New Drug - now THIS sounds interesting!!

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  • Quote: Well, since it is estimated that 1,000 people die each year from aspirin, I guess you *could* be right in saying "all drugs are poison". BUT on the other hand...what about lives that were prolonged or SAVED due to modern medicine? Saying "All drugs are poison" is throwing the baby out with the bathwater - really no different than saying "all carbs are bad" or whatever.
    I wholeheartedly agree with that MrsJim. I know a lot of people raised a fuss when vioxx was taken off the market, I for one was one of the people it helped and I have no ill side-effects from it. Same goes for weightloss prescriptions, a lot of people don't agree with it being used especially because it causes harm to SOME people.

    As many of you know I have taken Meridia for a number of months now and have no side effects whatsoever.

    Anyway on to my point, I think that to some degree the prescription drug companies are responsible for doing more than adequate research to alert us as to who can or cannot take specific drugs. There are drugs that help many people but in some instances it can kill another person.

    So to kind of sum it up, what works for one may not work for another. As MrsJim said look at all the deaths from aspirin but it's still sitting on the shelf, should we yank that too? I'm willing to bet that every drug OTC or RX on the market today has caused the death of some person somewhere. Not every situation is the same and sometimes there isn't going to be a common link that we can associate, but that is where our duty as consumers comes in. Amidst all the rhetoric and fallacy and small print there are answers, and when people decided (along with their doctors) to take these medications they also agreed that they read and understand the package inserts.

    I of course am not a medical or scientific professional so this is all my opinion. But I do know that everytime a doctor prescribes a med for me it is my right to decline to take it.
  • Hi Michelle:\

    I've heard that Merck? will be bringing Vioxx back on market....but I don't know details, I either read it somewhere or heard a blurb on the news that was playing in the background noise. I would think it would be a slightly different configuration (safer)
  • for general information:

    I ran into the pharmaceutical rep. today.....asked her about Acomplia....she believes it should be on the market in the first quarter of 2006. Also told me that the majority of patients in the clinical trials were women.
  • Ohhh thanks for the information marble!! I'm hoping I'm at goal by that time so I won't get to try it but I am anxious to hear about the results of other people who are going to take it once it's released.
  • (isn't Marbleflys the most ridicules on-screen name....my daughter was in junior high at the time i registered in 1999 and I listened to her......).

    I was plaguing the rep. with questions about Acomplia.....(we've known each other for almost 6-7 years when i worked in another dept. that used her products). When i was speaking about my stubborn mid-section, she told me how most of the study patients were women who were more successful.
  • MrsJim..You are right. More and more insurance companies are refusing to cover the cost of surgery because they feel that it is up to us to take control over what goes in our mouth and do all we can to prevent the the surgery from taking place.

    I know a lady whose husband works with mine. The surgery nearly killed her last year. YOu always hear about the ones who had a successful recovery, you do not hear about the ones who died or almost died from the surgery.

    I am on xenical right now. It is a slow process but I am losing. Maybe not as fast as someone on the other drugs but still a loss. Will I take this drug if it comes out? I don't know. Perhaps not right off the bat but maybe later.

    I think they will eventually come up with a drug that will fight obesity. I just don't know when.
  • Quote: I wholeheartedly agree with that MrsJim. I know a lot of people raised a fuss when vioxx was taken off the market, I for one was one of the people it helped and I have no ill side-effects from it. Same goes for weightloss prescriptions, a lot of people don't agree with it being used especially because it causes harm to SOME people.


    I was on redux about three months when it was taken off. It was helping me but look at what it was doing to others.

    I wish people would not try and condemn those of us who do take the pills. We all have to do this our own way, whichever way works best for us.
  • Quote: I wish people would not try and condemn those of us who do take the pills. We all have to do this our own way, whichever way works best for us.
    Speaking for myself, as I said previously...one of the bonuses IMO of Acomplia - IF it actually works in practice and IF it is approved by the FDA - would be its anticipated effect on the big scam market - you know, all those 'diet pills' that are sold online or in the backs of magazines or in infomercials and are asked about here SO often at Buyer Beware - the vast majority are a total waste of money and/or are VASTLY overpriced for what little they actually DO.

    If there's a safe and effective pill that doctors (and I'm not talking about those weight-loss-clinic type of doctors, I'm referring to your PCP) feel comfortable prescribing to their patients on a regular basis (my own PCP will NOT prescribe diet pills except as an ABSOLUTE last resort at this point), then I predict and HOPE that the pill scam marketers will fade away. It really angers me to see how they keep taking innocent people for a ride...and I want that to STOP.
  • I also agree that there is no miracle cure, but they are not claiming that this pill is a cure. If you read the articles, the patients in the studies reduced their daily caloric intake by 600 calories. They aren't claiming that if you take the pill and don't make any other lifestyle changes that you will magically lose weight. Since the premise of this pill is that is helps to control cravings and such, health benefits probably occured because those on the pill were more likely to reach for fruit or vegetables or other healthy snacks and meals rather than chocolate, ice cream, greasy pizza, or any of the other things we eat that are bad for us, yet we submit to the cravings.

    I guess what I'm getting at is that, no, there is no magical pill to make us all skinny, but this isn't claiming to do that anyway. I'll probably never take it simply because I don't like taking pills (I have to pretty much be on my death bed to pop a Tylenol or Sudafed).

    As for FDA approval, you would think that they need to study these things more thoroughly because of what has happened in the past, but look at artificial sweeteners. How many huge issues did we have in the past with artificial sweeteners causing problems, and yet Splenda is out there, FDA-approved, and is now being found to cause health problems for some people? As much as I would like to believe that the FDA is there for our protection, I more-realistically believe that they are moving things more quickly through than they should due to corporate pressures to expedite revenues.
    I wasn't a science major or a medical student or anything like that. I was a Business student, so feel free to take this expression of my opinions with a grain of salt
  • Jill - I think you're exactly right about Acomplia - it's not being purported as a magic pill - just a possible aid. Ultimately it is up to the individual to adopt and maintain healthy permanent lifestyle changes to lose and keep weight off!

    I don't know if I should even go into the artificial sweetener debate. Splenda, asparatame and saccharin have been studied and researched for years (saccharin has actually been around for well over 100 years and has a great safety record!) and I personally believe they are safe and can be used with no problems for the vast majority of the general public. Of course there is always going to be a segment of the population who will have an adverse reaction to Splenda or asparatame, just as there are people who have adverse reactions to MSG, dairy products, wheat, peanuts, etc. I know that you've probably seen the anti-sweetener websites (one even run by the Sugar Institute - can't take the competition I guess!) but it is important to realize that the organizations behind them very much have their own agendas at play.

    You can go to pubmed.com and browse through the published, peer-reviewed studies on pretty much anything...here's one abstract for example...

    Quote:
    Ann Oncol. 2004 Oct;15(10):1460-5.

    Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk?

    Weihrauch MR, Diehl V.

    Department of Internal Medicine I of the University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. [email protected]

    Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible.
    and some more studies can be found here...

    IMO - the bottom line for any kind of drug or food or whatever comes up to this - if you don't want to use it, then you don't have to...it's a personal choice. Personally I would say that the people going after artificial sweeteners should shift their efforts towards tobacco, trans fats, and high-fructose corn syrup instead - they're FAR more harmful to the general population!
  • Accomplia
    I hope its a big winner..I bought stock in the company when I read all the positive reports on it.
  • Slim do you know of a site to go buy stock??
  • Quote: Slim do you know of a site to go buy stock??
    Not Slim, but...the stock is traded on the NYSE. (NYSE listing code is SNY)

    Their investor relations page is here ==> http://www.sanofi-synthelabo.us/index.html

    You could probably buy the stock from etrade.com (this is NOT an endorsement - I've never done business with them myself) or any broker or firm licensed/registered with the SEC.

    http://www.sec.gov/investor/brokers.htm
  • I saw a presentation about rimonabant (Acompli) at the ICRS conference last year. My husband researches similar drugs but not for a pharmaceutical company, he's in acedemics. It seems that the drug really is safe and really does make you lose weight but the bad news is that it will probably only work while you 're taking it, so after you stop, you'll gain the weight back. Also there is serious speculation that one if the reasons it works is because it makes you nauseous and therefore you don't eat. It had a hogh drop out weight at the higher dose because of this. This didn't happen at the lower dose but it did cause weight loss either. The good news is that it has open the door for other cannabinoid researched to work on other drugs that work on the same principles and that work is very promising. I really think that it will be this line of research that will create a drug that will help.
  • yep... pop a pill and... woooolaaaaaa a size 2...