Weight Loss Support - Dumb question about kitchen scale & liquids




lin43
01-21-2012, 03:30 PM
You were warned in the title . . . .


I bought a bottle of Bailey's Irish Cream liqueur to have along w/ my nightly espresso. According to what I've found out on the internet, 1 oz. is 117 calories. So, I was planning on putting my small glass (not really a "shot" glass--don't have any of those) on my kitchen scale and pouring in the Bailey's until my scale registers 1 oz. Would that be accurate? I don't know why, but I was thinking that there is some difference between fluid weights and solid weight??? I feel dumb asking that, but I would really like to be sure.

Thanks!


caryesings
01-21-2012, 03:34 PM
Use measuring cup for fluid ounces.

DietVet
01-21-2012, 03:50 PM
Liquids are measured by volume rather than weight. Use a measuring cup.


lin43
01-21-2012, 04:18 PM
Okay, but that means that 1 oz is only two tablespoons. Could that be right??

4star
01-21-2012, 04:19 PM
I used to have a little tiny measuring cup that looked like a shot glass with measurements. I actually found that volume stays pretty close to weight. When measuring things like dressings and alcohol, 1 oz ( approx. 28 grams) is roughly approximate to 2 tablespoons on most things. I didn't really see it differ much on anything I weighed, came right to the 2 tbsp marking.

berryblondeboys
01-21-2012, 04:22 PM
Weight is always the best way to measure. Ask any baker. Weigh it!

Trying to measure an ounce is nearly impossible by a measuring cup because 1 ounce is so very little. a shot glass holds (typically) 1.5 ounces, so you could fill one up 2/3s of the way to get a pretty accurate measurement... if your shot glass measures 1.5 ounces.. because they don't have a standard size!

Or, you could put a cup or shot glass or whatever small thing you want to measure, zero it out with the container/glass on the scale and then add your 1 oz. If I were you, I would put your coffee/espresso mug on the scale and measure directly in it and then add our espresso to the liqueur from there. Just zeroing out the scale with the mug on the scale before adding the liqueur.

4star
01-21-2012, 04:25 PM
Okay, but that means that 1 oz is only two tablespoons. Could that be right??

Yes. Here's a chart:

http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/convert/measurements.html

4star
01-21-2012, 04:28 PM
Weight is always the best way to measure. Ask any baker. Weigh it!

That is true. Oh how I love recipes for baked items that used weighed dry ingredients. They are the same every time you bake them!

ennay
01-21-2012, 04:35 PM
Weight is always the best way to measure. Ask any baker. Weigh it!

Trying to measure an ounce is nearly impossible by a measuring cup because 1 ounce is so very little. a shot glass holds (typically) 1.5 ounces, so you could fill one up 2/3s of the way to get a pretty accurate measurement... if your shot glass measures 1.5 ounces.. because they don't have a standard size!

Or, you could put a cup or shot glass or whatever small thing you want to measure, zero it out with the container/glass on the scale and then add your 1 oz. If I were you, I would put your coffee/espresso mug on the scale and measure directly in it and then add our espresso to the liqueur from there. Just zeroing out the scale with the mug on the scale before adding the liqueur.

BUT fluid ounce and ounce weight are not the same. For most liquids it is fairly close though - usually well within the measurement capabilities of your scale or measuring cups. But that is pretty easy to determine. Measure 2T, weigh it. If your scale is like mine (1/8th oz increments) it probably wont make a difference. In that case go with whichever is easiest. But berry is right, most shot glasses hold significantly more than 1 oz.

(OTOH many semisolids like jam are sold by the ounce (wt) and I know from cooking that 1 fl. oz of jam = about 1.5 oz.wt. )

lin43
01-21-2012, 05:12 PM
I used to have a little tiny measuring cup that looked like a shot glass with measurements. I actually found that volume stays pretty close to weight. When measuring things like dressings and alcohol, 1 oz ( approx. 28 grams) is roughly approximate to 2 tablespoons on most things. I didn't really see it differ much on anything I weighed, came right to the 2 tbsp marking.

Thank you--great idea!

Berry, thanks to you to (and to the others who posted!!:) ) for the tips. I agree with the other poster who wished that all recipe ingredients were given in weights. I love my kitchen scale and, to me, it would be so much easier to just weigh and "tare" than to use all those measuring cups & spoons.

jayohwhy
01-21-2012, 05:21 PM
What i do with liquids is that i use grams to weight out 28 grams which is equal to 1 oz in weight