Weight Loss Support - Here's an idea for how to make sure you get enough water each day.




hazyl
05-10-2012, 11:46 AM
http://aboutthedietsolutionprogram.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/150746_365001326891486_245732105485076_999677_6736 12551_n.jpg

Resource: http://aboutthedietsolutionprogram.com/blog/


QuarterLife88
05-10-2012, 11:48 AM
Thirsty: drink
Not thirsty: I'm good.

Simple.

lyrical
05-10-2012, 11:55 AM
Thanks so much for posting this! Itís just what I needed to help with water intake, I struggle drinking enough water every day, I am just never thirsty!


twinieten
05-10-2012, 12:01 PM
That's very cool! Great idea! I should mark my bottle! On my work days, I have an easier time drinking. On my days off, I have a harder time getting it all in. It's great to have that visual reminder!

I use a Power Bottle Power Jug, which holds 80oz if filled to the neck, and make it my goal to finish it every day. I carry it with me everywhere, and people think I'm strange. I have my purse and my water bottle practically everywhere I go. :D

QuilterInVA
05-10-2012, 12:03 PM
Thirsty: drink
Not thirsty: I'm good.

Simple.

Science has shown that if you don't drink until you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated so your method won't work.

The original poster has a great idea.

guacamole
05-10-2012, 12:05 PM
This is so smart and makes it so simple! Great idea.

QuarterLife88
05-10-2012, 12:07 PM
Science has shown that if you don't drink until you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated so your method won't work.

The original poster has a great idea.

Dehydration, the kind that is severe, where I have headaches can barely function, and my urine is dark brown, is quite different from being merely thirsty.

Our body has these mechanisms (hunger, thirst, the urge to pee) for a reason. Hints to urge us to act. Without them, there is no reason to do anything. Our bodies are smarter than we give them credit for. I'm not surprised people think they have to regulate their water intake as they do their food when so many people here think a little bit of hunger needs to be avoided at all costs...

If your body needs it, it will give you a sign.

debigulating
05-10-2012, 12:14 PM
QuarterLife, that line of thinking is all well and good, but a lot of people who need to lose weight aren't great at responding to their bodies' signals. Besides, what if when my body tells me I'm thirsty, all I do is drink Coke?

I think this is a great idea! It would also prevent me from realizing at 9pm I need to get another 2 cups of water in, then having to pee all night long! :)

ChicknThief
05-10-2012, 12:21 PM
I LOVE this!!! One of the things I really really struggle with is getting enough water. I am absolutely going to implement this!

Beach Patrol
05-10-2012, 01:24 PM
Thirsty: drink
Not thirsty: I'm good.

Simple.


I agree with this.

Our bodies are very adept in knowing what it needs; but our minds/emotions/etc & taste buds often override the body's natural on/off button. We eat when we're not hungry, drink when we're not thirsty, and hey, then we get fat & wonder "what the...????"

Learning to pay attention to our natural body needs isn't easy - especially for those with addictions (alcoholics drink, binge eaters binge, etc.) If we could all just simply eat when we're hungry, stop eating when we're full, drink when we're thirsty - we'd not be an overweight society with billions of dollars wasted in weight loss industry.

However, I'm also aware that little "tricks" like the one the OP mentions is just what some people need. So hey, whatever works, I always say!! :D

freelancemomma
05-10-2012, 01:30 PM
Thirsty: drink
Not thirsty: I'm good.

Simple.


Ditto. My entire approach to weight control is based on the K.I.S.S. (keep it simple, stupid) philosophy.

F.

caramelkitty
05-10-2012, 01:34 PM
LOL I like the idea!

Although, I too drink when my body tells me to. Besides I love water and hate anything else (juice, soda...etc) so all I drink is water, but I guess for those who have a hard time, THIS TRICK IS AWESOME. :)

krampus
05-10-2012, 01:45 PM
That's pretty rigid but a good guideline for a beginner or someone who really needs to be yelled at to drink liquids.

I have a 1 liter Nalgene bottle. I probably drink 2-2.5 liters between 9-5 and drink a bunch more in the evening.

LeilaJey
05-10-2012, 02:30 PM
I always drink lots of water anyway, seem to be thirsty a lot of the time (don't have diabetes though so that's good). I can see how this would help some people big time. My boyfriend's father never drinks water but he knows he should. He drinks tea a lot if he's thirsty. Black irish tea with milk and sugar. I should give him a bottle like this!

Arctic Mama
05-10-2012, 02:35 PM
Not a bad suggestion for individuals who find themselves getting dehydrated. I do better drinking to my thirst, though. I used to stink at listening to thirt and hunger cues, but it was crucial to improve that and practice makes perfect.

Snoofie
05-10-2012, 03:02 PM
Thirsty: drink
Not thirsty: I'm good.

Simple.

Fabulous! You've found what works for you. The OP has found something that works for them, and that's just as fabulous.

Lori Bell
05-10-2012, 03:06 PM
Thirsty: drink
Not thirsty: I'm good.

Simple.

Same here. I don't have time to drink and pee all day long. I'm just too busy to have to run to the bathroom every 30 minutes, for a non-medically proven cause.

Thankfully I have found that I can drink when I'm thirsty and forget all the water chuggin' business. I was able to lose 190 pounds and keep it off for over 2.5 years and never once became "ill" because I didn't drink x amount of water per day. Praise the Lord!! :D

ennay
05-10-2012, 03:23 PM
Science has shown that if you don't drink until you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated so your method won't work.

The original poster has a great idea.

Science has also shown this to be false.

Science can show a lot of things if it wants to. And I am a scientist

freelancemomma
05-10-2012, 04:49 PM
I've been drinking in response to thirst cues forever and I've never once had any ill effects. I think there's a big difference between mild temporary dehydration and the kind of dehydration that can lead to medical problems. More severe dehydration always has symptoms.

F.

cbressler1976
05-10-2012, 04:59 PM
I carry a water bottle around with me all day and I just take sips every now and then.... I only drink water now and I don't even miss sweet drinks! This is an excellent idea....

ValRock
05-10-2012, 05:17 PM
I'm really interested in reading studies on this.

I've never been one to force water when I'm not thirsty and I've never been dehydrated or had any problems related to it. All drinking more does, is make me pee more... and I don't have time for that.

kaplods
05-10-2012, 05:54 PM
Science has shown that if you don't drink until you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated so your method won't work.

The original poster has a great idea.


This is actually a myth, and there's very little to no science behind it.

It was once a popular, but untested theory by some "experts" (not all of whom had credentials to back the legitimacy of the theory).

One such theorist is a Dr.Batmanghelidj who wrote several popular books advocating water as a cure all for practically every known ailment (and his writing is very controversial and criticised in the larger medical community).

Newer research does not support the theory.

Even the "two quart" recommendation is not backed by science. The most likely source of the myth is a nutrition article published half a century ago that estimated that people needed roughly 2 quarts of fluids - but that included the liquid in foods which accounted for half or more of that 2 quarts.

Like a game of telephone gone amok, the two quart "total" then became two quarts of liquid over and above food intake in the popular press and common wisdom.

Then the two quarts of liquid became "two quarts of liquid, not counting caffeinated beverages."

Then the two quarts of non-caffeinated beverages, became two quarts of water and only water, no other beverages or flavored waters.

Then the advice became half an ounce of pure water and only water for every pound of body weight.

None of these changes are based in science whatsoever, and until quite recently there's not been a lot of research on actual fluid needs. That's changing, but the newest research doesn't support any of these myths, rather it's finding that for most individuals, thirst IS adequate and sufficient to supply a person's hydration needs. Responding to thirst and only thirst DOES NOT result in dehydration for the average person engaged in average activity.

Drinking more than this may assist with weight loss, but it's not preventing dehydration. Thirst is generally sufficient to do that, unless you're on specific medications, have specific health problems, are in certain specific environments or are engaging in specific types or amounts of athletic activities. For 90% of us, thirst works fine as a signal to drink or not.

While it's safe (for most people) to drink two quarts or more of fluid in addition to their food, it's not necessary. And caffeinated beverages DO count (because they're not dehydrating enough to outweigh the water they do contribute).

My mother was hospitalized with water intoxication, because she believed all those myths and thought they were backed by science (after all she heard them in Weight Watchers meetings from her WW leader, so they must be based in "science"). She was only drinking about a gallon of water total per day (including that in milk and coffee).

So much of what we hear as "common wisdom" is NOT backed by science. It's just been repeated so many times that we assume it must be true, just because, "everyone says so, so it must be true."

The good news about the water myths is that there has been some pretty persuasive modern research that refutes these myths - so we actually have some true science to look to. Unfortunately the myth has been perpetuated for so long, that science may not be strong enough to communicate the truth. Unfortunately "common wisdom" even when it's been disproven tends to be stronger than science, and people will believe what they want to believe.

LockItUp
05-10-2012, 06:07 PM
It surprises me that water is such a debatable subject.

For *ME*, if I don't make sure to drink water all throughout the day I start confusing thirst for hunger, which then can lead me to overeat.

It's awesome for those of you who are able to follow your hunger and/or thirst cues and keep in balance. For those of us who have trouble with these things, something like OP posted is helpful.

Arctic Mama
05-10-2012, 06:19 PM
There's hope on that - like I said, I used to suck at this (I'd go all day in southern California summer heat without drinking water, only a can of diet Pepsi!) and had the hunger/thirst cue confusion big time, as well as symptoms of minor dehydration. But I spent a few months regularly draining large cups of water while breastfeeding and then realized I could feel 'full' on water or 'need more', and noted the differences that were previously too subtle for me to pick up on.

Now I am ad libitum on water cues and it has gotten much better, but I had to practice it for a few months to get used to it.

hazyl
05-10-2012, 10:57 PM
Water is important when you’re trying to slim down because it helps to metabolize fat and eliminate toxins and stored fat in the body. So drink up!

Only Me
05-10-2012, 11:31 PM
Thirsty: drink
Not thirsty: I'm good.

Simple.

3x in the past, I have not realized I needed to drink until I get to the point that I think I'm getting a uti. The symptoms have gone away once I started drinking again, but I got to that point without realizing I was thirsty. Twice I was on canoe trips in the summer, and I guess jumping in the water at the end of portages cooled me off and made me feel refreshed, so I barely sipped water while exercising on hot days. One time I think I went 24 hours without peeing before I realized. Another time, I was breastfeeding my 7 month old, it was summer, and my sister had just had an emergency c-section, so it was quite busy and I just didn't notice I was thirsty.

Long story short, I no long trust myself to notice that I'm thirsty and drink enough liquids. I mentally calculate to make sure I've had at least a couple of litres of liquid (coffee and tea count to me) over the course of the day.

sontaikle
05-11-2012, 05:26 AM
Wow. You people who say "just drink when you're thirsty" sound like the people who think it's simple enough to just eat when you're hungry. In theory, yes, it should work but obviously this forum wouldn't exist if everyone could just follow their body's signals.

I think the idea posted is silly, but just like any of the diet plans on this forum it's whatever works for the individual.

freelancemomma
05-11-2012, 08:59 AM
Wow. You people who say "just drink when you're thirsty" sound like the people who think it's simple enough to just eat when you're hungry. In theory, yes, it should work but obviously this forum wouldn't exist if everyone could just follow their body's signals.

Well, there's a difference. Most people on this forum (including myself) aren't in tune with their hunger/fullness cues and/or have large appetites. I haven't heard of anyone here being out of touch with thirst cues or having an uncontrollable urge to drink water. On the contrary, most people have to WORK to get in the amount of water they think they need.

I think the topic is worth debating, because there may be people on 3FC who think they have to get through a certain amount of water every day and find the task very onerous. Learning that it's not necessary could be helpful to them.

F.

nelie
05-11-2012, 09:30 AM
I tend to drink lots of water/liquids, sometimes I think it is too much it's generally not due to thirst though. I just like it.

sontaikle
05-11-2012, 09:46 AM
Well, there's a difference. Most people on this forum (including myself) aren't in tune with their hunger/fullness cues and/or have large appetites. I haven't heard of anyone here being out of touch with thirst cues or having an uncontrollable urge to drink water. On the contrary, most people have to WORK to get in the amount of water they think they need.

I think the topic is worth debating, because there may be people on 3FC who think they have to get through a certain amount of water every day and find the task very onerous. Learning that it's not necessary could be helpful to them.

F.

Part of the reason I think the idea is silly is that I too don't think we need that much water, but telling people "just drink when you're thirsty" doesn't really work. Some are still learning the difference between thirst and hunger, after all, and waiting around for that thirsty signal might just cause them to eat instead.

Having something like in the post (but maybe not SO MUCH water) could really help some people stave off eating and maybe in the long run learn the difference between hunger and thirst.

The only reason I drink as much water as I do is to stave off boredom eating. On days I'm busy I don't drink as much but I certainly suffer no ill effects from it.

Elladorine
05-11-2012, 12:39 PM
You know, when I was younger I was constantly thirsty. Everyone knew I was always looking for a drink (and a restroom)! And as my weight got higher it only got worse! I wasn't able to visit the doctor but I'm guessing I was prediabetic; when I changed my diet and cut out simple carbs, my extreme thirst went away.

One of my old problems was pure laziness. It was easier to grab a can of soda than pour a glass of water that I'd only have to wash later. :p Lame, I know! But that was my mindset for years, so I got a lot of unnecessary sugar and caffeine along with my drinks; plus I'm pretty sure I was an addict. I've since solved that by keeping refillable one liter bottles in the fridge at all times especially for filtered water. I have to remind myself to drink these days, but 99% of the time I make sure it's water (all other drinks are for special occasions). I probably go through two or more bottles a day, starting with my morning vitamins, and if I'm headed off somewhere, I grab a bottle to go. :)

Emmcakes
05-11-2012, 04:05 PM
Fabulous! You've found what works for you. The OP has found something that works for them, and that's just as fabulous.

Exactly my impression. I actually think that certain responses to the OP are snarky and disrespectful. Clearly SOME people believe that the OPs idea is a great one, and if it can help them get healthier then we should be happy for them and not condescending.

I personally am horrible at taking thirst cues from my body. I can be extremely thirsty but it's like my brain doesn't pick up on it. I have to take the time to ask myself "do I feel thirsty?" throughout the day to make sure I'm not ignoring my body. I am often dehydrated; I have been turned away several times from blood banks because my veins were too small to draw blood and even my hairdresser can tell by my hair. So if this water bottle trick helps me and others get water in, that's a GOOD THING.

PinkLotus
05-11-2012, 04:15 PM
Fabulous! You've found what works for you. The OP has found something that works for them, and that's just as fabulous.

This.

shanhat81
05-11-2012, 06:23 PM
I like this suggestion ... I'm one of those people who doesn't know how to listen to thirst cues (IDK why, I just never drink anything) and needs reminding/scheduling.

KYMommy2011
05-11-2012, 09:51 PM
How much water do I need to drink a day (in ounces if you can)? I'm always confused about this, different places say different things.. Is it possible to drink too much water in one day?? Does water count if you pour those little flavoring packets in it?

ValRock
05-11-2012, 10:11 PM
You should drink as much water as you feel like drinking.

Yes, flavored water counts. Just be careful of the sweetener, if you're sensitive to aspartame.

You can drink too much water. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication