Weight Loss Support - Overwhelmed by the Hype!! Help!!!




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jendiet
07-06-2010, 06:15 PM
Ok, this usually happens after i've been back on plan 2 weeks or so...have seen a little bit of weight loss, but not dramatic results. I get caught up in the HYPE

the sugar burner vs. fat burner
only eat high protein and NO CARBS
eat good fats and NO BAD fats
if you do this it will speed up your weight loss....
best exercise for weight loss is THIS not THAT!

I took some before pics for this go round, and it always makes me feel so insecure and like I want to hurry up and get the process over with...AND i start thinking, what can I do this time, to not get derailed during a plateau or such...

and then I feel bombarded with HYPE...

please just share with me, you weight lossers with the BASIC regimine of eating healthier and exercising more...how you lost your weight and how this BASIC formula is keeping you from gaining it back!


EZMONEY
07-06-2010, 06:38 PM
You're killin' me kid!

Hugs....

for me it's simple.....calories in....calories out!

I blow it all the time as you well know but bottom line...for me...if I spend more calories than I take in I lose weight.

Be good!

gardenerjoy
07-06-2010, 06:43 PM
What's worked for me are the books by Judith Beck. She specializes in applying Cognitive Behavioral Techniques to weight loss. The Beck Diet Solution is not a diet, but helps you stay on whatever diet you choose. The Complete Beck Diet for Life has a healthy eating plan included.

The principles that have helped me most are planning (for several months, I wrote my food plan out the night before until things got so engrained that I can plan it in my head most days) and persistence (I rarely go off plan, but when I do I try to figure out why that happened and how to prevent it from happening again -- and then get right back to it). I've actually now been on three different diets, starting a new one when I plateaued after each twenty pound loss. There are lots of healthy ways to lose weight -- I say, choose one and try it for awhile. You can always try another later on to see how it fits for you.

You have a great start, recognizing that your desire for drama leads you to want to trust the hype, and reframing that desire to one for a basic plan that leads to long term weight loss and maintenance.


Onederchic
07-06-2010, 06:47 PM
You're killin' me kid!

Hugs....

for me it's simple.....calories in....calories out!

I blow it all the time as you well know but bottom line...for me...if I spend more calories than I take in I lose weight.

Be good!


For me as well.

mthrgoos68
07-06-2010, 06:48 PM
For me it's pretty simple too.... Less food,more action. I still to a certain calorie amount, and I exercise. Calories in, calories out. It's not an exact science, it takes tweaking to find out exactly what works for you, but you can do it. Avoid the hype and the craziness and work on finding a healthy lifestyle that works for you. What you can live with long term.

You CAN do this!!

asharksrevenge
07-06-2010, 07:05 PM
The weight loss industry is filled with hype because no one has found the "perfect" diet/exercise solution for every overweight person. One decade focuses on very low calorie eating, another on ultra fitness regimens. I have found combining all of these ideas into a practical, easy and manageable plan for myself has worked so far. If my body begins to respond in a way I'm not comfortable with (like gaining weight :lol: ), I will change and fine-tune my plan. It's worked before and it will work again! Good luck finding a plan that works for you!

rockinrobin
07-06-2010, 07:14 PM
No hype here either. No diets to go on and off. No stopping and starting - just continuing on. Creating a new normal for yourself (& family). As corny as it sounds - if you want it off once and for all and permanently - it's got to be a lifestyle change.

Just good wholesome foods.. As close to nature as possible. Count calories - making them good ones, wanting to get the very most for my calorie buck - well that took care of all of the percentages.

Wanting to speed up the weight loss? Well, that's why I stayed on plan - day after day after day - holidays, birthdays, stress, happiness, anger, joy, boredom, yada, yada. You stay on plan - the weight comes off in a timelier fashion. Consistency. If time is not an issue for you, then that's another matter. That is a personal matter/decision, but you did mention speed.

Lots of people will say find a plan that you CAN stick to, but I think it's more important to find (devise) a plan that you are WILLING to stick with. Accepting the fact that a change must occur. Rules, boundaries, limitations - there has to be some. There IS a restrictive component to weight loss/maintenance/good health. Not that I feel restricted adhering to a healthy lifestyle (nothing was more restrictive than being overweight), but that it can't be an all out, open ended eat whatever you want food fest.

My biggest suggestion/tip would be to plan ahead. Plan out your food schedule in advance. Know where each and every meal/snack is coming from AHEAD OF TIME. Have it ready. Know it beforehand. Much easier (& wiser) to stay on plan, when you've got one. Don't wing it. Eating well won't happen on it's own. It's got to be planned for.

Know that you have the ability to lose the weight. We are all capable of it. You don't have to be overweight if you don't want to be. It is within your hands. You hold the key. You've got the power.

I also urge you not to dread the changes that have to occur, but embrace them. Look forward to them, get excited. Being slim, trim, active, fit and healthy is a lovely way to be as is adhering to this healthy lifestyle in and of itself.

ncuneo
07-06-2010, 07:25 PM
Gosh I just read a great book that really sums up why to ignore the hype, basically saying that all those fads are just fads and all those "diets" are missing the big picture. It was call The Body Fat Solution by Tom Venuto. I didn't learn anything new, it just confirmed everything I know.

But anyway, no fad, no hype here. Just basic calorie counting. Yes it's taken me 4 years to lose it, but I had a baby and still indulge from time to time (but that is a choice and no a days it's part of my plan so at worst I maintain durning that time). Any diet will work as long as it put you in a calorie deficit. How far you want to go with nurtition and fitness is a whole other topic an up to you. Good luck.

kaplods
07-06-2010, 09:13 PM
Most of the hype is created not by the diet designers, but by people criticising the diets.

For example. Atkins is not a zero carb plan, but it's often criticized on those grounds. Induction level is the lowest carb level and it only lasts two weeks, but the diet is consistently critiques based on the induction level alone (Largely because the plan doesn't tell anyone what their ideal carb level for weight loss is, you're supposed to find it on your own by increasing your carb level by 5g every week until you stop losing, then you back down to the level that allows you to keep losing).

South Beach is often criticised for being the "good carb, good fat" plan, for foods that it "bans," but when you read the book, the authour isn't banning anything. For example, Southn Beach os often criticised for "banning" some foods like potatoes and corn, but if you read the book the author puts those foods on a list that is not entitiled FORBIDDEN FOODS, Never eat or be damned, it's entitled "limit or eat rarely."

People don't like "common sense" they want extreme. And if a plan isn't extreme, they'll often interpret it in the most extreme way possible. "Avoid," and "limit" somehow gets translated into "eat one bite and the diet gods will damn yoy for all eternity.

You avoid the hype, by recognizing it as hype. Realize that progress matters more than perfection and there is no diet "magic." One tiny misstep will not undo (in a single "poof") all the progress you've made. Breaking or bending "rules" will not doom you to diet failure.

I need to follow a low-carb diet, because high carb foods make me ravenously hungry. Even when I control calories, I lose more on 1800 calories of low-carb as I do on 1800 calories of high carb. That doesn't mean low-carb is magic, or that high-carb is the devil's diet. I strongly believe that different people do better on different diets, for both physiological and psychological reasons. There is no best diet, only the best diet for you.

You find it by experimenting. For me a food journal has helped tremendously (I never would have realized that low-carb worked better than high-carb, if I hadn't been able to discover the pattern through my food journals).

I personally love exchange plans, because almost any way of eating can be translated into an exchange plan. Exchange plans are nearly as flexible as straight calorie counting. There are resources that list the exchange counts just as there are calorie counting resources. Virtually all exchange plans are still based on the first exchange system that was developed for diabetics in the 1950's. As a result, most exchange plan cookbooks can be used on most exchange plans (the number of exchanges may vary from plan to plan, but what constitues a protein exchange or a dairy exchange, for example hasn't changed, so you can even use old cookbooks).

All I did to make my plan low-carb was to swap out some of the bread/starch exchanges for protein. I can swap back any time I want. If I decide I want a plan that includes more fruit and less of something else, that's fine too.

Remember that you're in control. Anything you don't agree with, you can change (at least as an experiment). For example when I was following South Beach, even though sweet corn, watermelon, and pineapple were on the "limit or avoid" lists, I didn't limit or avoid them. I avoided most corn (especially corn as a grain), but not summer sweet corn on the cob. I avoided canned pineapple, but not fresh. I didn't avoid watermelon either).

When I stopped losing on South Beach, I did try being more respectful of the avoid lists. Even when I stuck to the diet more stringently, I found it hard to lose weight, because it's so easy for me to overeat even the healthiest foods. So I went back to exchange planning, and tried to make most of my choices using South Beach principles. Trying to choose "whole foods" more often than processed foods.

Now I'm still following an exchange plan of my design, only applying Primal Blueprint philosophy rather than South Beach.

You do not have to pick a WOE and follow it to your goal weight. I've lost my 85 lbs on at least four different plans (and several variations of each plan), and who knows how many by the time I reach goal.

Tweak, tweak, tweak. Always remember that you're in control, and you can follow or design any plan that you choose to. Decide what is most important to you, and then run with it. If it doesn't work - tweak some more.

MissKelly
07-06-2010, 09:20 PM
for me it's simple.....calories in....calories out!



Can't word it any better than what EZ said above.

No hype or mysteries here. I'm just keeping carbs very low & keeping track of calories and cycling them when needed, drink 1/2 my weight in oz for water ...& lots of exercise. I don't "reward" myself with food for a job well done...I'm not a lab rat or a K9, so I find that whole reward thing just silly. I don't take any pills to "boost my metabolism"...although I'll take 1 or 2 Walgreens Caffeine pills before I swim laps in the pool at night to work against the days exhaustion .. I don't take anything for regular exercise or strength training. Just as important for me is sleep...I lose more when I snooze good. When I feel like giving up from frustration...I just keep on chugging along & try to work on my patience a bit...and swat that devil sitting on my shoulder away. You just have to want it badly enough. I'm never really eating or doing anything "just so" on a constant basis...am always changing it up because my body changes what it seems to want to respond to. A lot of playing with things at times...even my exercise.

Please don't upset yourself from not seeing dramatic results so early on. I didn't even really begin to feel or see results until I was 280 from 308...28 lbs lost into it. Not a single friend even noticed a dramatic change in me until I hit exactly 252lbs... 56 lbs lost into it.

Hope you find something that works for you soon.

SarahD140
07-06-2010, 09:24 PM
I've been feeling the same way, and a bit embarrased to ask. I'm afraid that if I add carbs I won't lose. Its not logical... I know. Calories in/Calories out sounds pretty smart. And I bet there is more nutrition in that as oppose to what I'm doing and you may be doing.

rockinrobin
07-06-2010, 10:32 PM
I know it *should* be calories in vs calories out, but for me, it's more. Where my calories come from really, really matters.

I need filling power from my calories. I can't spend 100 calories on a cookie (or similar empty calorie food), than I'd want MORE cookies and go *off* my *diet* because I've blown my calorie budget.

Even if by some miracle that I could keep it to one cookie (which decades of *dieting* tells me I can't), I won't be satiated by those 100 calories. I'll feel as if I haven't eaten. I'll be hungry. And if I'm hungry, I am not going to stick with it, I don't stick with it, I don't lose weight.

jendiet
07-06-2010, 11:21 PM
oh thank you. I read all your replies. Thank you for orienting me to real world diet/lifestyle plans. Yeah I agree with alot of you. 80 calories of cookie DOES not do for me what 80 calories of chicken does for me, or even what ONE egg does for me.

I guess I really got overwhelmed by my sibling's amazing weight loss--and she is so strict--i couldn't do it. When I lost weight before I was so strict--i couldn't do it again! I REALLY, REALLY want it to be sensible eating AND watching the amount is the KEY.

not crazy exercise schedules and FORBIDDEN foods. The minute a food is "forbidden" i lust after it even if I really don't care for it!

so yeah, the exchange plan is a more easy going form of calorie counting for me...ok, i'm sticking to this. NO FOODS are forbidden. I drink more water, and I do take a green tea pill to help with the afternoon loll or right before exercise. Thanks everyone for the reply.

I KNOW it's calories in vs. out...BUT i needed some reassurance because I surfed myself to death this afternoon.

koceank29
07-07-2010, 12:24 AM
I know it *should* be calories in vs calories out, but for me, it's more. Where my calories come from really, really matters.

I need filling power from my calories. I can't spend 100 calories on a cookie (or similar empty calorie food), than I'd want MORE cookies and go *off* my *diet* because I've blown my calorie budget.

Even if by some miracle that I could keep it to one cookie (which decades of *dieting* tells me I can't), I won't be satiated by those 100 calories. I'll feel as if I haven't eaten. I'll be hungry. And if I'm hungry, I am not going to stick with it, I don't stick with it, I don't lose weight.

Yep..it should work like people say, but I can eat 1800 cal with carbs and not drop a lb, or 2000 cal with no carbs and lose weight, so there is more to it.

I think you answered your own question...forget the hype. Stick to the basics of eating and your set. Proteins, veggies, some fruit, nuts, clean oils and your good. Stay away from the processed foods.

o0o
07-07-2010, 12:43 AM
You're killin' me kid!

Hugs....

for me it's simple.....calories in....calories out!

I blow it all the time as you well know but bottom line...for me...if I spend more calories than I take in I lose weight.

Be good!
Yup. :)

Natalia
07-07-2010, 02:01 AM
Here's the scoop, as I see it ;)

For some of us, it is a calories in vs calories out scenario. Expend more energy than you take in- lose weight.

For others, the above does not work. Or, it may work but only on an insanely low number of calories. For these people, they must watch their carbs to lose weight. There is no magic number; each person is different. How low we need to go in our carb intake probably has to do with genetics, carb sensitivity.. and maybe a metabolic syndrome that emerged with time and a high carb diet. These are the same factors that probably differentiate people who need to low-carb vs people who can just calorie count.

I can understand why it's hard for some people to believe this because if calories in vs calories out were my reality, I'm not sure I would be able to say that for some people it just doesn't work like that.

However, for youself, why not do the calorie thing first? The odds are that you will be able to lose weight this way, and not have to "resort" to low-carbing if you'd prefer not to. Then, once you give that a fighting chance, you can see from your results if any additional changes are required.

All the best to you and GL with whatever plan you decide :)

rockinrobin
07-07-2010, 08:02 AM
not crazy exercise schedules and FORBIDDEN foods. The minute a food is "forbidden" i lust after it even if I really don't care for it!
.

We were just talking about this specific topic at the 100 lb club yesterday. If you have a chance take a look at it. I was the one who personally brought up this line that you just mentioned. And I still don't understand it, but of course I don't have to understand it. Perhaps it may be a whole other ball game for those who have gotten to the point of having to lose 100+ lbs. :shrug:

Whatever the case, I hope you find a plan that you are willing to stick indefinitely to take you to your goals when you want to get there. :)

Here's the link:
http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/100-lb-club/206354-conversation-yourself-your-head.html

koceank29
07-07-2010, 08:34 AM
We were just talking about this specific topic at the 100 lb club yesterday. If you have a chance take a look at it. I was the one who personally brought up this line that you just mentioned. And I still don't understand it, but of course I don't have to understand it. Perhaps it may be a whole other ball game for those who have gotten to the point of having to lose 100+ lbs. :shrug:

Whatever the case, I hope you find a plan that you are willing to stick indefinitely to take you to your goals when you want to get there. :)

Here's the link:
http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/100-lb-club/206354-conversation-yourself-your-head.html

What a great link rockin robin, so many intelligent thoughts over there putting things in perspective. Thanks!

Losing It 2010
07-07-2010, 08:43 AM
When my youngest was born a friend looked at me and said there is no secret to parenting just whatever works for you and the child (well for me per se more than the child) anyhow that is how I approach this part of my life also whatever works and when it stops workiing try something new. I don't pay one lick of attention to the ads, articles or promotions but I do file it away as useful information.

Whatever works, works for me

Ok, this usually happens after i've been back on plan 2 weeks or so...have seen a little bit of weight loss, but not dramatic results. I get caught up in the HYPE

the sugar burner vs. fat burner
only eat high protein and NO CARBS
eat good fats and NO BAD fats
if you do this it will speed up your weight loss....
best exercise for weight loss is THIS not THAT!

I took some before pics for this go round, and it always makes me feel so insecure and like I want to hurry up and get the process over with...AND i start thinking, what can I do this time, to not get derailed during a plateau or such...

and then I feel bombarded with HYPE...

please just share with me, you weight lossers with the BASIC regimine of eating healthier and exercising more...how you lost your weight and how this BASIC formula is keeping you from gaining it back!

kaplods
07-09-2010, 06:52 PM
"Calories in, calories out," is true for everyone - just not in the way most people mean it.

Calories in, calories out is often misinterpreted to mean that a person will always lose the same amount of weight on a consistent number of calories, regardless of where the calories come from (Snickers bars or lettuce). I do not lose the same amount of weight on 1800 calories of high-carb eating as 1800 calories of low carb eating. I lose better on low-carb, which doesn't prove that calories in, calories out doesn't apply. It only means that carbohydrate content is affecting the equation in some way (it may be the calories in or the calories out part of the equation).

Often, people saying "calories in, calories out," are making assumptions about the equation. One being that calories in can be entirely and precisely controlled, and also that calories out is a constant or can also be precisely controlled. Those assumptions are flawed. You can't decide, for example to maintain your body temperature at a constant 98.6. If your body temperature drops because of what you're eating, you can't "choose" to elevate it back to 98.6.

I don't know all of the reasons that I lose more on 1800 calories of low-carb, than on 1800 calories of high-carb foods, but I do understand some and have suspicions about others. All of them can be applied to calories, in calories out - but I will ever be able to control the calories out part of the equation as well as I can control the calories in.

For one, my body temperature is actually higher on a low-carb diet. It's weird, and I never would have guessed, except that body temperature was one of the things I monitored in my health journal for a while (at my doctor's suggestion - to monitor my temperature, that is, not that it could be affected by my diet). Making the connection between body temp and diet was actually accidental.

My "normal" body temperature is far under 98.6. Usually 96.8, but often it fell under 96 degrees. My average body temp has gone up almost one whole degree.

Then there's fatigue. When I eat low-carb (as long as I don't reduce carbs to Atkins induction level, that causes severe fatigue), I have more energy on fewer calories. When I eat high-carb, I have more pain issues and I fatigue more easily. I'm also hungrier and more food-obsessed. Just the lack in energy means that I burn less.

On high-carb and junk foods, my sleep is affected (also learned through my health journal). When I eat lower-carb, I sleep better, longer, and probably deeper (I remember fewer dreams, and my neurologist says that is actually a sign of deeper sleep). I can't really "choose" how long or how deep I sleep (I'm on disability, so I don't use an alarm clock. I wake up, when I wake up).

Even the calories in part of the equation isn't as static as people often assume. Foods and other variables can affect how completely you digest your food. Although calorie counters count all of the calories in food, not all of those calories are digested. This is why birds and many other animals eat poop or eat things out of the poop - either their own or that of other animals.
Corn and seeds are a perfect (if gross) example. They can leave the body fully or partially intact, and then (if it is available to them) other animals will eat the poo or the corn/seeds out of the poo.

Cats don't digest their food very well, which is why dogs will often eat cat poo - the poo is still full of meat (We learned that icky fact when we had a dog that considered cat poo quite the delicacy).

So who gets the calories, the animal that ate the corn the first time, or the critter that ate it from the poo? One may have gotten most or all of the calories, or they may have split the difference in some way. Your calorie counting book can't tell you how many of the calories you are keeping (digesting) and how much is leaving your body undigested. It's a "worst case scenario" at best.

That doesn't mean calorie counting isn't useful. Or that calories in, calories out is not true. It just means that the equation has hidden variables that we can't know. It doesn't mean that it's "anybody's guess," there are factors that we can discover through experience. An educated guess is possible with enough experimentation.

It's just really important to realize that there are unknown variables in the equation, and that we all aren't operating with the same equation.


Calories in, calories out can be useful, even for low-carb dieters. It's helpful to know that you cannot gain 5 lbs of fat from a 2 ounce candybar (in fact, you can't gain more than 2 ounces - that would violate the laws of physics).

It's helpful to know that exercise burns calories and builds muscle. Muscle burns more calories than fat, so we know that exercise can change the "calories out" part of the equation. Eating too little protein can prevent muscle growth and repair (thus limiting the calorie out boost you could achieve from exercise).

jendiet
07-09-2010, 07:30 PM
kaplods, that is very insightful, and I am intrigued by your body temperature going up which ulitmately means your metabolism is going up. Body temp is a good indication of thyroid function.

I think I have found my mojo with the exchange system--i'm not uber obsessed about every bite like with calorie counting, and I know pretty much how many calories each exchange has...so i am pretty sure I am taking in a good amount of calories for me--plus with the changing of the exchanges i am unwittingly calorie cycling--which always works for me. I have also been drinking a gallon of water a day. I used to pee alot. I stopped peeing so much. Now I am back to peeing as much as I used to...does that make sense? i'm not sure what is going on there...but I am drinking that water up! if I feel water logged, i eat a pickle or two.

I also carb cycle too. Because there are some days, i substitute starches for milk or meat...i really haven't craved a donut or cake or even a cookie, i crave chocolate and mocha. and i make a smoothie with milk and ice..yum.

i also feel blah on too much junk food/carbs . I have been craving eggs and chicken and good fats.

Thanks for the input everyone, robin, i will have to find that link and read that!

EZMONEY
07-09-2010, 09:14 PM
Unless one has a medical issue with certain foods....

for dieting/diet/nutrional purposes....

is it really more difficult than...

calories in ~ calories out....

exercise.....

eating commen sense amounts of fruits/vegetables/dairy/grains/meats and beans?

kaplods
07-09-2010, 10:47 PM
Regardless of medical issues, weight loss is ALWAYS simply a matter of calories in, calories out. No matter who you are, if you take in more than you need, you will gain weight. If you burn more than you take in, you will lose weight.

It's determining how much you're taking in, and how much you're burning that can complicate the equation (health issues are just one source of complication).

You don't need to understand all of the variables to get started, but if you find that simply cutting calories isn't working the way you expect it to, then you've got to look at the equation more closely. Why isn't the equation working out the way you expect it to?

Initially when I started losing better with low-carb, I assumed that the only reason I was having greater success, was because of the dramatic reduction in hunger/appetite. If that were the only reason, it would have been reason enough. It didn't change the truth of calories in, calories out, it just meant that I was taking in less, because I was less hungry.

When I discovered that I actually lost more weight on low-carb than on high carb even when the calories were the same, that was truly amazing - but it still doesn't change calories in, calories out. It just meant that for some reason when the calories are coming from low-carb sources, something about the equation changed. Maybe, low-carb foods are being digested less efficiently (that is I'm taking in fewer of the calories in the food I'm eating). Or maybe it somehow increases the calories I burn (or some combination of both). I don't know which, and I don't need to know which. I just needed to notice the result and use it. It doesn't change the truth of calories in, calories out.

I'm not convinced that all of these variable differences are a result of specific health issues. Besides which, even of the health issues that doctors agree affect the equation, many (perhaps even most) are difficult or impossible to diagnose.

I know that I have several health issues that are known to suppress metabolism, but calories in, calories out still applies to me. Before, after, or whether I was ever diagnosed, the course of action is the same.

It leaves everyone in the same boat, with the same life raft. You solve your equation by experimentation, and you start with the simplest experiment. If your simple experiment doesn't work, you try something a little more complicated, and you keep experimenting, until you end up with the simplest experiment that is effective.

Portion reduction and/or activity increase is one of the simplest form of the experiment. If it works, it can end there.

If you find it doesn't work, or doesn't work as well as you'd like you have to refine the experiment. Maybe you have to actually have to log and count calories or exchanges or WW points.....

If that doesn't work as well as you'd like, you may have to tweak further...

Ultimately and ideally, you end up with the simplest strategy that works.

EZMONEY
07-10-2010, 01:04 AM
Colleen you are the best!

srmb60
07-10-2010, 06:48 AM
I'm hugely in favour of tweaking as you go! No matter what works for anyone else on the planet ... your successful plan will be yours alone. And it will develope over time.

You, Jendiet, have found something that is working. You don't need to change anything big. If it's working and you are enjoying yourself ... the only thing I recommend (and its more health related than weight wise) is to make sure your food is real. Natural, like it grows.

jendiet
07-10-2010, 12:23 PM
Thanks Susan, I think that is a huge factor. I am very sensitive to processed foods anyways.