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Old 04-11-2006, 10:32 AM   #16  
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Ugh -- I am sorry but you can't even make me eat Tofu. I am trying to incorporate my healthier eating to my oldest (who unfortunately is built just like me) -- trying is the word. She is a tween with low self esteem (probably also got that from me) trying to get her to do anything is like pulling teeth. I would like to tape this show just so she could see it, now programming my VCR is another issue LOL

I do agree though that the show took it a bit to the extreme!
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Old 04-11-2006, 10:50 AM   #17  
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Yeah, although I found the kids kind of bratty I'm not surprised they rebelled - it did seem punitive-. I'm hoping the next show will be a bit more positive.

There is a show in Britain that is similar but with three families competing to see which family loses the most - ugh! The intro is horrible - very stereotyping of overweight people and I found it really offensive - the trainers were really rude too! Same with the You Are What You Eat program - the show is good but the doctor is really rude and hurtful and I know it's their job but find that part to be unneccessary.

I just don't see how bullying, berating and making people feel bad about themselves is going to help them to learn to lead a healthy lifestyle.
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Old 04-15-2006, 03:14 AM   #18  
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I just caught the show tonight. I defiinitely think parents need to ensure they are passing on good habits to their children, but the flip side is being restrictive doesn't necessarily solve the problem.

My parents never allowed nutritionally-poor food in the house. They got me into sports, limited TV, etc., but it all just forced me "underground." I became a closet-eater, stole their loose change to buy junk food at school, hid food under my bed, and got creative with turning the healthy foods in the house into binge food (soy nuts, almonds, fruit, etc.). They tried hard; I tried harder.

As an adult, I'm now trying to learn why I "needed' the food so badly and what I was/am trying to compensate for. I have great parents and had a very stable childhood, I just have always had a VERY dysfunctional relationship with food. I guess my long-winded point is that it's not always just about bad habits, but the emotions underlying them.

P.S.- Dittos from me on the slobby appearance of the first age progression shots! Grrr...
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Old 04-15-2006, 05:36 PM   #19  
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I watched this show and I think it has its problems, but over all it has really important information that the public needs to hear. I don't think it was necessary to make them eat tofu. I don't know many young kids who like that sort of thing, especially ones who are used to processed foods. There must have been ways to improve their diets without making it so traumatic for everyone involved.

The age progression thing... hmm.. do less healthy/overweight people naturally gravitate towards growing mullets and not grooming their unibrows? They even gave one of the negative outcomes an earring! How did they get that?
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Old 04-21-2006, 09:48 AM   #20  
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I watched the show again on Monday. I find the doctor/nutritionist whatever she is to be wholly unpleasant. I know they are taking a hard approach to people but I don't like her way of talking to these people at times.

I agree that the program could be done in a less traumatic manner but then I guess that doesn't make for good t.v.

I can't believe that they made a family who never eats fish/seafood eat the stuff three nights in a row - not fair at all. Again, why can't they just show them how to cook healthier versions of things they like?

I'm finding the age progression thing a bit annoying too and totally agree with _bees opinion.
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Old 04-21-2006, 04:48 PM   #21  
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I had been really anxious to watch it and finally caught it the other night and was pretty disappointed. That whole aging thing is so ridiculous - I mean honestly after 3 weeks how can you really do that meaningfully and the big smiles on the 'after improvement' pictures were completely stupid!!

BUT I totally agree that good habits make for healthy lives and there are so many people so out of control. I am terribly proud of my teenage sons choices in food and eating - not that they are all healthy all the time, but they appreciate the right things and are so fit and slim. I always have believed in a family dinner with real food and the boys even get to lighting the candles, they appreciate the event as much as the adults.

And yah, there is a middle zone between potato chips and tofu. LOL.
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Old 04-25-2006, 09:40 AM   #22  
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I watched again last night hoping this would get better - it doesn't

I don't like the format of the show or the doctor/dietician - she isn't very personable although she may be a pleasant person in real like the show makes it look like she is a dragon lady I find the aging process photos silly too.

However it does show that people can change their habits and learn to enjoy exercising (the kids loved the Karate classes and the parents got into the family bike rides). What is nice is that not only did it wake the parents up to their bad eating habits it helped them cut back on t.v. time, establish routines and spend time together as a family. Last night the dad realized that he was missing out on his sons' childhoods and vowed that he would spend more time with them.
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Old 04-26-2006, 01:02 PM   #23  
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I have major issues with this show. When i saw the previews, I thought "excellent, a show that will show that healthy lifestyle changes will make a difference."

In the first episode, I believe, there was a little boy who was starting to closet eat, he stole food from the pile, hid the wrapper,and got punished for eating it and belittled for it. It pretty much told the kids "you can never have your favorite foods again, watching tv, even on a rainy day is always bad, and there is something fundamentally wrong with everything you enjoy."

The better approach, asmentioned would be teaching the family to prepare healthy meals, based off a profile of their favorite foods. Love chicken sandwiches and fries from fast food places? Teach them how to make a tasty marinaded chicken breast, slap it on a whole wheat bun and have a small baked potato with low fat toppings. I don't think most of these family's will be able to maintain their prescribed lifestyle for long because it was quite restrictive.

They failed to address the emotional issues that the child might face while being overweight. i liked that the kids got to take a class doing something active though. Also, they didn't focus much on nutrition education.

Last night, the lady told a husky boy, that eating hot dogs would increase his chance of getting diabetes! No, first, there are healthier hot dogs with like fifty calories a dog, and on a diet hot dog bun or lite piece of bread, its like a 100 calorie thing! Second, I have yet to see a study that showed a correlation between enjoying a hot dog and diabetes. Scare tactics are never ok, especially not with kids.
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Old 04-26-2006, 02:49 PM   #24  
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Yes, some of the reactions from the kids seemed like they were acting out because they felt they were being punished for their bad eating behaviours. Mind you I'm sure the producers show only the most harrowing and dramatic scenes and we don't get to see some of the footage.

The mom on that last show was exhausted and frustrated from all the cooking she was doing, ended up getting really crabby and took it out on her kids One meal ended up taking 3 hours between preparing and cooking. Not fair on anyone!

All three episodes have given the families what seem like hard to make meals with ingredients they don't normally eat (clams, squid, tofu,etc.) and that are too extreme a change.

I set my mum up with my WW materials and planned her meals around foods she liked or healthier versions of those foods so don't tell me they couldn't do that for the families.

Being forced to eat things you don't like will not help you stick to your plan. I know sometimes kids refuse to eat things just to be difficult and test the limits but if the food is making them physically gag then don't force them.

I probably won't watch anymore of the show - I gave it 3 chances now and I still don't care for it.
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Old 04-26-2006, 04:25 PM   #25  
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Interesting. When I saw the promos for this show, I got a bad feeling about it. It just seemed like it was going to be sensationalist. I think the title was my first indication (just a tad alarmist, don't you think?).

Then, I saw little snippets (I haven't actually seen a whole show). The age progression part was intriguing, but seemed so biased. None of the after photos showed happy, smiling adults. Instead, they all looked miserable, with bags and dark circles under the eyes. Why not put ratty old bathrobes on the guys and sloppy curlers and dirty bunny slippers on the women? Y'know, just to complete the "loser" image?

Forcing the kids to eat foods that are totally foreign to them? Indicating that if they don't eat "healthy" (which seemingly translates out to boring, tasteless, dull, no-fun), they're doomed to a life of absolute misery? Yeah, that's motivating for a 10-year-old... ((sarcasm off))...

Sounds like the show has lived down to my expectations and then some. What a shame
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Old 04-26-2006, 05:11 PM   #26  
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I agree Lena. I only watched what I think was the first one - the one with the three boys. They took these kids and switched them straight from pizza to tofu. I thought it was ridiculous in that respect, although they did have some good suggestions, especially for the Mom. There are a zillion ways to make kid friendly healthy food and they seemed to not even attempt that.
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Old 04-29-2006, 01:44 AM   #27  
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I have to agree with Amy8888. The food they offered I thought was disgusting, esp. to be "appealing" to young kids! I thought it'd be good to show them how to make some of their favorite foods "healthier". You know like show them how to do a healthy pizza or something that kids would enjoy? Not squid! What kid would want to eat that after eating Pizza, etc? lol.
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Old 04-29-2006, 11:10 PM   #28  
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Quote:
, I have yet to see a study that showed a correlation between enjoying a hot dog and diabetes
It may not be highly publicized but they are there. I am currently reading The China Study. I suggest you go and get a copy at your local library. You will learn a lot. There is a strong correlation between Type 1 diabetes and Animal product intake. There are many many studies out there that show a diet high in animal products and byproducts is bad for you, but most people dont want to hear about them.

I recommend everyone read The China Study by T Colin Cambell.
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Old 04-30-2006, 12:37 PM   #29  
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First, I haven't read the study, and do see where animal prodcuts would do that, but not strictly hot dogs. Secondly, Type one diabetes is an autoimmune disease, such as Lupus and many others, in which the body's antibodies attack the beta cells in the pancreas making it unable to produce insulin. It is in no way supported that this is brought on by diet or weight. It occurs in infants, and most people with the disease are diagnosed by age 15, though there are adult cases that tend to have a slower onset. Type two diabetes is often related to diet and obesity (though not always) in which the body either doesn't make enough insulin or can not use it's insulin effectively. Type two diabetes might be caused by consuming excessive calories with a diet high in meat. They are two different diseases with similar ramifications, but very different origins in the body.

I'm not sure if you read fully what i said about healthier options. There are healthier alternatives to a typical full fat all beef hot dog. 100 hot dog, which includrd fiber, little fat (from a ff dog or a white meat hot dog), and protien, abit high in salt, with an apple and some veggies for lunch is an okay meal for a kids. Maybe not everyday because it is so processed, but i don't think that it will lead a kid down a path to a life threatening disease which complications include a heightened risk of coronary heart disease, kidney failure, blindness, and amputation, in conjunction with healthier choices. Obviously, consuming large amounts of animal fat on a daily basis is bad, therefore eating a full fat hot dog a couple times a day is bad. I really don't think telling a child that eating a hot dog will give him a chronic disease is a good way of handling things. Kids are going to eat hot dogs. Maybe tell him he can have one of the healthier hot dogs. THat would be more effective and create a better transition. If you are going to say stop eating hot dogs, as a blanket statment because they cause diabetes, it would only be logical to cut out all animal products and biproducts which is not what they are doing on the show. I don't tend to read research from books unless I can previously find it in a medical journal, but I will look into it. I agree that it is ideal to cut out meat and animal products, but threatening a child with diabetes is taking it much too far. Animal prodcuts are high in fat, and a diet high in saturated fat is one of the things that are a factor in diabetes. Chances are if he continued his high calorie diet, with or without animal products he would still be at a very high risk for obesity related diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Scare tactics do not work and are cruel with children. There are healthier alternatives (turkey dogs, chicken dogs, ff beef franks, veggie dogs) to beef hot dogs, which should be exlored before saying that a kids will get a disease from them. This doesn't just apply to hot dogs, it applies to most "kid" food. It can often be made much healthier than the most available version. Want pizza, take a whole wheat pita, slap some tomato sauce on it, put some low fat or fat free mozzerella on it, veggies if the kid likes, put it in the toaster over, an viola, you have a personal pizza for around 200 calories, a sensible, quick meal.
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Old 04-30-2006, 01:35 PM   #30  
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I think the problem was that the doctor/nutritionist said if you eat hot dogs then you will get diabetes - which was a blanket statement and there was no explanation as to why. It seemed like a scare tactic.
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