100 lb. Club - rockinrobin (and other big losers)




SCraver
10-21-2010, 04:26 PM
This question is for rockinrobin - or any of the big losers that I have come to admire!

I have been thinking A LOT all week. It has been a rough week for me. I have really come A LONG way from where I once was in my eating habits. And I am proud of my acomplishments... but this week has been rough and I STILL battle with the evenings. I have some ideas I want to try in order to over come this last big obstacle (like setting up an exercise room so I can do a short walk in the evenings or some yoga) and I have been really focusing on WHY I have had a hard time this week. WHY I let myself over eat in the evenings. And, rockinrobin, I could just picture you responding with: "make a plan for the evening and stick to it. Period. Quit screwing around" (although, you would word it better, and then I would pout upon reading it, only to realize you were right).

Ok - getting on with it. I get the impression from your posts that one day, you made a plan and that was that. You have stuck with it and have been successful ever since. I was wondering if you might be willing to share any final obsticles that you may have had to over come that took a few trys before you got it right. OR - have you really just been able to stick with your plan all along?


mandalinn82
10-21-2010, 04:33 PM
This was not my experience. I did struggle, a lot, including a 6 month plateau that was at least half self-induced (wedding had happened, and I was simply less motivated to kick my own butt for a while). I still sometimes struggle. It took me a lot of tries to figure out eating out at restaurants (since I do it so rarely, I always approached it as a "treat", then hit a month where I had a LOT of restaurants, which did not go so well), and business travel (which I am STILL trying to work out..I actually eat way too little on business trips or when I'm really busy, which has at least once resulted in me passing out in the shower after a 6am workout from a combination of low blood sugar and exhaustion).

It took three separate major injuries to stop medicating physical pain with food, and I really only worked it out when I had an injury lasting FOREVER (18 months and counting). My instinct is "I had to get cortisone shots and they hurt, therefore and ergo, I deserve lots of ice cream", and I still sometimes fall into that trap.

I have definitely not been able to stick with my plan all along, and I still do fall off even now. It may not be everyone's experience, but it is mine.

time2lose
10-21-2010, 04:40 PM
Well, SCraver, I am not Robin, or even come close but your post touched me. I feel like I am succeeding this time. I still have a long way to go, but I have lost over 100 pounds. There have been times when my plan and weight loss went smoothly, even was easy. There were other times that I struggled. Night time eating is one of my struggles too. I think that persistence is more important than perfection. Keep working on those problem areas. Don't give up and you will succeed!


guamvixen
10-21-2010, 04:44 PM
I agree with Mandalinn. She made some great points! For me it was trial and error. The first half of my weight was lost by working out, and loosely watching what I ate, the rest of it was by calorie counting. There were times when I was TOO hard on myself, and there were times when I was too loose with myself. Here's the kicker, I still go through that.

In maintenance, I'm still trying to adjust to the new lifestyle. I "try" to plan, but like lots of things, plans change. To make it more challenging, I'm 31 weeks pregnant, so at first I almost went back to old habits, but then I realized I couldn't. I've done very well thus far by eating healthy, and of course I still allow cheat days, what pregnant woman doesn't crave doritos and cream cheese from time to time, but in the end, I remember how hard I worked to get here, and I don't want to go back.

xty
10-21-2010, 04:57 PM
I do get the impression that some people here have been able to figure out what works for them and stick with it, which is great!

But for me it has been a completely different story. From 240lbs+ to my current 127lbs it has been over 10 years, with many many ups and downs.

The big key for me in lessening the sense of struggle, was that 2 years ago I basically decided I didnt need to figure it all out - that I could be ok even if I didnt ever have some magical silver bullet fix. And also that I didnt need to be a certain size anymore, I need to be strong and healthy and have a good quality of life!

So my new plan is adaptation and trying to stay one-step ahead of what I will need to do to adapt. More specifically what I mean is that:
- as my body composition changes, so do my caloric/protein/fiber/fat needs...I adapt to that rather than having one eating plan
- as my body habituates to one exercise I both get bored and it gets less effective, I try to figure out what else I like and can do in the right season so I have something queued up
- as I go thru phases of less motivation I see what are keys for keeping me on plan, stick with those keys always..and also figure out what helps get me back on plan
Things are easier these days. I dont feel like "Im screwing up", I just feel like I might be still figuring it out.

Hang in there.

rockinrobin
10-21-2010, 05:38 PM
I think it's VERY important to be aware of where your *issues* are and find a way around them. But you know what, your issues will change. They won't remain the same. You've got to be open to seeing and recognizing this - and adjust accordingly.

Night time eating?

I've changed that up over the years and I think I am ready to do it again.

I started out making a cut off time for the evenings. And yes - I stuck to it like glue. Like glue. But a few months in (not sure how long exactly), I was *wanting* something in the evenings. Soooo, I shifted my calories around and placed some calories there.

For me, my eating is almost a ritual. I rely heavily on repeating the same things over and over again. I know exactly what I'm eating and it's just - easier. It is incredibly automatic to me. I don't have to think about it. I'm eating this, this and this and there's nothing to think about.

I spoke about changing my nighttime up. Well, it's come to be that I've saved a lot of calories for the night, but lately I've been a little not hungry, but *nudge-y* during the day.... soooo, I'm afraid I'll have to take some calories from the evening and place them into the day. And I've been reluctant to do so, because I'm not used to it. And I'm afraid that I won't be able to stick with it. I'm afraid that I'll add in those calories during the day and then my nighttime ritual will have to change - and what if I can't do it. What if I eat add in those calories during the day, have not as much left for the night and wind up eating the usual night stuff.. So, I've remained *nudge-y* during the day.

I suppose I will just have to suck it up, add in those calories to the day and CHANGE my night time routine and eventually THAT will become my ritual.

And really, I DO believe it's just a matter of what you get used to. But you have to get to the point where you're used to it! You've got to push yourself. And I'm fairly certain that I CAN get used to my new idea. But I'm struggling with even the THOUGHT of doing it.

I don't know if I answered your question or not, but I did want to bring up the fact that I too struggle. And more importantly - that it's okay to not have it all figured out from the start, but please, please, please be open to changing things up.

Another thing. Yes, do make a plan, but make it easier to stick to that plan. Lay some road blocks for yourself. The best one in my opinion - don't put it in your mouth till it's written down on paper FIRST. Commit to doing this no matter what. NO MATTER WHAT. HAve the right foods on hand - the wrong ones OUT OF THE HOUSE. Have your food mapped out, each and every bite, lick, taste, crumb and sip. Much easier to stay on plan, when you've got one.

You've made some great changes. You are a work in progress, as we all are. We just need to keep on progressing. :)

Edited to add: I just wanted to add here, that there ARE going to be some uncomfortable moments. You have to realize that and be willing to push through it. Ending a lifetime of unhealthy behaviors is going to involve more than a few episodes of telling yourself no and that's not so *pleasant* shall we say - initially. You do get used to it. And of course, you then no longer *want* as much. Your priorities shift. You LEARN how to deal with it. But you do have to push yourself in order to grow, in order to better yourself, in order to prosper.

There will be times when you'll be riding high and this will all seem so easy breezy and then out of no where - smack - you're struggling again. But it passes. It passes. And ahhhh, what a relief when it does.

Can you say *roller coaster*????

cfmama
10-21-2010, 05:38 PM
I've lost over 170 pounds. The first year? Pretty much went awesome. I had my gall bladder taken out and stayed on plan. Things were great! Lost 155 lbs in that year. The first half of the second year? Awesome! Stuck to plan and lost 25 more pounds!

Then... depression happened. I took a "maintenance" break for the summer and gained back 15 pounds. I realized that I HAVE TO deal with the mental part of me gaining weight. I HAVE TO deal with my depression while moving forward.

So yah. i made a plan. I stuck to it. Until big scary stuff got in the way. So now I'm back on plan. And sticking to it. And I know that with counseling, medication, my chickies and ME that I can finally get to my goal weight.

So a year ago? my answer was different.

nelie
10-21-2010, 05:50 PM
Sometimes you are going to have hard weeks, that is normal. You aren't failing if you have a hard week, you just have to adjust to find what works for you and keep the idea that a slip is not a failure, it is a blip.

Terre
10-21-2010, 06:58 PM
My main thing is "I AM WORTH THIS". No one or nothing can make this happen except me.

My hardest thing has been eating out. The other night my Mom, My Sister and her friend and I went to watch my nephew at a band concert. On the way they wanted to stop and eat. So we stopped. It was the southern belle. Doesn't the name just tell you what they serve....homemade southern food :( well I sat down and ordered a water. Then when they ordered their food, I was asked what I wanted and I said "NOTHING" they couldn't believe it. My Mom said well she hasnt lost 105lbs eating stuff like this... Yea me!!!

I put my before picture on the fridge when I started this journey. SO when I get to craving and head to the fridge I have to look at that picture. I then realize I am not that hungry.
That has really helped me to.

Coming here daily has helped tons. Joining the challenges also keep me accountable.

It's hard....really hard at times. Easy most of the time. This is a life style so you need to find where you are comfortable and stay there. If its really low calories for breakfast and lunch then a better dinner to make you feel like you are satisfied then by all means.....calories are calories.



Good Luck!!!

Lyn2007
10-21-2010, 06:58 PM
I don't know if I qualify as a "big loser" YET, as I am at 99 pounds gone. BUT, it has taken me over 3 years to do that. I had a lot of stuff to work through mentally and emotionally AND I had to tweak my plan every time I had a long plateau. But the main thing is DO NOT GIVE UP. Yes, make a plan and stick with it but be willing to change when necessary. Try new things to see what works. And if you find yourself gaining or not losing, dig deep and get to the root of the mental/emotional reasons. Because I did all that work, I feel like I have a whole new attitude and relationship with food that I hope will last me forever.

Shmead
10-21-2010, 07:02 PM
For me, I think it was really important that I started with a high calorie limit the first few months--like 2500 for a few weeks, and then down to 2000. At 300 lbs, I still lost weight and I was still hungry, but I wasn't starving. Every other diet I'd started, I started at 1200 calories, and that meant that pretty much all my willpower went into NOT EATING. I didn't have any mind left for planning, or experimenting, or just sitting around thinking about how things were working out and what tweaks might be a good idea.

Once I had my routines in place, it was really pretty simple to cut back a hundred calories or so a week--and then, as my capacity for exercise increased, they went back up!

atreyyena
10-21-2010, 07:14 PM
I've always been horrible with night time eating, or at least I used to be..... I'm still nowhere near where I ultimately want to be, and have other totally separate issues, but a combination of two things worked for the night time eating for me:

I researched about fat cells, and about how you always have the same number, they just shrink (they get less fatty too!). That your fat cells realize when they begin to shrink and send false hunger signals. So when it was night time and I knew I wasn't really hungry, I'd just tell my fat cells to shut up.

Also, I eventually had to have my husband physically restrain me from food at night for about a month. One night I was grumpy and sarcastic and really mean, and it made me realize how powerful those urges are. I still have urges to eat when I'm not hungry, but they're more spread out throughout the day. Also I've found if I almost overeat during dinner, I REALLY don't feel hungry at night, and for a while that helped. I stayed within calorie type of things, but saved it up and that seemed to help. I can handle being hungry during the day, but the night is the worst.

Onederchic
10-21-2010, 07:22 PM
I've lost 160 pounds and though I try to stay strict, I haven't the entire time. I falter but I don't let it keep me down and that is what I am proud of.

SCraver
10-21-2010, 08:11 PM
Thank you all SO MUCH! I am going to print this thread and read it whenever I feel like I did this week. When I feel like I have a mountain that I don't know how to get over. It is a relief to know that no one is perfect. And that this journey is hard for everyone. To remember that there will be easy days, too.

I am sitting on my couch right now... catching up on Grey's Anatomy and Private Practice. I ate my PLANNED dinner and now I am munching on my PLANNED snack and that. is. it. If I feel like I want to eat everything in the house - I will just go to bed!

I feel like I can do this... NO - I KNOW I can do this.

matt_H
10-21-2010, 09:06 PM
I'm into my 4th year now on this episode of weight loss. It has been a series of victories and setbacks. There was a period of time when I was in a month long slide (into the second year of this) that I gained back significant amounts of weight. I had, at that point, given up and was back into the old routines when by chance a friend of mine started talking about wanting to lose weight and be healthier and she basically remotivated me to start again.

Robin is so right when she talks about the "ritual". It is so much easier when you make food choices by routine. You know what you are going to eat and you don't have to think about it.

Its a struggle and it isn't easy, but most of the good things in life and things you have to work for. The good news is everyone has the ability to do it.

kaplods
10-21-2010, 10:57 PM
All my previous weight loss attempts, I was (in the begining of each attempt) extremely committed and extremely motivated and focused - putting absolutely every ounce of strength I had into the weight loss. It made for extremely rapid weight loss, but I had nothing positive in my life except for the weight loss. When the weight loss would slow, it felt like I had absolutely nothing positive in my life - I'd get frustrated and give up.

Now, I'm one of the poorest excuses for a dieter. I'm just not willing to make drastic changes anymore. All 85 lbs lost were at a rather pitiful pace (except the first 20 which were accidental - no effort on my part - the result of being treated for sleep apnea with a cpap machine).

In some ways, I've lost all 85 lbs without really trying (at least not very hard). Nearly effortless weight loss has a huge price - speed (or rather lack of it). I know that I can try harder and lose faster, or I can barely try and lose at a snail's pace. Some days I'm willing to try harder than others, but the only thing I'm not willing to do is give up - and that's allowed me to succeed even if it is at a snail's pace.

The more I do, the more I'm willing to do, but by the typical way we view dieting, what I'm doing often doesn't even qualify as success. Every diet I quit, I quit losing more rapidly than I am now. It makes me realize how weight loss was always in my grasp, if only I had decided that weight gain wasn't an option. I didn't have to lose weight every week, I only had to stop gaining and whenever I did lose a pound make sure I never gained that one back.

My weight has fluctuated, but has never had a major backslide in about six years now. I can't say that of any other year in my life. There were always defeats and backsliding.

There are a lot of ways to succeed, and a lot of different speeds at which a person can succeed- but for all success there has to be a commitment to forward motion. Not giving up is the only strategy universal to all successes.

ubergirl
10-21-2010, 10:58 PM
I don't know if I count as a "big loser" either, but I can certainly relate to your post-- even posted a plea for help of my own a few days ago...

I completely agree with Robin and Matt that it is the ritual that makes it all easier. For years, I attributed my eating issues to all kinds of psychological/emotional things never realizing how much of my behavior was also ingrained very bad habits.

For the most part, over the past year, I've been able to harness that to the good. I formed new habits and stuck to them like glue. It was really hard at first, but then it just got WAY easier until it seemed like no effort at all.

But recently, I moved and changed jobs, which has been a huge upheaval in my life. It completely changed my routine, and I'm still struggling to find new rituals. What I've discovered about myself is that whenever I feel like there is a choice I tend to make the wrong choice. I don't do very well with "should I eat some, how much? Can I have a bite?" and I don't do very well with "should I go to the gym, do I have time, am I tired."...

This is a humbling process, but if it's a process that is going to work for life, then we HAVE to find ways to stick with it even when the going is not good....

rockinrobin
10-21-2010, 11:57 PM
I completely agree with Robin and Matt that it is the ritual that makes it all easier. For years, I attributed my eating issues to all kinds of psychological/emotional things never realizing how much of my behavior was also ingrained very bad habits.

Using the word ritual came to me just the other day. It came to me because I thought it even stronger than habit.

And it's funny, it came about as I thought of my night time, well ritual, which is what the OP mentioned as her issue as of late.

I've seen many posts here recently about night time eating and it got me to thinking about my own night time eating. I've got it SO down pat. I NEVER veer from it. And I realized that what I do is even MORE than habit. It is indeed ritual-like.

For the most part, over the past year, I've been able to harness that to the good. I formed new habits and stuck to them like glue. It was really hard at first, but then it just got WAY easier until it seemed like no effort at all.

Call it what you want - habit, ritual, automating your food - for me, it's what was necessary. And of course it didn't start out that way. I DID have to push myself past that initial *discomfort*. I did have to learn how to tell myself no. I did make my plan and stuck to it like glue, yes glue. I found that much easier. I remembered in the past how difficult it was to get back ON plan, when I went OFF. My solution - don't go off, then there's nothing to get back ON.

I've said this before, but I do believe people make this whole process much harder than need be by *giving in so easily*. On several fronts. Every time you *give in*, you delay the good habits forming, but worse than that - you re-enforce the bad habits. It's an awful combination. It was the right decision. I know many of you can't fathom this, but not giving in, made it so much easier, because unbelievably quickly, I didn't WANT to give in. It's kinda hard to explain. I know there are a few on this board who went this route, and I know they know what I speak of.

I know I will change, life will change, my circumstances will change and I will have to change my plan along with them. Which is why I am struggling now with even the thought of changing up my night time ritual. But I must to accommodate my daytime *ritual*, as it has hit a bump.

And I do know that I will just have to *work past this new discomfort*, and I will - and then I will have a new daytime ritual and night time ritual. But until it becomes ritual, that's where I will *struggle*.

And yes, my *struggles* have all pretty much come after I lost all the weight and have entered maintenance. I had an absolute BLAST during the time I was losing. A blast. It was a thrill a minute.

I keep putting asterisks around the word struggle, because really, it's not THAT much of a struggle (thanks to the habits, the rituals, and my desire to remain slim). The real struggle was being super morbidly obese. I can't ever forget that, so the *struggles* I have now are nothing, nothing compared to the real struggles of being super morbidly obese. I have to keep it in perspective. I have to remember just how hard that was. I can't use such strong words to describe what I do now to keep myself slim, even when I am going through a rough patch. Which luckily doesn't happen all that often.

Lots of rambling. Not sure if any of this made any sense. It really is hard for me to put these thoughts into words.:dizzy:

Glory87
10-22-2010, 01:01 AM
This question is for rockinrobin - or any of the big losers that I have come to admire!

I have been thinking A LOT all week. It has been a rough week for me. I have really come A LONG way from where I once was in my eating habits. And I am proud of my acomplishments... but this week has been rough and I STILL battle with the evenings. I have some ideas I want to try in order to over come this last big obstacle (like setting up an exercise room so I can do a short walk in the evenings or some yoga) and I have been really focusing on WHY I have had a hard time this week. WHY I let myself over eat in the evenings. And, rockinrobin, I could just picture you responding with: "make a plan for the evening and stick to it. Period. Quit screwing around" (although, you would word it better, and then I would pout upon reading it, only to realize you were right).

Ok - getting on with it. I get the impression from your posts that one day, you made a plan and that was that. You have stuck with it and have been successful ever since. I was wondering if you might be willing to share any final obsticles that you may have had to over come that took a few trys before you got it right. OR - have you really just been able to stick with your plan all along?

I made a plan and stuck to it like glue. I put a lot of food on my "forever no" list (no fast food, no packaged cookies, no chips, no pretzels, no sugary soda) and that made things a lot easier. I never really ate much after dinner, ever. My tough time was the afternoon, so I have a strategies for fighting afternoon munchies (plan frequent small snacks, drink a lot of hot tea, stay busy).

My obstacles are unplanned food and social situations. I manage this by staying carefully on plan as much as possible. One afternoon of wine and cheese did not make me fat. I get back on track IMMEDIATELY.

Glory87
10-22-2010, 01:08 AM
I've said this before, but I do believe people make this whole process much harder than need be by *giving in so easily*. On several fronts. Every time you *give in*, you delay the good habits forming, but worse than that - you re-enforce the bad habits. It's an awful combination. It was the right decision. I know many of you can't fathom this, but not giving in, made it so much easier, because unbelievably quickly, I didn't WANT to give in. It's kinda hard to explain. I know there are a few on this board who went this route, and I know they know what I speak of.

Like usual, I agree with Robin. I mentally view giving in as a "slippery slope." As an example, if I so hungry and tired after work that I feel it's okay to get fast food, it would be easier to do it again and again. So, I don't order pizza or eat fast food. It seems like pizza and fast food would be "easy" things in life, but to me NOT having them in my life makes things so much easier.

I'm sure normal people would say I have food issues, because it's like a mental block. There are so many things that I just won't eat. Let's take something like a full size Hershey bar (I love them, used to eat one at least 2-3 times a week). Now, it's like my mind says Idonteatthat. I haven't eaten one since I changed my life (a few minis here or there). I do buy nice bars of chocolate from World Market, but I eat 100 calories at a time. It is a ritual. A nice safe ritual that keeps me from binging.

Where I slip up is slooow creeping. Portion sizes get a little big. We go out to eat more than once a week and I'm not as careful. I get a 120 calorie biscotti with my latte. I go a little crazy with the peanut butter on toast. I want a glass of wine every night. I do that for a couple of months and whammo, I'm up 5 lbs and my pants are tight.

Jojo381972
10-22-2010, 01:13 AM
This thread is inspiring and helpful. Thanks! It is good to know that everyone went through a long road of ups and downs. The tips are great for someone just starting out! Congrats on the big losses! Ya losers ;)

catherinef
10-22-2010, 03:06 AM
For me, I've known pretty much all along what I HAD to do, in order to lose the weight and keep it off. And what I mean by that is how to eat, how to exercise, etc. It's not a big secret, after all. I knew the mechanics. They'd worked for me in the past a couple of times, and even though I always burned out or got distracted by life and let the weight loss slip away, I KNEW it would work if I could just, you know, DO IT.

So when I started up a couple of years ago, I really didn't have to think about how I was going to do it. I just had to tell myself, in the starkest possible terms, that in order to do this thing, I was going to have to commit FOREVER. That there would be no end. I was, in fact, going to have to get up every single day for the rest of my life, and stick to a calorie budget. I was going to have to get used to saying No to myself. Over and over again. And, yes, I would slip, and yes, holidays and vacations and special events happen, and yes, there would be times when I would eat stuff I knew wasn't going to fit my plan, but that doesn't change the essence of what I was going to have to commit to: getting up every day and doing what was necessary to lose the weight and keep it off. I established a couple of rules to deal with stuff like the holidays and other celebrations and such, which are pretty simple:

Never Two Days in a Row. Never. Because that was my sliding point in the past. Two days turn into three, and before I know it, I'm right back to my old bad habits.

"Oh, Well, I've Blown it Now..." Gone. Because I haven't. I am not going to instantly gain back 200+ pounds because I ate a muffin or whatever. If I eat something off-plan, for whatever reason, I then have a choice. Do I do damage control, by seeing if I can fit it in by eliminating something else? Or do I just accept that, OK, that muffin was a bad idea, there's no helping it now, and I'm just going back to the rest of my planned eating for today, and taking the hit and moving on. "Oh well, I've blown it now, what else can I eat since the day is RUINED anyway..." is no longer one of my choices.

Really, it all sounds simplistic, but the key was accepting that I had to change, and I had to do it permanently.

Oboegal
10-22-2010, 11:27 PM
Glory87, something clicked when you mentioned the "slippery slope". I am looser than some of the people here about when I eat, and what kinds of food I eat, but I stay absolutely firm about sticking to a budget of 1400 calories a day because I'm a little worried that allowing myself to go over without "paying it back" would send me down the slippery slope.

I mentioned in another thread that I am currently "in debt" for 1100 calories, but I expect to have it "paid off" by the end of October (and I've paid off bigger calorie debts in the past). There was one time recently when I "wrote off" a calorie debt for what I felt was a good reason. I was a bit worried about that opening the door to other excuses, but it hasn't, and I feel really good about the fact that I passed a fairly significant test of my new lifestyle.

Trazey34
10-23-2010, 01:32 AM
It took me 3 + years to lose all this. It wasn't easy, no way, but it was impossibly hard either. For me, it wasn't commitment at all ~ let's face it, I'd "committed" to a diet every Monday morning for 20 years, but it fell apart by Wednesday lol. So, instead, I went to therapy, did some talking at the same time that I was cutting back on fast food and treats at night; I'd go for a short walk. When that didn't KILL ME lol i grudgingly thought maybe I could do more. So I'd do a bit more. After about 20 pounds I thought "hmmm how curious that eating less junk means I lose some weight" and the lightbulb went on. I tweaked, I read, I found what worked for ME, what I could live with. After about 40 pounds I maintained for about 4 months to be sure I could "live" that way. Then I cut back some more, did more walking, counted calories, kept talking in therapy, worked on why I was such a spoiled little brat who thought she deserved to eat what she wanted without consequences.

I could never be the kind of person who can't have XY or Z in the house because I'll devour it. I had to deal with that. At first I was "i will never eat after 8p.m" and that solved a problem...for a while. But things change, situations change, you aren't always in 100% control of things. The only thing I AM 100% control of is ME. I lived for almost 2 years with never having ice cream or sweets in the house, thinking that THAT alone would solve my problems. And it did for a while, but sh~t happens right???

I've enjoyed therapy and found a sense of freedom I've never experienced. I'm in control of ME so I don't have to control every single external force in the universe to ensure my success. I had to know that no food had that much power over me, because for ME it would always and inevitably WIN - maybe not this year or next, but eventually. So I fought those demons and arrived on the other side SANE. Thinner, which is awesome, but SANITY is priceless!

ubergirl
10-23-2010, 10:55 AM
Like usual, I agree with Robin. I mentally view giving in as a "slippery slope." As an example, if I so hungry and tired after work that I feel it's okay to get fast food, it would be easier to do it again and again. So, I don't order pizza or eat fast food. It seems like pizza and fast food would be "easy" things in life, but to me NOT having them in my life makes things so much easier.

I'm sure normal people would say I have food issues, because it's like a mental block. There are so many things that I just won't eat. Let's take something like a full size Hershey bar (I love them, used to eat one at least 2-3 times a week). Now, it's like my mind says Idonteatthat. I haven't eaten one since I changed my life (a few minis here or there). I do buy nice bars of chocolate from World Market, but I eat 100 calories at a time. It is a ritual. A nice safe ritual that keeps me from binging.

Where I slip up is slooow creeping. Portion sizes get a little big. We go out to eat more than once a week and I'm not as careful. I get a 120 calorie biscotti with my latte. I go a little crazy with the peanut butter on toast. I want a glass of wine every night. I do that for a couple of months and whammo, I'm up 5 lbs and my pants are tight.

Glory-- this is exactly, exactly me. I absolutely have the "i don't eat this" mechanism.... and it works very well.

But I also struggle with the sloooow creeping-- eating a little extra of the stuff I normally eat.... it usually happens after my weight loss has stalled for a while and I start to get this "oh what difference does it make?" mindset creeping in.

But the other day, I ordered pizza for my kids because I had a lot of work to do and no time to cook, but the silly thing is, I cooked anyway-- because I wasn't about to eat pizza.... because it's hard enough to keep weight loss on track battling the sloooow creep. If I started wondering how many slices of pizza I was going to eat, and whether it was okay to eat french fries from time to time, I'd be sunk.

Rosinante
10-23-2010, 11:06 AM
I am also in the "I don't eat that" camp. It takes decision-making out of the equation, and works for me.

calluna
10-23-2010, 01:05 PM
I do, too. It helps, but isn't a panacea for me. Sometimes I say "I don't eat that" and my appetite says "And your point is what, exactly?"

I will always, always have to be careful and argue with my desire. But saying "I don't eat that" often enough will beat my appetite into disgruntled submission ... most of the time.

Idealmuse
11-22-2010, 04:59 AM
Okay I know this post is old, but I just ran into it as I haven't been around much recently. Replying because I was JUST thinking of writing something similar. On one hand I'm really bad with anything that is super strict or structured. I think it's because when I make mistakes I have a tendency to feel like I've failed. I'm willing to do some things for life like record my food and exercise, but too much structure historically has been a bad method for me.

Now it's ridiculous for me to say this on one hand, because one of my main ingredients for success has been my commitment to training for triathlons... You know starting out small and building up to large ridiculous ones. For some reason that kind of structure had worked for me.

I guess food is just an entirely different issue. Commitment is no problem. Addiction another.

So some of us can make a 360, and some of us can't. But, while I'm not at goal and I've had ups and downs over the past 3 years I've been around or under 200 for over a year now, and I've been under 240 for probably about 3, so I would say that's somewhat of a success. I'm struggling with focus for buckling down to lose the last 1/3. 50 pounds.

So no.. I'm not the stuck to the plan the whole time kinda girl Maybe that's why my success has been a mixed bag.

But I really enjoyed reading these posts - Give me something to think about as well, and thought it could use a bump up.

JOLINA
11-22-2010, 06:31 AM
I don't know if I qualify as a "big loser" YET, as I am at 99 pounds gone. BUT, it has taken me over 3 years to do that. I had a lot of stuff to work through mentally and emotionally AND I had to tweak my plan every time I had a long plateau. But the main thing is DO NOT GIVE UP. Yes, make a plan and stick with it but be willing to change when necessary. Try new things to see what works. And if you find yourself gaining or not losing, dig deep and get to the root of the mental/emotional reasons. Because I did all that work, I feel like I have a whole new attitude and relationship with food that I hope will last me forever.

:wave:
You are a "big winner". I read some of your blog. :hug:
You are a wonderful person to have been able to overcome a lot of obstacles along your life's journey.
You are doing so well raising your kids and being a good mom. :angel:

I am 1 inch taller than you, and plan to go down to 175.
Then I might set a lower goal to 135. Get really skinny again.
When you get down to your goal, maybe you will set a lower goal too.
Keep up the good work! :)

:goodluck:

Trazey34
11-22-2010, 11:06 AM
great reading these! I loved my own post ROFL I still feel exactly the same way :D