Whole Foods Lifestyle - Almond Milk vs Soy Milk




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festivus
05-06-2009, 03:53 PM
What do you guys think? I personally prefer the flavor of almond milk, although I never drink any type of milk straight (my husband does though). Almond is more expensive than soy and has quite a bit more fat.

I primarily use it for my protein shakes in the morning and if any recipe calls for milk.

Which do you think provides more health benefits?


partypantalones
05-06-2009, 04:21 PM
ah ive long wondered this myself! im on WW and a full cup of unsweetened vanilla almond breeze is only one WW point... which is fantastic.

also i know in recent years some doubts have been cast on the presumptive healthiness of soy products??

so yeah! ha i dunno, but looking forward to an answer. :p

K8-EEE
05-06-2009, 04:31 PM
absolutely almond milk!!! It doesn't have that weird after taste. I love almond milk and frozen blueberry smoothies.


K8-EEE
05-06-2009, 04:32 PM
Almond milk rocks on the Vitamin E too...I just could never get into the way soy milk tastes. I like hemp milk though.

LindaT
05-06-2009, 04:33 PM
Almond milk.. love that I can sweeten the stuff with any flaver surgar free syrup I want.

Fressca
05-06-2009, 05:35 PM
I don't like soy milk, but I *love* almond milk. Almond milk on cereal, and especially pumpkin flax granola... mmm!

nelie
05-06-2009, 06:16 PM
I use all of the above including rice milk and hemp milk. At a potluck I went to, someone even made oat milk (which seems quite easy) and walnut milk (again easy).

Wolf Goddess
05-07-2009, 02:32 AM
I usually buy a bulk case of vanilla soymilk at Costco. Almond milk intrigues me, but is difficult to locate in my area.

ICUwishing
05-11-2009, 05:06 PM
I was just browsing my local Whole Foods and discovered hazelnut milk - will have to read the label and see what they're doing to it! I try to avoid the soy milk and basically any soy products that haven't been around for the last hundred (to a thousand!) years. Our family is trying very hard to make the move to whole foods, but wow! I love all the nut milks, and have tried oat and hemp milk too. :) It's a juggling act - aside from coconuts, I don't know of any of these "milks" that's not going through some major factory action to create them. If anybody knows ... please pass it on!

nelie
05-11-2009, 05:08 PM
Have you thought about making your own milk? You can make your own {rice, soy, hemp, almond, oat, etc} milk fairly easily.

Personally, I accept nut milks as a whole foods item. I've made my own in the past but I prefer the ease of buying.

digitalrequiem
05-11-2009, 05:13 PM
I prefer almond milk because it doesn't have the powdery texture that I get from soy milks. Also, I really like the slight nuttiness that it adds to my morning cereal and coffee..yum!

JulieJ08
05-11-2009, 06:05 PM
I don't think strictly speaking (or really, not all that strictly) you can call soy, nut or grain milks wholefoods. Same for oils. In fact, you're not eating wholefoods if you only have the broccoli florets and not the stalk, or when you eat an orange and not the peel (I've only recently learned that some people eat the peel!). Also soy sauce, and I'm sure so many other things.

Personally, I would eat all those things. But the point is, everyone has to draw their own line, because it's not as black and white as it may seem.

On the other hand, non-dairy milks and oils, even once accepted as a category as being wholefoods or close enough, may be fairly processed with the milks having a lot of additives and the oils having chemical processing. You just have to choose carefully.

Hyacinth
05-11-2009, 11:51 PM
I prefer almond milk over soy milk. I like soy yogurt, though.

ICUwishing
05-13-2009, 03:08 PM
It's probably been debated already, and I have not gone back through this forum's threads yet (sorry!), but does anything that's been pasteurized fit this template? If so, what about irradiation? Both are man-made attempts to improve on nature ... and I'd argue that both fail ... but that's a "whole" different thread. :)

JulieJ08
05-13-2009, 03:27 PM
It's probably been debated already, and I have not gone back through this forum's threads yet (sorry!), but does anything that's been pasteurized fit this template? If so, what about irradiation? Both are man-made attempts to improve on nature ... and I'd argue that both fail ... but that's a "whole" different thread. :)

Many people would most definitely consider pasteurization (and homogenization) to be processing. They only consider raw milk to be fit for consumption. I'm still sorting it out, but it's food for thought.

shananigans
05-13-2009, 03:36 PM
Many people would most definitely consider pasteurization (and homogenization) to be processing. They only consider raw milk to be fit for consumption. I'm still sorting it out, but it's food for thought.

If these people are so worried about being natural why are they drinking the milk of another species, and why are they drinking milk past weaning age? So not natural. People are so weird. :rolleyes:

JulieJ08
05-13-2009, 03:57 PM
If these people are so worried about being natural why are they drinking the milk of another species, and why are they drinking milk past weaning age? So not natural. People are so weird. :rolleyes:

Not that I don't agree with you about milk being a weird thing to eat, but I also find it weird to eat a dead animal's muscles. But wholefoods is about avoiding processing, not about which unprocessed foods are fit for consumption.

Thighs Be Gone
05-13-2009, 04:11 PM
Not that I don't agree with you about milk being a weird thing to eat, but I also find it weird to eat a dead animal's muscles. .


I am thinking this more and more these days. I am almost all "Pecetarian" (sp?) but eat a tadbit of chicken from time to time. I agree about the cows milk though. I have switched my children to a new pediatrician who discourages cows milk consumption for children. It is completely upside down compared to what I was told growing up.

shananigans
05-13-2009, 04:11 PM
Not that I don't agree with you about milk being a weird thing to eat, but I also find it weird to eat a dead animal's muscles. But wholefoods is about avoiding processing, not about which unprocessed foods are fit for consumption.

Yeah, I don't really get raw foodists at all. I know it's good to eat a lot of raw fruits and vegetables, some nutrients are more available in foods in their raw form. But some nutrients are more available when food is cooked. And some animal "foods" like meat and dairy can be downright dangerous in raw form. I don't know where they got the idea that raw = good when it comes to animal products. Are they trying to get salmonellosis?

ETA: sorry this got so off topic! For the record, I like almond and soy milk, and most all nut and grain milks I've tried.

ETA (again): Whenever this topic comes up I can't help myself from sharing this little cartoon, because really, how ridiculous!?

http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g106/LA_shananigans/cow.gif

Thighs Be Gone
05-13-2009, 04:18 PM
But some nutrients are more available when food is cooked.
.


Yes, I never knew this until recently. This is discussed in Superfoods Rx. I read this about carrots as well as canned pumpkin--that are both on the superfoods list.

I am still reading about other foods that increase nutritionally outside of their raw form-and I still haven't finished the book. I am taking it slowly and there is a BUNCH of information there to get through. Very surprising on the cooked food thing... Do you know of other foods that do this as well?

JulieJ08
05-13-2009, 04:27 PM
Very surprising on the cooked food thing... Do you know of other foods that do this as well?

I don't think this is actually very new knowledge. I think it applies to dark, leafy greens too. I try to get plenty of raw and cooked veggies every day. I'm eating so many veggies in total, that it's easy to get cooked and uncooked stuff in. The idea with raw is that cooking kills beneficial enzymes. I don't know if I really agree with this, but it's an interesting idea. And it makes intuitive sense to me that both raw and cooked veggies have their advantages.

What has been so interesting to me is that cooking, and also grinding into a flour, changes things like glycemic load. I guess that's why my soaked but uncooked muesli is keeping me full so much better than the oatmeal I used to eat. And why brown rice is so much more filling for me (and takes longer to eat the same calories!) than whole wheat bread. Even pasta al dente has a lower GL than overcooked pasta.

Oops, a bit off topic :o

Anyway, I'm always excited to have activity in the whole foods forum!

shananigans
05-13-2009, 04:40 PM
I am by no means an expert in cooked vs. raw. But I know that vitamin C is pretty unstable and tends to degrade with heating, so canned mandarin oranges for example aren’t doing you much good. Beta-carotene (like in carrots, sweet potatoes and winter squash) is not destroyed with cooking, and breaking down the fiber with cooking makes it easier for the body to absorb. Some veggies just tend to retain their nutrients (or even increase the availability of nutrients) with cooking, like artichokes, beets, garlic, green beans, and celery. When cooked, the available potassium levels in broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower all increase. You do need to pay some attention to cooking method however. This article (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/122267406/PDFSTART?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0) has some interesting information on that.

Also, there are vegetables you just wouldn't eat raw (starchy roots i.e. potatoes, yuca) and grains. You can sprout and eat a lot of grains and beans, but I like a nice plate of cooked rice and beans myself. :)

Maybe a mod wants to split these posts into a new "raw vs. cooked" thread or something?

nelie
05-13-2009, 04:51 PM
I was actually reading an article the other day on pasteurization and saying that it is one of the possible reasons that cows milk can cause so many issues with humans and the only benefit of pasteurization was that farmers could keep milk longer.

I'd agree that children should not be drinking cows milk, well I don't think anyone should but specifically children shouldn't.

Fressca
05-13-2009, 06:06 PM
I am still reading about other foods that increase nutritionally outside of their raw form-and I still haven't finished the book. I am taking it slowly and there is a BUNCH of information there to get through. Very surprising on the cooked food thing... Do you know of other foods that do this as well?

I think it's Dr. Andrew Weil who says that the lycopene in tomatoes is more readily available when they are cooked, and with olive oil. I like to cut some beefsteak tomatoes in half, drizzle on some olive oil, salt and pepper, and bake them for a while at 350. Sometimes I add a sprinkle of parmesan.

Thighs Be Gone
05-13-2009, 06:10 PM
I don't think this is actually very new knowledge. I

I don't think it is new knowledge either--just new to ME! The book I am reading is over 10 years old! I imagine it was accepted as fact well before then. As well read as I "think" I am, there always seems to be a new tidbit that everyone else knew that I've just discovered! :o

Tell me about your uncooked muesli. Do you eat it as breakfast? Are you getting it from bulk bins or what? How long are you soaking? I so completely agree with you about brown rice vs. whole wheat bread--I have noticed the same exact thing.

JulieJ08
05-13-2009, 06:48 PM
Tell me about your uncooked muesli. Do you eat it as breakfast? Are you getting it from bulk bins or what? How long are you soaking?

I'm not getting it from the bulk bins, but I need to find myself a source for that soon! At the moment, I'm using the multi-grain blend from Trader Joe's - rolled oat, and I think rye and barley and wheat (going from memory). I just soak it about 15 minutes in vanilla soymilk and then stir in Greek yogurt. Very creamy ;). The texture is different from cooked oats. I thought at first I didn't care for it. Then I got used to it and prefer it. It's not actually raw, though, I don't think - I believe they cook or steam the grains before packaging (I think true of any standard rolled oats).

Thighs Be Gone
05-13-2009, 07:39 PM
You know that sounds really good--sort of like a summer oatmeal or something. I am going to get some. We don't have Trader Joe's but we do have a farmer's market & Whole Foods.

JulieJ08
05-13-2009, 08:11 PM
You know that sounds really good--sort of like a summer oatmeal or something. I am going to get some. We don't have Trader Joe's but we do have a farmer's market & Whole Foods.

I started having this after having Swiss Muesli at Corner Bakery - but theirs was too sweet, not to mention expensive. I do almost exactly the same as them, but substitute vanilla soymilk for cow milk, and plain Greek yogurt for sweetened vanilla yogurt. The other ingredients are banana, chopped green apple and cranberries and pecans. I actually use walnuts usually.

And yes, a lovely way to have summer oatmeal. Tastes like an honest-to-goodness dessert, to me.

Thighs Be Gone
05-14-2009, 11:33 AM
Thanks for telling me how to do it. I can't wait to try it.

Thighs Be Gone
05-14-2009, 11:33 AM
Thanks for telling me how to do it. I can't wait to try it.

change4thegood
05-15-2009, 01:38 AM
The unsweetened almond breeze almond milk I use has only 40 calories a cup compared with 100 in silk soy milk.
I'm 41 and like to limit my soy since it's got estrogens which can prohibit weight loss. If you are younger it might not matter as much...

ICUwishing
05-15-2009, 12:35 PM
Great discussion! I love to read about nutrition, and it's amazing how every side can produce facts/studies to back up their positions on raw/cooked, dairy, red meat, etc. I think a lot of it comes back to "everybody being a laboratory of one", and figuring out what works for you. The field of nutrigenomics - or how foods activate your genes - is exploding, and the more they learn, the more clear it is that no single direction can possibly work for everyone. That being said ... eating clean, eating whole ... has been the only common thread. What you choose to eat within that sphere and how you fare when eating it ... meat, dairy, gluten, soy, eggs - requires a lot of introspection and self-awareness. :) I am always jealous of those who've figured out their "formulas". All I have so far is a big list of "what it isn't".

JulieJ08
05-15-2009, 12:54 PM
ICUWishing, that is so true. The current emphasis on randomized controlled trials of high validity and significance has been a highly necessary improvement in the practice of medicine. However, it has much tendency to lump everyone together and average out their differences instead of focus on the differences.

willow650
05-15-2009, 01:55 PM
I like the idea of raw nut milks, do any nuts provide calcium?

willow650
05-15-2009, 01:59 PM
I just found this-
Almonds 2 oz., 150 mg of calcium,

So I wonder how much goes into the milk when you make it?

willow68
05-15-2009, 02:37 PM
i just listened to one of jillian michaels' radio shows this morning on my ipod where she was talking about soy in general and mentioned almond milk.

the nutritional value of almond milk seems to be higher. plus i'd like to stay away from too much soy due to a thyroid condition. and i love, love, love tempeh (which is fermented soy, but still...).

will try almond milk from now on in my weekend cereal.

nelie
05-15-2009, 02:43 PM
My goal really is soy in moderation. I'll eat some tofu, some tempeh, some soy milk but maybe a couple times per week?

Willow - Greens are probably your best bet for calcium although nuts are a decent source. I think Bok Choy is one of the highest providers of calcium and dairy is on the moderate level.

willow68
05-15-2009, 03:45 PM
yeah, i am not scared about low calcium levels to be honest. and luckily i love all the green stuff.

i am staying away from tofu and all that processed tofurkey kind of stuff.
tempeh i love. soy or any milk i only use in cereal which i only have on weekends. i hear you re soy in moderation. i used to eat tons of that fake meat when i went vegan. and it wasn't good...

nelie
05-15-2009, 05:55 PM
Oops there are 2 willows :)

I sometimes make my own fake meat but it doesn't have soy in it. I bought some tofu today for the first time in months.

Misti in Seattle
05-19-2009, 12:07 AM
I'm with Partypantalones... Almond Breeze unsweetened vanilla is the best I have found and only 40 calories a cup! The unsweetened chocolate is 45 I think. In fact I am drinking a cup of coffee right this minute with that in it. :)

Misti in Seattle
05-19-2009, 12:09 AM
absolutely almond milk!!! It doesn't have that weird after taste. I love almond milk and frozen blueberry smoothies.


Oh now THERE is something I have to try! Or peaches, raspberries... never thought of that. I use almond milk on porridge or whatever... anything I would use milk for.

Misti in Seattle
05-19-2009, 12:13 AM
One thing to consider... from studies I have read, virtually all soy in the US market was produced using Monsanto Roundup. Of course a lot of almond milk... including Almond Breeze which I use -- does contain some soy lecithen but IMO not as bad as pure soy milk. I did try a brand that did not have it and YUCK -- I could see why they use it as a smoother, etc. But basically -- at least from several studies I saw -- if you are eating soy you are consuming Monsanto Roundup.

JulieJ08
05-19-2009, 12:15 AM
You have to look for organic soy.

Misti in Seattle
05-19-2009, 12:19 AM
I guess so... good point! In any case I much prefer the almond milk anyway.

nelie
05-19-2009, 11:08 AM
Yeah all the soy I buy is organic.

Dominique19
05-23-2009, 08:24 PM
soy milk tastes funny have yet to try almond milk

Dominique19
05-23-2009, 08:25 PM
I will give it a try though

Justafewmore
06-19-2009, 02:49 PM
I like Almond milk more than Soy though I love Soy

jendiet
06-19-2009, 06:20 PM
hey there i decided to jump in...

I actually tried switching to soy milk from cow's milk. But I am still menstruating and boy did that wreak havoc on my cycle. I had estrogen dominance issues to begin with but I was told the phytoestrogens in soy would bind my estrogen receptors so that my available estrogen would go down...I don't think it did that. I got a flare up of endometriosis according to my doctor-that is what caused my organs to get twisted out of shape!

i am currently on prometrium. So I really want to figure out where to buy Almond milk. I don't think rice has enough of anything in it. I might try to make my own. IN the meantime...I found this wonderful full fat cow's milk..it is so natural you actually have to skim the fat off the top like they had to do in the olden days! I can switch to almond milk no problem though.

zenor77
06-19-2009, 06:43 PM
I love almond milk. The unsweetened is much lower in calories than soy milk and it's tasty.

I find that it's the same price as soy milk. It goes on sale often too. I really like the Pacific Brand (35 calories a cup.) They have unsweetened that isn't vanilla flavored, which is my preference.

I do eat soy, but not regularly and mostly fermented soy (tempeh, natto, miso, etc.) From what I understand, fermented soy doesn't have the health problems associated with it that regular soy does.

bargoo
06-19-2009, 07:21 PM
I do not use soy milk because of the estrogen, I like it , though. I use Almond Milk,. I find Almond Breeze at major supermarkets and some neighborhood stores. I get the unsweetened , it is 40 calories.

ICUwishing
06-19-2009, 10:38 PM
I just got back an IgG allergy test that recommended I avoid eating soy more than once every 4 days. No real heartache there - I absolutely love the same unsweetened Almond Breeze that bargoo mentions. I was trying to avoid the unfermented soy products anyway, so no great loss there. :)

Me Too
06-20-2009, 08:11 AM
I must be weird i love soy milk, i even make my own and just ordered a soymilk maker. I tried Almond milk and it has a funny taste to me.

bacilli
06-20-2009, 08:45 AM
It really depends for me. I use almond milk in my oatmeal but if I eat cereal it has to be soy milk.

kaebea
06-20-2009, 10:33 PM
i like almond milk better, but normally buy cows milk, organic or humanely raised. I'm interested in buying it unpasteurized but can't find it that way.

the think i don't like about store bought mild subs. is that when you read the ingredients there's always some kind of sugar and other wierd ingredients added. i've heard almond milk is easy to make, but haven't tried that yet.

JulieJ08
06-20-2009, 11:21 PM
I've always found unsweetened versions pretty easy to find. However, cows milk has a fair amount of sugars, so to get a somewhat equivalent taste does mean allowing for some added sugars. Milk has around 12g sugars and unsweetened soymilk has around 2g (I think - I'm going by memory for both). I find sweetened soymilks with anywhere from about 6g to 15g or more of sugar. I'm still on the fence about it, but it seems like a soymilk with, say 8 or 9g of sugar, some of it added, is not so much worse than cows milk with 12g sugar. I'm going to have to experiment again with buying unsweetened and adding agave syrup. Most (not all) soymilks I find are sweetened with cane sugar.

kaebea
06-23-2009, 08:46 AM
Its not so much the total sugar i'm concerned about. it's additives that make me distrustful of a food at the store.
From a 'Whole Foods" perspective, naturally occurring sugar in cow's milk is ok to me. The problem i have with cows milk though is that i think i may be mildly lactose intolerant, or some other how sensitive to dairy foods. So i have been pondering milk substitutes.
I'm wary of foods that are made as substitutes for other foods in general, bc if you read the ingredients , they are mostly additives. ei, immitation chicken nuggets, immitation meats of all kinds. Just bc something is marketed as a healthier alternative does not make it a whole food in my view.

making my own almond milk does appeal to me though, where i can control what sweetner is used, if any. and i just got this recipe emailed to me the other day if anyone is interested:

http://drbenkim.com/almond-milk-recipe.htm