Does it Work? - No grains or dairy?




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mom with issues
04-27-2010, 08:01 AM
I was just wondering if anyone else has done this and I didn't know where else to post. Two of my sons and I have been seeing this doctor who uses a holistic approach to medical issues. There are "supplements" involved but are mostly some sort of vitamin.

Anyway, my middle son (12) has always had digestive issues. He would have BM every 3 or 4 days, which obviously isn't right. My older son started. eating healthier just because he plays a lot of sports and wanted to be healthier. I started because doc says if I don't cook this way then my kids won't eat this way and he's right.

Here it is. We started out slowly eliminating bad foods from our diet. Pop, chips, other junk foods. Well, about 3 weeks ago, the 12 year old was still having problem so the doc said absolutely no more grains or dairy. You get the calcium you need from leafy green veggies and we are allowed to drink almond milk which has a lot of calcium in it. It sounds strange, but once you get used to it, it isn't that hard.

Bottom line is that in that time the 12 year old has lost 10 lbs. and now has a BM every day and sometimes twice a day. My 14 year old only lost 2 lbs. but the kid is 5'8" and weighs 128 to begin with so he doesn't need to lose. I've lost 7 lbs. and feel SO much better.

I was just wondering if anyone else has tried this and how it worked for them. Like I said, it sounds weird, but so far, it seems to be really working.
Sorry this post is so long.


nelie
04-27-2010, 10:09 AM
I haven't had dairy for a couple years and there are many people in the world who don't eat dairy so its not unusual. I do eat some grains though.

beerab
04-27-2010, 10:31 AM
Sounds like he may be allergic to wheat/gluten and dairy. It's not uncommon.

Keep it up!


BibBob
04-27-2010, 01:43 PM
I just bumped a thread called "Reasons to avoid grains" in the support forum. Moderator Nelie was a great source of input in that thread.

I have been looking into a myriad of plans before starting this weight loss project because at age 48 it is obvious I need to find a lifestyle that is healthy and gets the weight off of me. Dieting just hasn't worked. I need a more permanent change. Paleo eating lifestyles cut out grains and most dairy and from everything I've read I think I can pull this off.

My 11 year old is a little chubby and I never considered inflicting my diet on her, but hopefully the changes I am about to make will lead her by example. I confess to being a little leery of the process and I will jump ship for something better if I find it, but this sacrifice of grains and most dairy seems to make sense for me and my past experiences.

prepping
04-27-2010, 02:20 PM
It's all a balancing act in my experience. I naturally cut back in grains and dairy because I was focusing on portion sizes, veggies, fruit, and the right amount of protein. Once starting to really look at what I ate and journalizing I found that my weight had to be linked to the fact that the majority of my food was carb and dairy.
I still eat it to an extent now though, just in much smaller portions. 1/4 cup oatmeal for breakfast (with some other stuff of course), 2 crackers with a wedge of laughing cow cheese, 1 cup soy milk in my shake, and 3 oz. of low fat plain yogurt. (Once you get used to the tanginess, it's awesome.)

If it's working for you and your 12 year old, and the both of you still have lots of energy that you're getting from the other foods you're eating, then great! Doesn't even sound like a "diet", but more of a lifestyle. :) Very normal for certain people, like me!

btw, I was amazed at what portion sizes were for carbs though. White rice = 1/4 cup cooked, Pasta = 1/2 cup cooked, 1 small potato (as in, small :|) lol
It's easier to do without and find other yummy nutrient-packed foods to get that 100 calories.

kaplods
04-27-2010, 04:00 PM
I eat some dairy and some grains, but I have demphasized both in my diet. I eat them too often to say I "avoid" them, so I supose "limit" is a better word - but I don't eat dairy or grains every day. I would say I probably eat each about 3 times a week.

My eating philosphy is fairly close to what Barbara Berkeley refers to as "primarian" in her book Refuse to Regain!: 12 Tough Rules to Maintain the Body You've Earned! (the book is about maintaining a weight loss already accomplished, but I think it's a book for every stage of weight loss. I'd recommend it even to folks who haven't started their weight loss yet).

I've read a lot of the ancestor or "paleolithic" diets, and I think there's something there. Grains and dairy are "new" foods to the human race, and I think that many people don't thrive on the neolithic (agrarian) diet, and I think that no one thrives on the modern diet (processed food).

I'm not a purist (yet). Maybe I never will be. My theory is that I should be eating most of my foods from those that my ancestors would recognize and the further I can go back, the better. Going back to grandma is great, but going back to hunter-gatherer is even better.

I should also be trying to emulate the activity level of my ancestors too (I don't do that yet either. I know I probably will never. I don't see myself ever running marathons - but I might surprise myself, I suppose).

BibBob
04-27-2010, 04:48 PM
I'm not a purist (yet). Maybe I never will be. My theory is that I should be eating most of my foods from those that my ancestors would recognize and the further I can go back, the better. Going back to grandma is great, but going back to hunter-gatherer is even better.


You too were an excellent source in the old thread I bumped, so thanks. I too have been immersed in the paleo blog world and the fad-ishness is a bit of a turnoff to me. We ain't cavemen and the available food supply has changed, but I am convinced of the general concepts.

A Christian could point to Adam and Eve's fall from grace being accursed with agriculture and grains... ya know, God's punishments were something like, "women will have pain in birth and man will work the soil." Then God just got sick of the whole mess and brought the flood but told Noah to eat all the animals when the waters subsided. See, the evolution based paleo diet is really the Noah diet for us post flood survivors.

Anyway, the point is the caveman cult clouds the message a little for me, which is really about insulin and how it stores fat, ketones and how they release it, and what foods bring about these biological fuel burning mechanisms. I could care less about the history of the information. I am alive and suffering now, in this modern world. My ancient ancestors would have gobbled down a bag of Hostess donuts every bit as fast as I can.

So, I quoted that paragraph of yours because I hope I never become a paleo purist. The reality of life is that I will enjoy an occasional slice of pizza, but I'm fairly certain that kind of thing can be limited to the rarest of occasions if I continue the education AND see solid healthy results.

I am officially starting on May 1st, btw.

Karen925
05-01-2010, 08:19 PM
Deserving of a bump as I am now researching low carbs & auto immune diseases, especially Crohn's.

srmb60
05-01-2010, 08:31 PM
There's a bunch of us working away at this here
http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/carb-counters/200764-oh-yes-well-primal-may.html

Come and join us.

kaplods
05-01-2010, 09:35 PM
You too were an excellent source in the old thread I bumped, so thanks. I too have been immersed in the paleo blog world and the fad-ishness is a bit of a turnoff to me. We ain't cavemen and the available food supply has changed, but I am convinced of the general concepts.

A Christian could point to Adam and Eve's fall from grace being accursed with agriculture and grains... ya know, God's punishments were something like, "women will have pain in birth and man will work the soil." Then God just got sick of the whole mess and brought the flood but told Noah to eat all the animals when the waters subsided. See, the evolution based paleo diet is really the Noah diet for us post flood survivors.

Anyway, the point is the caveman cult clouds the message a little for me, which is really about insulin and how it stores fat, ketones and how they release it, and what foods bring about these biological fuel burning mechanisms. I could care less about the history of the information. I am alive and suffering now, in this modern world. My ancient ancestors would have gobbled down a bag of Hostess donuts every bit as fast as I can.

So, I quoted that paragraph of yours because I hope I never become a paleo purist. The reality of life is that I will enjoy an occasional slice of pizza, but I'm fairly certain that kind of thing can be limited to the rarest of occasions if I continue the education AND see solid healthy results.

I am officially starting on May 1st, btw.



I have to say that I found the paleo books more useful than the paleo blogs. If you understand the science (or even just research methodology), what you'll find even more helpful (at least I did) are the original research articles that the book authors site.

Scientists are hesitant to overreach their conclusions, so I've found that the less science behind the source, the more likely the material deteriorates into not just pseudo-science and even "magical-thinking."

When it comes to diet (for weight loss and health), I'm extremely wary of the theories that push an agenda of "one tiny mistep and you're doomed." Yes, if you have a severe allergy or severe celiac disease, even a trace of wheat can do serious harm to your body, but I suspect (at least at this point) that our systems aren't that sensitive.

I see the human diet more practically (sort of like zoo keepers do). Zoos do take into account the animals' native diets, but they make adaptations based on the foods they have available to them. Zoos are having to recalculate and update feeding formulas because of the ever-changing food supply (even animals are being affected by the "modernization" of crops).

I think there are things to be learned from nutritional anthropology, but at best we're going to be able to duplicate some aspects of the paleo diet & lifestyle, not perfectly replicate it (and hopefully we'll pick the variables that matter). To be sure, they'll all need to be tested to see if they produce the hoped-for results. This is where I think the magical-thinking comes in. What do we need to duplicate? How closely do we have to duplicate? For aspects of the diet and lifestyle that we can't or won't duplicate (such as insect-eating in the USA) how do we imitate or substitute for what we're missing (if we find that the missing part matters). For example some paleo plans recommend some dairy, because we're not eating insects and bones for calcium.

At this point, the theories are interesting, but all mostly untested.

I have faith that future generations will eventually figure all this stuff out (if as a culture, we remain committed to scientific inquiry). However, that doesn't help us here and now all that much. We don't have the answers that still have to be asked.

For now, I'm stuck trying to be both scientist AND lab rat. It's not the ideal situation. I feel like Frankenstein (or more accurately, I suppose Dr. Jekyl as I'm experimenting on myself). I can't do double-blind studies on myself, so my experiments are of limited use to anyone but me (and even of limited use TO me). It's bad science. I'm just guessing here, and I can't rule out bias effects. At best the results are valid only to me, and at worst I may be engaging in superstitious behavior, because I "think" I have reached valid conclusions for my sample of one.

BibBob
05-01-2010, 11:45 PM
Great post Kap. I have been pouring through the cited information, but it's hard for me -- a little out of my league. I'm reading GCBC. And I am now trying this lifestyle. The first day was fine.

kaplods
05-02-2010, 12:30 AM
Yeah, it's out of my league too. I took research methodology classes, but that was 15 years ago. I never worked in research (in fact, I opted out of thesis so I wouldn't have to), and since I never planned to work in research, I payed only as much attention as I had to. Which means I have just enough knowledge to THINK I know something (as they say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing).

Still, it's amazing what I have experienced already, like the drastic improvement in my autoimmune symtoms when I drastically reduced grain intake. It's hard for me to disbelieve the theory in light of my personal evidence (though I know one person's experience isn't enough to "prove" anything, it sure seems to prove something to me). That I had a mild partial relapse around the holidays (when I ate quite a few of my mother's homemade grain and sugar goodies), sure makes it seem even less likely that I'm mistaken, though I can't discount the possibility of bias errors. Maybe it's just placebo effect (though with everything I've tried, it seems unlikely that placebo effect would only NOW kick in).

I'm now at the point where I'm feeling I understand just enough to feel there are books I want to buy and keep for reference. Today I received the book The Low-Carb Bible by Elizabeth Ward (it's a book I've been recommending ever since I first checked it out of my local library. I've checked it out a couple times since, and finally decided I needed to buy it. The book compares and reviews 9 low-carb plans: Atkins, Carbohydrate Addicts, Neanderthin, Protein Power, Schwarzbein Principle, South Beach, Sugar Busters, Suzanne Somers, and the Zone).

I'd love to own NeanderThin, but not at the prices I've been able to find it ($45 to $99).

I've heard such good things about Primal Blueprint that I've put it at the top of my "too buy" list, even though I haven't read it (usually I borrow a book from the library before even considering buying it, but I just got word yesterday that I wouldn't be able to get it through Interlibrary loan because it was "too popular." When I described the book, our librarian offered to put it on their "purchase list" and me at the top of the wait list (which is great, and I agreed, but I'm thinking I'll probably be buying it before the library gets it in and checked into the system).

You know, I've put a lot more effort into studying nutrition and weight loss than I did in my chosen field (master's degree in developmental psychology). With all the information, you'd think I would have mastered this by now. (I've been dieting more often than not since I was 5 years old - and it turns out the only diet I never seriously considered is the only one that I've ever had success with, and hunger-control, and that's low-carb).

I've thought of it as "unhealthy" for so long, that I still have a hard time wrapping my head around this. Old habits and sterotypes die hard (especially when you thought they were based on hard, tangible science). Eating more fat and having all my blood lipid profiles improving doesn't seem possible to me (though my doctor says we can't argue with the results. Even though the weight is coming off slowly, my bloodwork has been improving much more consistently).

Sorry, I'm starting to ramble on and on. I tend to overanalyze things instead of just jumping in to trial and error. With funded research that would be a good thing, but when dealing with my own experiment of one, I think I overthink things before I commit to action.

mom with issues
05-02-2010, 06:58 PM
Wow. I really appreciate all of the info. My family and I don't feel like we're doing a diet as much as we are changing our lifestyle (although sometimes it is hard). I have lost 10 pounds in the last 3 weeks so I'm happy. The reason we avoid grains is that doc says that the soil has been harmed by all of the chemical pestisides used, which makes sense to me. We are allowed 2 "cheat meals" a week, but have usually chosen not to take them. Like I said, sometimes it's hard, but I know that I CAN have these things I crave (sweets, junk food, etc.) but I CHOOSE not to. That sort of makes it easier. I have also found almond milk which is not dairy, but is very good. We use that to make fruit smoothies which is a great substitute for ice cream in the evening.

Anyway, we're still working it and it seems to be working for us. So, I guess that's reason enough to stay with it for now. We'll see how long I can go before I break down. Ha ha. But, seriously, thanks to all who have given so much info. It truly helps understand and live with the changes.

LandonsBaby
05-02-2010, 10:28 PM
I've had several chiropractors/holistic doctors tell me to give up grains. My current chiro wants me to give up all carb type foods for three months. Nothing but meat, nuts, eggs, vegetables and butter. No fruit, beans, potatoes, etc. But with having morning sickness I can really do it right now and he understands. It would be nice if my second trimester brings less nausea and I can try to ease into the diet but it may have to wait.

nelie
05-03-2010, 11:00 AM
Landons - Have you asked your obstetrician/midwife about that? I mean I think we experiment with our bodies and generally don't have long term effects from short term experiments but being pregnant brings something else into the mix. The diet of of 'meat, nuts, eggs, vegetables and butter' sounds like something a pregnant mother shouldn't be following. And do you have restrictions on the vegetables?

kaplods
05-03-2010, 11:12 AM
Landons - Have you asked your obstetrician/midwife about that? I mean I think we experiment with our bodies and generally don't have long term effects from short term experiments but being pregnant brings something else into the mix. The diet of of 'meat, nuts, eggs, vegetables and butter' sounds like something a pregnant mother shouldn't be following. And do you have restrictions on the vegetables?

During pregnancy, you especially need folic acid. Most ob's prescribe a prenatal vitamin simply because because even a mild folate deficiency can cause so many severe birth defects (spina bifida and other brain/spine/nerve problems, especially). Folates are common in grains, fruits, and leafy greans. How much is enough, can be difficult to determine so I urge you to talk to your doctor immediately about getting you on a prenatal vitamin if you aren't already (the most severe birth defects are caused in the earliest months of pregnancy).

koceank29
05-03-2010, 01:50 PM
I've had several chiropractors/holistic doctors tell me to give up grains. My current chiro wants me to give up all carb type foods for three months. Nothing but meat, nuts, eggs, vegetables and butter. No fruit, beans, potatoes, etc. But with having morning sickness I can really do it right now and he understands. It would be nice if my second trimester brings less nausea and I can try to ease into the diet but it may have to wait.

Here is a link you may be interested in, of course it says consult with your dr. but there is valuable info. on pregnancy and grains.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/pregnant-diet/

kaplods
05-03-2010, 07:08 PM
I like the way he describes eating lots of vegetables "wreckless amounts of vegetables."

mom with issues
05-04-2010, 08:23 AM
Kaplods,
I was just re-reading (and absorbing) what you said earlier. I also think that this whole idea is very individual. Like I said we are allowed 2 "cheat meals" so obviously a slice of pizza or piece of bread won't kill us. So far, we have opted not to do the cheat meal because everything is working so wel for us right now. As I said "for us". I don't mean to even suggest to anyone else that this is the way to go.

Obviously my 12 year old has issues with either grains or dairy, since he has much improved since we started this. He is the most adamant about not doing the cheat meals. This had gone so far that when we go to my father in laws house on Sunday for dinner (he usually cooks spaghetti) we have been taking our own chicken, vegetable, and fruit to eat. I told both of my boys that this is their option and they have chosen to do this. We also don't eat the cake and ice cream, we just stay in another room.

We are allowed all the veggies that we want. We are allowed sweet potatoes, but not white potatoes, go figure, but it makes me happy cuz I LOVE sweet potatoes. We are also allowed to eat all the fruit we want but we are supposed to try to keep the veggies to fruit at a 2 to 1 ratio. We also try to consider the glycemic index when choosing. We are allowed chicken, turkey and beef but no pork and avoid processed food. Like I said, it works for us and I have lost weight without exercise, which I have never done before. This week I am adding walking to me schedule and I can't wait to see the results after that.

I am very grateful for all the information you had to offer. It has truly helped me to look at what we are doing and decide to keep going, at least for now. I also am very interested in the books you talked about and are going to check with my local library on them. As I said, thanks for all the "food for thought" so to speak.

mom with issues
05-04-2010, 08:30 AM
By the way, LandonsBaby, I would be very careful about your diet since you are pregnant. Talk with your doctor. Maybe cutting back on certain things is okay, but I think that pregnant women need a more balanced diet and I think fruit is important. I don't know - I could be wrong but please talk to your OB befoe you make any drastic changes. I also hope the morning sickness goes away. I was pregnant 3 times and was fortunate enought to never be sick, but I understand that it sucks.

Shortymac
07-18-2010, 04:15 PM
I'm on a similar diet for my digestive issues, you can make your own yogurt with no lactose in it. You have to ferment it for 24 hours though. Chedder cheese has almost none either.

Also, for pregnancy that sounds extreme... At least add some fruit and cheese to it!

Ps. Get breaking the vicious cycle and cookbooks on scd diet, it's very similar and has great recipes!

K8-EEE
07-20-2010, 12:42 PM
Honestly I had great results on a grain and dairy free regime, but since I found it impossible to stick to despite the benefits I can't say that it really was an answer for me. I do think it's a good way to go if it doesn't bother you. My problem is I live with people who don't need to diet so I've found very restrictive regimes backfire on my because I end up resenting all the skinny people eating normal food around me and end up over-eating. I will say that I am more aware of limiting/moderating the grains and no longer have cereal for breakfast or popcorn at the movie, and that kind of thing.

SilverLife
08-01-2010, 06:08 PM
I have found Dr. Kurt Harris' blog, PaNu, excellent. He explains how and why gluten causes problems. For many people, it's not just grains with gluten, but all grains which are problematic. Sugar/fructose/artificial sweeteners/honey, etc, and grains are the main culprits in many ailments and in very serious diseases. For some people, after they've not eaten grains for a while, they find that they can eat butter, heavy cream, yogurt, and other fermented dairy products, even if they cannot eat milk, or even cheese.

Here is the Get Started (http://www.paleonu.com/get-started/) page at his blog.

Some of the scientific explanations are beyond my comprehension, but he makes good sense and cares very much about helping people be healthy, and in preventing serious diseases and helping those who have them, to recover.

Hope this is of some help.

honeythorn
08-01-2010, 07:05 PM
I'm curious as to why honey would be banned on a paleo type diet. Our ancestors would have eaten that. Plenty of tribes still do even now. And why ban fruit? They would have eaten that as well when it was in season.

kaplods
08-01-2010, 11:52 PM
I'm curious as to why honey would be banned on a paleo type diet. Our ancestors would have eaten that. Plenty of tribes still do even now. And why ban fruit? They would have eaten that as well when it was in season.

It's important not to look at only what our ancestors would have eaten, but how often they would have eaten each.

Both honey and fruit were part of a paleo diet, and are part of modern hunter/gatherer societies today, but then and now, both would be an extremely small part of the diet. The quantities and freqency of high-carb sweet treats like fruit and honey would have been fairly rare. To imitate the carb,protein,fiber, fat ratios of paleo life, you've got to be fairly limiting on even "primal" sources of carbs.

Honey is not something they'd have daily or even monthly access to. It would be a fairly uncommon treat.

Fruit would be more common (at least during some parts of the year), but modern fruit is a lot different than paleo fruits that would have been available. In a "natural" world, fruits almost never get the chance to reach the sweetness of modern fruits. One reason is that we've bred modern fruits to be far larger and sweeter than their natural/primal counterparts. Secondly, even paleo low-sugar fruits would never reach the peak of ripeness (and sugar content), because there was too much competition (from other humans and every other fruit-eating critter in the area).

I don't consider fruits or honey off-limits, but I do try to remember that these were "treats" not mainstays of the paleo diet (and they were foods that took a fair amount of effort to harvest). Low-sugar fruits would have been much more common (eating them as soon as they were palatable, to get them before the other critters found them).

I also try to keep in mind the amount of effort that foods would have required to harvest, and how much competition there was for it. The most nutritionally dense foods (high sugar fruits, high protein/fat meats....) were the most difficult to harvest, or the least available. You can't pick a bunny off a bush, you've got to chase it down. Sweet fruit is only going to be available for a short period, and you're going to have to beat the competition (be faster, smarter, or stronger).

The food that was the easiest to gather, and the most common would also be the least calorie dense. High fiber, low calorie plants and plenty of insects. Insects are a great source of protein, but not particularly palatable (or safe in most areas). I'm not going to be eating insects, so compromises are in order.

Most meats would be fairly lean, and the leanest ones would be the easiest to catch.

To some degree we have to make up for the fact that our plant foods (vegetables) are much higher in calorie and much lower in fiber than paleo/natural options, our fruits are much higher in sugar, and much lower in fiber, we're missing out on the nutrition provided by insects, and that we're not having to work hard in order to eat and avoid being eaten.

There's only so much we can do to imitate the paleo lifestyle, and "how close" is probably somewhat individual. You're still left with experimentation being your best tool.

SilverLife
08-02-2010, 05:48 AM
Honeythorn, are you asking about the diet at PaNu (http://www.paleonu.com/)? If so, Dr. Harris explains how sucrose, glucose, lactose, fructose, etc. are digested, metabolized, and gives very thorough explanations.

His diet is not based on the emotional attachment to keeping what folks might or might not have eaten tens of thousands of years ago, but on what is sound science, keeping our genetic and digestive history in mind. Much of what he recommends is similar to those who follow the "Paleo" diet, but his reference to it is often tongue-in-cheek.

Dr. Harris' premise makes a great deal of sense.

If you are interested in this area of nutrition, please do make sure you follow a plan that has a very sound basis, with excellent resource material, and is not based on conjecture. This particular post (http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/2009/11/27/health-and-evolutionary-reasoning-the-panu-method.html), by Dr. Harris, on health and evolutionary reasoning, might be of some help. (Just ignore the silly photo at the beginning of the page.)

Wishing you all the best! :)

kaplods
08-02-2010, 05:21 PM
Great article. I think it really clarifies that it's the metabolism of early man that we're trying to duplicate, not every aspect of the paleolithic lifestyle. I like how he phrases it as trying to "manipulating the genes I am stuck with after a billion years of evolution."

The more you know about human physiology and biology, the better you become at knowing which foods will suit your purposes. The more you can recognize the foods that work with your metabolism, and which work against it.

It's primarily the sugar/starch and the "anti-nutrients" in grains (such as gluten) that paleo-diets are trying to address. It's an oversimplification to create a list of "ok" and "not ok" foods - but that's how people expect to get their diet information "Tell me what I can eat, and what I can't." If only it were that simple.

Simplification is important, we need to simplify information to assimilate it - but oversimplify and meaning is lost.

Overindulging in honey and fruit is a problem because of it's effects on the body, not because it was scarce to paleo man. Paleo man didn't have to deal with the problem, because of the scarcity of sugar in his environment.

It's important to remember that it's the foods' effects on the body, not their role in a historical diet, that really is the issue here. Using the paleo-model is just a convenient way of looking at the information.

The problem with convenient models is that the simplification can easily become oversimplification.

mom with issues
08-06-2010, 01:37 AM
I'm back. Here's an update for anyone who is interested. Since we started this new way of eating in late April, my son has lost about 25 lbs. He needed to lose some weight. He was kind of chunky (but not fat) before. Now he looks wonderful. He is about 5'6" and weighed about 140. Now he weighs about 115, give or take a few. I compare how he looks now to his school picture last year and I can't believe the difference. As of today, I have lost 35 lbs. Not to mention we both did this without exercise. I walk some and do quite a bit of gardening, but haven't had to step on a treadmill or jump on an exercise bike.
We are now basically following an Atkins like plan. We eat meat, a LOT of veggies, and some fruit. We pretty much avoid grains and dairy. We are supposed to stay away from the fruit with a lot of sugar, like melons, but it's summer and I like to take advantage of the fruit that is available now. I have all winter to eat apples and oranges. Blah.
We try to stick with this as much as possible, but nobody is perfect. We cheat some. We were on vacation a couple of weeks ago and we went to visit friends. We ate pizza and some chips, but we tried our best to balance it out with good food.
What really got me was that my oldest son, who is eating as we are, but surely doesn't need to lose weight (5'9" and 115) went to soccer camp a couple of weeks ago. We don't have any junk food or soda in the house. That, of course, make it really difficult when we have friends. All you can offer them is water, fruit or veggies. People tend to not get too excited lol.
Anyway, at soccer camp, they had to eat the food they were served. As you can imagine, the meals were pizza, hot dogs, cereal, etc. I should mention that there were several kids on the soccer team whose families eat the way we do. My son and all the other kids like him had stomach cramps all weekend they were at camp. What a shock.
Anyway, I haven't read any of the books that were mentioned (although I would like to) but it sure seem like it's working for us. I have also found that the more weight I lose, the more I want to keep eating this way. When I'm sitting around by the pool and I want that beer or two, losing weight keeps me motivated to abstain. It's working for us and I love it.