Exercise! - Exercising with a cold




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Romriter
01-04-2009, 12:38 PM
I started an exercise program yesterday - moderate, fit for my level - and came down with an extreme cold last night. Can't breathe, coughing, sneezing. I have 2 questions.

First, does anyone else have this experience of starting a program and immediately getting sick? How do I prevent this? Should I just work through it - exercising anyway?

When you do have a cold, or some other bug, should you work out? At the moment all I'm doing is walking, so I'm not lugging weights or anything like that. Anyone have a recommendation?

Thanks so much!!

Romriter


rubbytummy
01-04-2009, 01:23 PM
Your mileage may vary, but when I'm sick, especially with a respiratory bug, I definitely amp down my exercise. If I'm feeling up for it, I still try to walk, but nothing that really gets my heart pounding. That way I don't feel like an atrophied mess once I'm recovered, but I also try not to run the risk of making myself feel worse.

JulieJ08
01-04-2009, 01:54 PM
Ditto what rubbytummy just said. I'm just getting over a cold right now. I normally run 3 miles M-W-F, but did nothing the first few days, then walked 30 minutes, then ran 1.5 miles. I was a week into it before I ran 3 miles again. I could tell a difference, but I have no idea how much of that was a little deconditioning, and how much was residual cold symptoms. But I think by the end of this week I'll probably be back to normal. I think walking is the perfect compromise, being doable and keeping you moving, but not too much. Even a light stroll, if that's all you're up for, helps keep the habit in place. Sometimes losing the habit of exercise for a week is worse than losing the exercise itself.


Romriter
01-04-2009, 02:03 PM
Thanks! It's very encouraging to hear that others have similar challenges. I'm definitely going walking this afternoon - the wind has died down and there's actual sunshine! I'm shooting for 15 to 20 minutes of very casual strolling, just to keep the joints from forgetting what they were made to do.

Thanks again.