General chatter - The Evil HR Lady hates me




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wurdnerd
06-02-2011, 06:03 AM
I've always suspected it, but I found out for sure yesterday, when talking to my boss about a job opening in our department. It would be a step up for me, so of course I want to apply. He wouldn't give me specifics, but said she is "not a fan". Fortunately, the boss likes me and knows my work, so there is still hope.

My guess is that since I've questioned some unfair policies in the past, I've been labeled as a troublemaker. Or, maybe it's just one of those personality things. I'm "passionate" about things I believe in and she's... well let's be nice and call it cold and unemotional.

Anybody have similar bad experiences?


BerkshireGrl
06-02-2011, 06:44 AM
I have, and outlasted those employees when it came to layoffs ;)

I wouldn't worry about her opinion (still being polite and professional to her, of course) unless she has the power to actually promote you, and I would think only your boss can do that? Good luck! :)

JessLess
06-02-2011, 07:06 AM
This has just been my experience, but I hope that it can help other people. This is a generalization, but HR exists to protect the interests of management. If you complain to HR about things that you think are unfair, you will not be doing yourself any favors. Deal with it with your boss instead.


irishlad
06-02-2011, 07:12 AM
I agree, I would hope her profesionalism and not personal dislike would come through and the best candidate for the job, would get it. You never know, even is she isnt your biggest fan, she may still think you are suited for the role, so basically you questioning issues could help you, if she sees it in a professional and not personal sense. Would also agree with above poster that sometimes your boss is first port of call for issues, let them then take further action if neccessary.

bargoo
06-02-2011, 08:46 AM
This has just been my experience, but I hope that it can help other people. This is a generalization, but HR exists to protect the interests of management. If you complain to HR about things that you think are unfair, you will not be doing yourself any favors. Deal with it with your boss instead.

I have experienced this , as well. Jess is giving you good advice.

fitness4life
06-02-2011, 09:53 AM
I agree with Jess, too.

How big is the company? How big is your town?

What I've learned going from a big city to a small rural town is that their rules are different. Or at least, with less people, the broken rules can't escape into anonymity like they can in the city.

What I mean is, in my small town, it's likely you won't get hired simply based on personality clashes. In my town, if a perfectly qualified individual goes up for a job against a spouse of an employee, the spouse will get the job. Relatives are promoted above all others - even in the public school! Someone's past *will* haunt them for the rest of their life. All of this, while I didn't see any of it happen in the city, either doesn't exist there or is not as obvious due to the larger number of people.

Amberelise
06-02-2011, 12:11 PM
I concur with Jess as well. My firm has had two mass layoffs over the past two years. Both times the folks that hassled HR were the ones to go.

Lovely
06-02-2011, 04:49 PM
Catbert the "evil director of human resources" isn't just a cartoon.

There's one in every company.

wurdnerd
06-02-2011, 05:35 PM
Funny how words get twisted....

I said I questioned a policy, I did not complain or hassle her. Never raised my voice. Never threatened. Just questioned. If she took issue with that it's her problem not mine.

Actually, let me rephrase that, since her personal problems could affect me. Her utterly failing to answer said question plus holding a grudge afterward makes her a piss-poor excuse for a HRM.

wurdnerd
06-02-2011, 06:32 PM
Ok, I realize that sounded incredibly childish. Just goes to show how upset I am over this. I didn't sleep much last night, and probably won't tonight either.

It's just such a b**** that HR can be as unprofessional as they want, can make people's work-life miserable, ruin careers... and never pay for their actions.

In case anyone is wondering, the policy I questioned was why there was such a large difference between exempt and non-exempt rules. At our company, non-exempt workers are treated like criminals on probation... never to be trusted. We also get a fraction of the benefits enjoyed by the exempt population. How is that fair and what is wrong with asking why?
:?:

bargoo
06-02-2011, 06:41 PM
Doesn't have anything to do with fairness. They make the rules and do not appreciate having thei decisions questioned. Sometimes you just have to keep your mouth shut. Think of it as job security.