Weight Loss Support - Is the attempt or the results of losing weight more important?




teawithsunshine
03-31-2009, 11:31 PM
Hey guys--

Philosophical question I'm throwing out here....

Sometimes I feel guilty about not working out as hard as I could (i.e. fatigue, tiredness, stress, etc) one day for instance-- especially when it's after not losing much weight one week).

So here goes: do you think the effort of trying to lose weight (not having a very good workout for instance but still showing up "to the plate" and still trying to exercise for that day and doing good on your calories instead of binging) or the results in keeping losing weight/inches-- is more important?

~ tea


mandalinn82
03-31-2009, 11:40 PM
I think that they're both important. BUT - putting in that effort means you're making healthy things a habit. Even on a higher-cal day, for example, I track on FitDay, because I want tracking to be a habit. Exercising every day, even if some days I'm tired and have to tone it down, is a habit I want to build, so doing SOMETHING, even if it's not 100% of what I'd like, helps me to build and maintain that habit.

Bumbleberry
04-01-2009, 02:43 AM
The results are more important but I firmly believe that long-term results are from "the attempt" (habitual, permanent changes).

As a yo-yo dieter, I can tell you that results are what you're there for, but those "results" are fleeting and meaningless if you cannot maintain them.


JayEll
04-01-2009, 07:19 AM
My thoughts on this are that people often fall into a gung-ho, be-all-that-you-can-be, boot camp mentality. But it's not necessary to be going all-out, all the time with exercise for it to have a positive effect on weight loss.

I think it's important to suit up and show up. Like the other posters said, you're forming habits.

Example: I am older, and my trainer at the gym gave me a workout series for using the treadmill, elliptical, etc. On day 1, I'm supposed to do 40 minutes with my heart rate at 113. One-thirteen, what???? I typically had been doing 20-30 minutes with my HR at 120! But after 40 minutes, I am sweating up a storm, even at the lower HR, and even though I don't feel like I'm working "that hard."

Jay

midwife
04-01-2009, 08:29 AM
I think the behaviors are more important than the results. I can control the behaviors directly, but the results may or may not happen in the timeframe I would prefer. I also think it is to easy to get caught up in all of the philosophical issues surrounding weightloss....it can be important to get the mind-game right, but when it comes down to it, our bodies respond to the biology of nutrition and movement.

sprklemajik
04-01-2009, 09:53 AM
I think the behaviors are more important than the results. I can control the behaviors directly, but the results may or may not happen in the timeframe I would prefer. I also think it is to easy to get caught up in all of the philosophical issues surrounding weightloss....it can be important to get the mind-game right, but when it comes down to it, our bodies respond to the biology of nutrition and movement.

I agree, the most important parts for me are the things I can do something about. Even if I eat well all week and exercise like I need to be I can still not see any results. It doesn't mean I'm not healthier.

KDuffer
04-01-2009, 11:25 AM
In the long run, I don't think results are possible without the effort put into it. Personally, I know if I skip a day or two of working out or eating well, it can easily lead to weeks and months. So, even if I'm feeling tired, sleepy or just don't want to work out, I make it a point to not give myself a choice and go to the gym. In the end I generally find that I am okay once I am there. And on the days that I am sluggish, I just take it easy--but at least I burned more calories than if I just stayed home.

kaplods
04-01-2009, 11:32 AM
I think this is a bit of a chicken or egg question. They're not independent issues, they're connected. You can assign each far too much or far too little importance. If you're only concerned with results, you can start thinking that the ends justify the means, and be tempted to try very unsustainable and even unsafe methods to lose the weight. If it's the attempt that matters, you could find yourself concerned that you're not putting in enough effort and be disatisfied with the results (regardless of the results) or on the other hand, you can find yourself in "at least I tried" mode, not putting in enough effort to see progress.

I guess the short version is "both matter," and the challenge is giving each the appropriate importance in your life. For me, the behaviors are most important, because they have health benefits aside from the weight loss, and that's what I'm focusing on - BUT we're still talking about results here. Because, I'm still focused on results, it's just that the number on the scale is not the only or most important result that I'm looking for. It's not just about weight loss, it's about feeling physically better, having fewer symptoms and more strength and stamina, living better and maybe even longer (and possibly even being able to get back to work).

lixximajig
04-01-2009, 11:41 AM
I feel the journey, the route to the end goal, is really the one that counts. When you go through the process of any journey, you're bound to understand yourself a whole lot better. Take weight loss, for example. Through this journey you understand what makes you tick, what's your trigger, how far you're willing to push yourself, how much mental capabilities you have... and so on. Without the journey, even if you do meet your goal, it would have meant nothing.

It's like, even though you're fatigue, but you still work out and maybe your body doesn't feel the burn in the end, your mind does. You've pushed your mind beyond the initial fatigue.

ICUwishing
04-02-2009, 10:33 AM
Great question, tea! And great thoughts from everyone, too. I think I'm still emphasizing the effort and techniques at this point, because they AREN'T habits yet, and just enjoying the fruits of the labor - the results. Maybe when I get to where I"m going, then the results will just be "who I am"? But I think the "showing up" part is especially critical. Every now and then, my brain rebels against the exercise and I manage to make myself do it - and then I end up having a fantastic workout that I didn't think I wanted. :)

Glory87
04-02-2009, 10:56 AM
I think the attempt is the most important. You're never going to lose weight unless you do the work. If you don't attempt, you will get 0 results.

Lori Bell
04-02-2009, 11:22 AM
HUmmm...well, my Grandma used to always say "The road to **** is paved with good intentions...":)

Though this relatively new wave phrase of calling a diet a "journey" gives us permission to make these half hearted attempts at weight loss and makes it acceptable. Just part of the journey...like gliding down a steep hill after making the long trek up. The fork in the road, the detour sign...all now acceptable excuses for making conscious pit stops along the way. Who can say if a journey is any better than a diet? What ever works for you is best.

I personally don't want to be at the loosing part forever, I'm really excited about the maintaining process, and I have worked out a program that I think I can always live with...and massive amounts of exercise is something I can't live with. I have a life and kids and a house and a farm and I can't spend hours a day at a gym... I have also spent way too many years just thinking about it...pretending to care and making half hearted attempts...so I guess my answer is the end result. It doesn't matter how you get there, just as long as you get there safely and healthfully.

Tomato
04-02-2009, 12:04 PM
Example: I am older, and my trainer at the gym gave me a workout series for using the treadmill, elliptical, etc. On day 1, I'm supposed to do 40 minutes with my heart rate at 113. One-thirteen, what???? I typically had been doing 20-30 minutes with my HR at 120! But after 40 minutes, I am sweating up a storm, even at the lower HR, and even though I don't feel like I'm working "that hard."

Jay

Jay,

Did you trainer explain why? I am interested in this as I am currently doing cardio on an elliptical and I typically stay on it for 35 minutes (on Total Body Workout) and my HR is around 150. (I won't comment on the amount of my sweat :D ). Does your trainer see the longer session with lower HR as more efficient?

Sorry for hijacking the thread.