minutes of exercise every day. Losing 30 pounds usually does not result in lose skin.

CandieRae
08-11-2012, 11:49 AM
I could see that working, but for me, it would take a whole lot longer of time to lose and I am the type of girl that needs to see results asap for reassurance that what I'm doing is actually working. For me, I LIKE the exercise part. I feel accomplished and very proud of myself after a workout. The exercise part is the easy part for me, now training myself to eat right is the real struggle.


kaplods
08-11-2012, 11:54 AM
I've lost weight without exercise before, and I'ven known a lot of people of all starting weights who have also, but exercise does a lot more than help you lose weight.

In the book Refuse to regain, and the other (two) books I've read (title's escape me now) that interviewed successful maintainers reported that nearly every person who maintained their weight loss for more than five years, all had incorporated exercise into their maintenance (if not their weight loss).

For myself, "this time" I can't tell you whether the weight loss or the increasing activity level has been the most important in improving my mood, health, strength and endurance. I'd guess pretty much both equally (and stress-management and good sleep have been just as important).

There's some research support suggesting that active overweight folks are healthier and live longer than sedentary thin folks, so exercise may be as or more important than weight for health.

That doesn't mean you have to start spending hours in the gym to look and feel good, but it may mean that exercise isn't optional for good health.

You don't even have to "exercise" (as in work out). "This time" I've only started to recently (in the last year) go to the gym to exercise on equipment like the treadmill or the elliptical. Instead I looked for fun ways to move more. The only real "exercise" I could do was swim. And getting to the water was harder work than swimming itself (because once in the water, I was free from gravity).

That's not going to be your issue at your starting weight, but you still can decide to "move more" without adding in exercise routines. You may though find that you actually enjoy moving more, whether that means taking extra shopping trips on the weekend, riding a bike for fun, or going out dancing more often...

Exercise isn't necessary for weight loss, but it may be necessary for truly good health. You don't have to incorporate it right away, but don't put it off indefinitely, because in the long-run it may be even more important than the weight loss.

dogdaysofdiets
08-11-2012, 12:16 PM
I've lost most of my weight by not increasing my fitness level very much. I was always very active and have maintained a consistent cardio/lifting routine for several years. But despite the working out, I was 100lbs overweight because I didn't work on my nutrition. My favorite saying is...'you can't outrun a pizza'.

I focused on my nutrition, only increasing my workouts as I got closer to goal, but I attribute the majority of my success to changing my nutrition intake. I have loose skin because I lost nearly 100lbs, not because I wasn't maintaining or increasing my muscle mass. I did not start seeing the loose skin until 50+ pounds lost.

ion
08-11-2012, 12:24 PM
as everyone so far has said, exercise is essential to a healthy and fit lifestyle. but weight loss can happen due to only eating better--and that's because, ultimately, the science behind weight loss is due to calories. if you eat more calories than you expend, you WILL gain weight. if you spend more calories than you eat, you WILL lose weight. unless there is another factor preventing normal metabolism from taking place, this is how it goes.

but, like QuilterInVA said, if you are not incorporating a decent amount of exercise as well, this mass that you lose will be fat AND muscle.

Elladorine
08-11-2012, 12:34 PM
I had to take some time off from my exercise routine for a couple of months, which simply consisted of walking and lifting dumbbells. I'm trying to get back into it again now that the doctor has cleared me, but I haven't noticed any difference with the rate of my loss. I've remained relatively active regardless, just less structured.

Vex
08-11-2012, 01:22 PM
I've lost the weight I have with practically no exercise, a fact I'm not necessarily proud of. I do notice some loose skin. Could exercise help me with that? Probably some, but if you have a LOT of loose skin really the only thing that can help would be time and possibly surgery.

Exercise is necessary for fitness- aerobic for cardiovascular and lifting for muscle. Dieting is for losing weight.

You're right in saying that dieting loses both muscle and fat. Lifting weights while dieting can help you maintain some of the muscle you're losing and cardio can burn some extra calories, but exercise in general is not necessary to lose weight for most people.

valalltogether
08-11-2012, 01:57 PM
i feel like i've lost all my weight simply by counting calories. the loss of muscle scares me, so i do plan on beginning to lift one of these days...however..i consider myself to be pretty active as i have a demanding job. i'm sort of "lifting" everyday already anyway...sixtel kegs, beer cases, boxes of soda syrup, etc...

ilidawn
08-11-2012, 02:26 PM
I've started losing weight gradually from changing my diet (I used to eat horrendously now I truly look at it with new eyes!). I haven't upped my exercise yet but working on flexing more (trying to get strength back in places that got weak when I was injured last year). I suppose it's possible to lose that much though I question how healthy that can be

juniebug
08-11-2012, 02:38 PM
For now I'm only focusing on changing my eating habits. I'm one of those people that does better if I take on one thing at a time as opposed to trying to change many things about myself and my life at once. Once I feel I have my diet under control, then I'll add fitness into my daily routine because it is important. My ultimate goal isn't to be skinny, but healthy.

Only Me
08-11-2012, 02:52 PM
I have trouble losing weight when I'm exercising intensely. It makes me extra hungry. ;) Instead, I focused on adding lots of activity to my day, without it seeming much like exercise. Just walking my 8yo to school and back (morning, noon, and afternoon) every single time rather than jumping in the car, would have me walking 9km over the course of the day. Add in an errand to pick up milk or bread and I'd walk over 10km in a day without ever thinking about it as exercise. No sweating, no getting out of breath involved.

Obviously it did burn calories though, and improved my fitness level. Now that I'm close to goal, I want to get back into running again. A few weeks ago, I was able to just head out and slowly jog 5km without walking breaks. I hope I'm at a point where I can fight the extra hunger than intense exercise causes me, but if I'm not I know I can just cut back to walking a lot and stay fit and lose weight.

Pudgebrownie
08-11-2012, 03:15 PM
I, personally, don't think there's one way to do something for everyone. We're all different, our bodies are all different, and our results will be different. I can understand taking a day at a time, and in a step by step process. I think too often we set ourselves up with placing too much on our plate - so to speak. But moderation is key. I don't believe you have to hit the gym, or do X number of push-ups or X amount of time on a treadmill, to incorporate exercise. Certainly, as some of you have already mentioned, walking from point A to point B instead of driving, is a good way to get exercise. I also agree, that having children, especially young ones, really keeps you "on the go". I have a 10 month old and she literally keeps me on my feet and chasing after her!

Expunge
08-11-2012, 03:44 PM
Exercise is actually terrible for weight loss. The amount of effort it takes to burn even minimal calories is so disproportionate to how easy it is to just eat less. This video is an excellent example of why:

http://youtu.be/UQbuzsY_34Q

It's totally possible to lose any weight you want to lose without ever taking a single step, much less intentionally exercising.

That said, what exercise is good for is sculpting your body and building muscle. When you lose weight, you're not just losing fat - you're also losing water and lean muscle mass. Exercising properly while losing can help to prevent losing quite as much muscle mass - this means that the scale often goes down much more slowly, since you're not losing the water/lean mass that contributes to the total, but the end result is much better. The more lean mass you have, the higher your resting metabolic rate, and the more calories you will be able to eat while maintaining weight - which makes keeping the weight off easier, since you've got more room to work with. And there's a huge aesthetic difference between someone who's 140lbs and 35% body fat and someone the same weight and height who's 15-20% body fat.

This is a great link that really illustrates how muscle mass impacts how your body looks:

http://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/2011/07/21/meet-staci-your-new-powerlifting-super-hero/

Now, even if you don't want to lift heavy and get super cut like the person above, you can still see the difference. It takes an enormous amount of work to get to her level, it won't happen accidentally.

And it's also critical for good health, as has been shown time after time in study after study. The more activity, the better - not just exercise, but movement throughout the day in general. Obese people who start exercising moderately can experience dramatic improvements in health markers even if they don't lose a single pound. Exercise is really really good for you. But it doesn't have to be in a gym, it doesn't even have to be structured - it can be any activity you really enjoy doing. It's better to do something less "effective" than to do nothing at all!

Pudgebrownie
08-11-2012, 04:03 PM
Good post, Expunge!

going2bskinny
08-11-2012, 04:30 PM
losing weight is 80 percent diet 20 percent exercise that's what they say so yeah you can lose weight just focusing on your eating habits if you aren't that overweight your not going to have loose skin anyways.

Plus if you exercise you increase your appetite so it takes longer and is harder to lose weight in my opinion. I think it's best to really concentrate on your eating and just do light workouts like take a walk lift some light weights just do fun things like swimming get outside more have fun but don't overdo the exercise whenever I do I end up starving and then giving into eating bad and undo all the weight I lost when I was just taking it easy and eating good. I'd say lose the weight first then after if you want really defined muscles get more hard into the weight lifting and things.

Yeah you may loose a little muscle while you diet but ... you can gain muscle back so no biggie

with that said its good to do some light workouts and build a little muscle though because the more muscle you have the more calories you burn at rest so I try to do light weights at least or just floor exercises like sit ups pushups but dont go too hard take it easy.

sontaikle
08-11-2012, 04:43 PM
Plus if you exercise you increase your appetite so it takes longer and is harder to lose weight in my opinion. I think it's best to really concentrate on your eating and just do light workouts like take a walk lift some light weights just do fun things like swimming get outside more have fun but don't overdo the exercise whenever I do I end up starving and then giving into eating bad and undo all the weight I lost when I was just taking it easy and eating good. I'd say lose the weight first then after if you want really defined muscles get more hard into the weight lifting and things.

Yeah you may loose a little muscle while you diet but ... you can gain muscle back so no biggie


I'm sorry but this is horrible advice. You should lift while losing because you've already built the muscle; lifting will make sure you'll keep it.

Gaining muscle is difficult, especially for women.

Keep muscle, diet off the fat—isn't that what most of us want anyway?

kaplods
08-11-2012, 05:11 PM
Yeah you may loose a little muscle while you diet but ... you can gain muscle back so no biggie.

Well, it can be quite a biggie, if the muscle you lose is heart muscle.

One of the ways in which vlcd's (very low-calorie diets) can be dangerous is through heart damage. And you don't get to choose which muscle you lose, so getting adequate protein and preventing muscle loss through at least moderate activity is extremely important.

Yes, exercise can slow weight loss, but sacrificing exercise to lose weight faster is like shaving your head and cutting off your ears so you can swim faster... it might work, but it causes more damage than it solves.

For some bizarre reason, we as a culture have decided that speed and quantity of weight loss is more important than health (and often even more important than beauty, because it's the number we're looking at, not even how we look in the mirror).

You can sacrifice exercise, but it will be at the expense of your health. You don't have to run a marathon every day, but if you're going to choose one health improvement, especially if you're not morbidly obese, you might fare better sacrificing weight loss and spending the time on exercise, because there's more and more research coming out that suggests that eating fruits and vegetables and exercising regularly may actually be more important than the exact number on the scale.

If you're just trying to fit into a certain dress size, diet-only may work for you, but if you want to look AND feel good, then exercise, rest/sleep, stress-management, and the nutrients in your food (not just the calorie count) are all important. You don't have to take on all the changes at once, but if you focus on only one thing, there's a very good chance to be causing as many problems as you're fixing.

In my experience, I lost weight faster when drastically cut calories and didn't incorporate exercise, but I also burned out faster. I would end up feeling so exhausted and fatigued that I couldn't sustain further weight loss or even attempt maintenance (and when you're exhausted, the last thing you feel like doing is adding exercise).

"This time," I've not been worried about the pace so much as incorporating healthy changes that were in my best interest in the long run. I'm not losing as fast, but I'm feeling healthier and happier than I ever have in my life.

In the past I often sacrificed health for speed and would think "I can worry about being healthy AFTER I get thin." The problem is that with speed-focused weight loss, I never made it to "thin," because of the health-impacts. I'd feel rotten and have zero energy (and often didn't even realize I was feeling rotten, because it came on so gradually).

Exercise and muscle-building hinders in the short-term, but helps in the long term. Sometimes the "short cut" ends up being the longer, harder journey in the long-run.

In pioneer days, many people died taking "the short cut" over, rather than around lakes and mountains, because the distance was shorter and (if everything went perfectly) took less time, but when it didn't go perfectly, the short-cut delayed or killed them.

I've never incorporated exercise in previous attempts the way I am doing it now (I often was more active and exercised harder than I am now, but I wasn't as diligent about including exercise and working at increasing strength and endurance). I always looked at exercise in terms of calories burned, not in terms of overall health, the effrects of exercise on strength, endurance, immunity-building, stress-management, restful sleep...

You can look at the big picture, or you can focus only on speed. If you don't have much weight to lose, it might even be safe to focus only on speed (so long as you start focusing on health sooner rather than later), but in the long-run speed means very little.

If I hadn't thought speed was the most important factor, maybe I could have gotten all my weight off in middle school instead of doing so in middle-age. I've never lost nearly this much weight before, and have never kept it off so long, and I think focusing on overall health instead of just the speed and the number, has made all the difference.

pixelllate
08-11-2012, 05:37 PM
I lost my first 40 lbs without doing anything but walking not even RUNNING!
haha
I worked my diet first. I figured if anything goes wrong (like somehow I have no time to workout or something) I can always watch my diet, so I worked on incorporating healthy habits. I'm far from perfect but much better eating wise than where I was before!

SerenityDiva
08-11-2012, 05:41 PM
My mom always loses weight without exercising. She's lost the same 40-70 pounds since her 30s. She has horrible muscle mass and even when she has weighed 20 pounds less than me, she's 1 inch taller, she's 2-4 sizes bigger. So yeah she's 120 pounds but a size 14-16 of fluff.

I don't think being healthy or thin should be based on the scale alone. I also do not like the "oh I have muscle" and really refuse to use a scale. Fat calipers, measuring tapes, and scales IMO should ALL be used to assess. And I dunno I gain muscle really easy for a chick, but it's not SO easy to regain muscle in my experience that it's worth deconditioning.

Mer du Japon
08-11-2012, 06:55 PM
It is certainly possible. I lost 18 lbs in 4 weeks by eating right and walking everywhere. Once my weight loss slows, I will probably start hitting the gym. Exercise is so healthy and beneficial.

kaplods
08-11-2012, 08:12 PM
It is certainly possible. I lost 18 lbs in 4 weeks by eating right and walking everywhere. Once my weight loss slows, I will probably start hitting the gym. Exercise is so healthy and beneficial.

"walking everywhere" IS EXERCISE. The perception that exercise is something that can only be done at the gym, using some kind of special equipment, and must entail heavy lifting and/or heavy sweating, just isn't true.

"Moving more," even if it's barely just a little more, IS EXERCISE. If you only count heavy-sweating, I've lost all 105 lbs without exercise. My first "exercise" was moving my arms and legs in bed, and getting up to take my plate to the kitchen rather than asking my husband to do it (because I was virtually an invalid when I started).

Once I was able to move around more, I started wearing a pedometer, and tried to beat the previous day's step-count (even if only by a few steps).

I think the idea that exercise has to be 45 minutes of heavy sweating, at least four times a week (or whatever other criteria we believe makes some activity "count" as exercise) has kept a lot of people from doing any unnecessary movement at all, because it doesn't "count" unless it's x, y, or z.

It ALL counts. Doing more, even just a little more (unless you're extremely active already) is exercise and it counts.

gailr42
08-11-2012, 09:55 PM
I remember back when almost nothing counted on the charts they published for calories burned. You never got credit for heavy sweating while doing housework. LOL! I got a resentment. I think those old charts were discouraging.

going2bskinny
08-11-2012, 11:48 PM
Well, it can be quite a biggie, if the muscle you lose is heart muscle.

One of the ways in which vlcd's (very low-calorie diets) can be dangerous is through heart damage. And you don't get to choose which muscle you lose, so getting adequate protein and preventing muscle loss through at least moderate activity is extremely important.

Yes, exercise can slow weight loss, but sacrificing exercise to lose weight faster is like shaving your head and cutting off your ears so you can swim faster... it might work, but it causes more damage than it solves.

For some bizarre reason, we as a culture have decided that speed and quantity of weight loss is more important than health (and often even more important than beauty, because it's the number we're looking at, not even how we look in the mirror).

You can sacrifice exercise, but it will be at the expense of your health. You don't have to run a marathon every day, but if you're going to choose one health improvement, especially if you're not morbidly obese, you might fare better sacrificing weight loss and spending the time on exercise, because there's more and more research coming out that suggests that eating fruits and vegetables and exercising regularly may actually be more important than the exact number on the scale.

If you're just trying to fit into a certain dress size, diet-only may work for you, but if you want to look AND feel good, then exercise, rest/sleep, stress-management, and the nutrients in your food (not just the calorie count) are all important. You don't have to take on all the changes at once, but if you focus on only one thing, there's a very good chance to be causing as many problems as you're fixing.

In my experience, I lost weight faster when drastically cut calories and didn't incorporate exercise, but I also burned out faster. I would end up feeling so exhausted and fatigued that I couldn't sustain further weight loss or even attempt maintenance (and when you're exhausted, the last thing you feel like doing is adding exercise).

"This time," I've not been worried about the pace so much as incorporating healthy changes that were in my best interest in the long run. I'm not losing as fast, but I'm feeling healthier and happier than I ever have in my life.

In the past I often sacrificed health for speed and would think "I can worry about being healthy AFTER I get thin." The problem is that with speed-focused weight loss, I never made it to "thin," because of the health-impacts. I'd feel rotten and have zero energy (and often didn't even realize I was feeling rotten, because it came on so gradually).

Exercise and muscle-building hinders in the short-term, but helps in the long term. Sometimes the "short cut" ends up being the longer, harder journey in the long-run.

In pioneer days, many people died taking "the short cut" over, rather than around lakes and mountains, because the distance was shorter and (if everything went perfectly) took less time, but when it didn't go perfectly, the short-cut delayed or killed them.

I've never incorporated exercise in previous attempts the way I am doing it now (I often was more active and exercised harder than I am now, but I wasn't as diligent about including exercise and working at increasing strength and endurance). I always looked at exercise in terms of calories burned, not in terms of overall health, the effrects of exercise on strength, endurance, immunity-building, stress-management, restful sleep...

You can look at the big picture, or you can focus only on speed. If you don't have much weight to lose, it might even be safe to focus only on speed (so long as you start focusing on health sooner rather than later), but in the long-run speed means very little.

If I hadn't thought speed was the most important factor, maybe I could have gotten all my weight off in middle school instead of doing so in middle-age. I've never lost nearly this much weight before, and have never kept it off so long, and I think focusing on overall health instead of just the speed and the number, has made all the difference.

oh aaaaaah didnt know u could lose heart muscle thats scary thanks for the info. i still do moderate exercise i just dont go really hard and really long cuz when i do i tend to get really hungry but yeah nvm then lol thanks guys

Chubbygirl253
08-12-2012, 12:51 AM
I started my diet 6/17. I was exercising very little to none in the beginning and increased it gradually. But even when I was sticking to plan religiously I was losing tiny amounts at a time. My metabolism was moving like molasses. But then I joined the Y the end of July. And I have increased my workouts to about 3 hrs a day/ 6 days a wk. And I've lost more since then than I did in double that time without exercise. As for being hungrier from exercise, I have found the opposite. It makes me less hungry. And I'm much less likely to make poor choices after putting in all that sweat time. Everyone has to do what they think is right for them. When and if this quits working for me, I'll reeveluate then. Until that time I am enjoying myself, feel better than I ever have, and am losing at a much quicker pace.

Shawnny Canuck
08-12-2012, 02:15 AM
I lost 50lbs in just over 3 months without exercising. I was on Ideal Protein and although it was a good way to jump start my weight loss I decided to drop the program and start exercising. I have to admit I feel a lot better now that I have started working out.

Mer du Japon
08-12-2012, 08:05 AM
"walking everywhere" IS EXERCISE. The perception that exercise is something that can only be done at the gym, using some kind of special equipment, and must entail heavy lifting and/or heavy sweating, just isn't true.

"Moving more," even if it's barely just a little more, IS EXERCISE. If you only count heavy-sweating, I've lost all 105 lbs without exercise. My first "exercise" was moving my arms and legs in bed, and getting up to take my plate to the kitchen rather than asking my husband to do it (because I was virtually an invalid when I started).

Once I was able to move around more, I started wearing a pedometer, and tried to beat the previous day's step-count (even if only by a few steps).

I think the idea that exercise has to be 45 minutes of heavy sweating, at least four times a week (or whatever other criteria we believe makes some activity "count" as exercise) has kept a lot of people from doing any unnecessary movement at all, because it doesn't "count" unless it's x, y, or z.

It ALL counts. Doing more, even just a little more (unless you're extremely active already) is exercise and it counts.

Okay. I suppose I should clarify. For ME it is not what I consider exercise. I have walked 20 minutes each way to work daily for years, long before trying to loose weight. For ME I consider exercise to be hitting the gym. For ME I consider breaking a sweat as exercise.

Prim2012
08-12-2012, 08:43 AM
Thanks for the links Expunge. I especially love the second one which shows how much thinner you can look after lifting heavy weights even when you're 10-15 pounds heavier. I've been lifting heavy weights so the scale hasn't budged much but I like the progress I'm "seeing" in my body.

luckystreak
08-12-2012, 11:00 AM
Exercise is the most important things to do and to make habit of. Of course so is eating right, but you can't improve your cardiovascular fitness just by eating right.

Dont ever give it up.. weight loss is nice and all but health comes first.

novangel
08-12-2012, 11:10 AM
"Exercise is actually terrible for weight loss" :?: My avatar shows otherwise. That's terrible advice. If you don't want to exercise that's fine but don't make up false information to validate not wanting to work out.

It's one thing to lose 30-100p without exercise but losing the last 7-10p is extremely difficult. I guess it all depends on the person's goal weight and how healthy/fit you want to be in the end. Diet without exercise will never get me to where I want to go.

Bella130
08-12-2012, 11:13 AM
I'm sure there was muscle loss there too...I always thought exercise was vital in losing weight and keeping it off (along with healthy eating)...

kaplods
08-12-2012, 11:59 AM
Okay. I suppose I should clarify. For ME it is not what I consider exercise. I have walked 20 minutes each way to work daily for years, long before trying to lose weight. For ME I consider exercise to be hitting the gym. For ME I consider breaking a sweat as exercise.


It's important that we all have a better, and more common definition of exercise, otherwise with everyone having their own definition of exercise, the answers are almost meaningless.

It's as if someone asked "Do cats make good pets?" If we're all talking and thinking about house kitties, the answers are probably going to include a whole lot more yesses, than if some of us are thinking of lions, tigers, leopards and cougars.

We all have a right TO personal definitions, but it makes communication extremely difficult.

Before we can have a productive discussion on the value exercise we ALL have to agree on what exercise IS.

gailr42
08-12-2012, 12:53 PM
Maybe if I can get my slinky black cat to lift, he could become a panther.

Kaplods, you make a very good point about agreeing on the definition of exercise. It looks like it might be different for different people.

For me, I had to start somewhere. I have been completely sedentary for several years, and I am an older woman, so I set as my goal to walk a mile three times a week. Somewhere I read that this is an acceptable amount of exercise for "health". It took me a while to be able to do this, but now I can.

So exercise for me, because you can't deny that my walking is exercise, is different from exercise for Mer du Japon. I am starting with less exercise than she has been doing forever. We have different fitness levels.

I think maybe the crux is that each of us needs to be doing some activity that challenges us. Some of us are up to bigger challenges than others. My longer term goal is to get up to walking two miles three or more times a week. I think that will be pretty good for me, but still below what Mer is already doing.

sontaikle
08-12-2012, 01:07 PM
Any movement really is exercise. Taking the stairs is exercise, walking from the far end of the parking lot is exercise, walking around the mall is exercise, chasing your kids is exercise.

The difference is what it does for each of us. If you're just looking to not be out of breath playing with your kids, then the above is enough. If you're looking to run a 5k then obviously it is not.

Our fitness levels are all different. Don't dismiss someone's exercise because it doesn't seem like exercise to you.

For example: the wii fit is much too easy for me. To me it is not a workout, but I'm not about to scoff at someone using it to get a little activity into their life!

krampus
08-13-2012, 11:24 AM
Yeah, but I'd rather do both at the same time. It's more rewarding to be able to lift stuff and run around and not get out of breath taking the stairs.

going2bskinny
08-13-2012, 02:51 PM
"Exercise is actually terrible for weight loss" :?: My avatar shows otherwise. That's terrible advice. If you don't want to exercise that's fine but don't make up false information to validate not wanting to work out.

It's one thing to lose 30-100p without exercise but losing the last 7-10p is extremely difficult. I guess it all depends on the person's goal weight and how healthy/fit you want to be in the end. Diet without exercise will never get me to where I want to go.

where are you getting that quote from? just wondering...

I think you guys are kinda blowing what I said a tad bit out of proportion but oh well

"I think it's best to really concentrate on your eating and just do light workouts like take a walk lift some light weights just do fun things like swimming get outside more have fun but don't overdo the exercise whenever I do I end up starving and then giving into eating bad and undo all the weight I lost when I was just taking it easy and eating good."

that is actually what I said

JohnP
08-13-2012, 05:56 PM
where are you getting that quote from? just wondering...

Exercise is actually terrible for weight loss.

When taken out of context this quote makes the poster look silly but Expunge actually made a really good post but they probably stopped reading after the first sentance...

going2bskinny
08-14-2012, 04:12 AM
When taken out of context this quote makes the poster look silly but Expunge actually made a really good post but they probably stopped reading after the first sentance...

Oh ok thanks John ... Yeah it really is true diet has much more to do with it than exercise that's what I was doing wrong for so many years wish someone had told me that sooner.

going2bskinny
08-14-2012, 04:58 AM
Exercise is actually terrible for weight loss. The amount of effort it takes to burn even minimal calories is so disproportionate to how easy it is to just eat less. This video is an excellent example of why:

http://youtu.be/UQbuzsY_34Q

It's totally possible to lose any weight you want to lose without ever taking a single step, much less intentionally exercising.

That said, what exercise is good for is sculpting your body and building muscle. When you lose weight, you're not just losing fat - you're also losing water and lean muscle mass. Exercising properly while losing can help to prevent losing quite as much muscle mass - this means that the scale often goes down much more slowly, since you're not losing the water/lean mass that contributes to the total, but the end result is much better. The more lean mass you have, the higher your resting metabolic rate, and the more calories you will be able to eat while maintaining weight - which makes keeping the weight off easier, since you've got more room to work with. And there's a huge aesthetic difference between someone who's 140lbs and 35% body fat and someone the same weight and height who's 15-20% body fat.

This is a great link that really illustrates how muscle mass impacts how your body looks:

http://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/2011/07/21/meet-staci-your-new-powerlifting-super-hero/

Now, even if you don't want to lift heavy and get super cut like the person above, you can still see the difference. It takes an enormous amount of work to get to her level, it won't happen accidentally.

And it's also critical for good health, as has been shown time after time in study after study. The more activity, the better - not just exercise, but movement throughout the day in general. Obese people who start exercising moderately can experience dramatic improvements in health markers even if they don't lose a single pound. Exercise is really really good for you. But it doesn't have to be in a gym, it doesn't even have to be structured - it can be any activity you really enjoy doing. It's better to do something less "effective" than to do nothing at all!

Wow thanks for that link its the best info I have seen and in gonna give that paleo diet a try it sounds great!!

Alyj89
08-14-2012, 06:46 AM
When I started back in March I did begin exercising - I walked at the park it an hour + on weekends, and every night at home I did 30 minutes to an hour of resistance bands & mini trampoline, along with stretches sit ups etc. Did it for about a month and I lost 10lbs (coupled with 1230 calories a day). Then it got SUPER HOT here and even with AC it's just too hot and it made me absolutely miserable to be so hot so I cut it out after that - I'm down 41lbs in 5 months still by really just eating better.

With that said I will be picking up te exersize again when it's cooler. There's just no way I'm doing it when it's 110+ and I brake a sweat from just being alive. :| as soon as it hits low 80s again, which should be soon, I'll at least pick up the indoor exersizes again.

KatMarie
08-14-2012, 07:48 AM
Good links expunge...especially the second one. Really showed what lifting can do for you! That's what I'm trying to accomplish now. I was lifting light, now trying to up the weight.
I didn't exercise at first. I couldn't, I was too big, joints hurt too much. But I still lost a ton of weight without it. I felt so much better when I finally did start to walk on treadmill, then jog now running! Added in lifting. I feel so much better with exercise! I'm strong. I'm fit. I used to get out of breath just walking, now it takes a lot, like running, to get my heart rate up.