New to Hypothyroid - Page 2 - 3 Fat Chicks on a Diet Weight Loss Community


Dieting with Obstacles Those with special health concerns such as diabetes, fibromyalgia, pregnancy, etc can post here for extra support and help.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-22-2006, 05:43 PM   #16  
Queen of Chaos!
 
mysticvix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Innerleithen, Scottish Borders.
Posts: 196

Thumbs up

Greetings from Scotland!
I've just been diagnosed with Hypothyroism, so this thread (and forum) has been a great help.
Just thought I'd stick my head round the door and say hi!
mysticvix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 05:44 PM   #17  
Senior Member
 
Misti in Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 8,793

Height: 5'8.5"

Default

Hi mysticvix! Good having you here! Glad you got the hypothyroid diagnosed as this is the first step of course to getting the treatment you need! That stuff can really mess you up but it CAN get better!! Hang in there!!

I LOVED Scotland when I was there... friendliest people anywhere! Edinburgh was grand!!! Also spent the night at a tiny town right on the border of Scotland and England... LOL I got off there at the advice of passengers on the train when it broke down and I had to change my plans!!! ??something--on-Avon; forgot. But it was incredible! Wow oh wow one of my favorite vacation memories ever!!
Misti in Seattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 05:55 PM   #18  
Queen of Chaos!
 
mysticvix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Innerleithen, Scottish Borders.
Posts: 196

Default

Hi Misti, thanks for the welcome. I've just started treatment this week and I have to go back in 5 weeks for more bloods.
I'm originally from Edinburgh (grew up in the shadow of the castle!) and I now live in a small town in the Borders.
I've no idea where your mystery vacation stop was but I doubt it was on Avon - that's "down south" most likely to have been somewhere on Tyne or Tweed as they are the two big rivers in the Borders.
mysticvix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 06:19 PM   #19  
Senior Member
 
Misti in Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 8,793

Height: 5'8.5"

Default

Hi mystic... how did they find your hypothyroid? Hope the testing goes well for you. I had a huge tumor so had half of mine removed but the surgery was not all that bad.

Oh I loved the castle at Edinburgh! Neat that you grew up so close to it! But LOL I am fortunate in that I live in Seattle and Edinburgh reminded me a LOT of this area of the US!

I remembered the town after digging on the Internet. It was Berwick Upon Tweed! I had the most fun evening there exploring, and found a neat little B&B to stay in! I ended up being really glad the train broke down.
Misti in Seattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2006, 03:38 AM   #20  
Queen of Chaos!
 
mysticvix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Innerleithen, Scottish Borders.
Posts: 196

Default

Hi,
I was at the doctors a few weeks back for a repeat prescription of an anti-depressant I've been on for about a year, I mentioned to him that I felt tired all the time, and had no motivation to do anything as I thought it might be a side effect of the AD's He suggested we check my thyroid levels, and lo and behold it was my thyroid all the time!
what beats me is that after doing some research on the net about symptoms etc it sems that I've probably had an underactive tyroid for about 20 years and none of the doc's i've seen have ever thought of testing me!
Still at least I know now, and I can look forward to feeling "normal" again (whatever that means!)
Glad you enjoyed Berwick, it's a lovely town I go to a motorcycle rally every year at their rugby club!
mysticvix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2006, 09:32 AM   #21  
Senior Member
 
Misti in Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 8,793

Height: 5'8.5"

Default

The lack of diagnosis is soooooooooooooo typical! Doctors just don't check it unless you ask or there is a specific reason! I had just had a physical by my doctor who is very efficient... but she did not notice a huge lump on the side of my neck! Nor had I, amazingly enough! I went to a surgeon for removal of a breast lump -- he walked in, introduced himself, took one look at me and said "you have a very enlarged thyroid." And like you, I had had classic symptoms for years!

I am sure you know that weight gain is another classic effect! As an adult I had always fought a battle with it... but my weight ballooned 100 pounds within a year and I could not get it off so gave up trying which of course was a huge mistake! Just curious... do you carry your weight on top... and stomach? That and the thin arms and legs (which is how I carry mine) is typical of hypothyroid. But now that I have my meds adjusted right, I've been losing really well... of course I am working really hard at it, but that's okay!

Yah Berwick was gorgeous! But what I enjoyed most about Scotland was that the people were so friendly and helpful! A guy I met traveling over on the boat to France said in Edinburgh he was standing on the street in the pouring rain looking at a map trying to figure out where he was going. Someone came up and asked if they could help him find someplace. He found out the person worked on third floor of an office building and had seen him and come all the way down to help! Amazing!!!

I was impressed because I went to a Scottish festival at some theater... and they gave discounts if I showed my foreign passport! A welcome to tourists! Wow MOST places play "soak the tourist" but they gave us reduced price because we were their guests!
Misti in Seattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2006, 09:48 AM   #22  
Queen of Chaos!
 
mysticvix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Innerleithen, Scottish Borders.
Posts: 196

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Misti in Seattle

Just curious... do you carry your weight on top... and stomach? That and the thin arms and legs (which is how I carry mine) is typical of hypothyroid.
In a word yes! Most of my weight is in my torso area, although I wouldn't say the rest of me was skinny, it's certainly disproportionate!
mysticvix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2006, 09:56 AM   #23  
Senior Member
 
Misti in Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 8,793

Height: 5'8.5"

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticvix
In a word yes! Most of my weight is in my torso area, although I wouldn't say the rest of me was skinny, it's certainly disproportionate!
Well I couldn't really call mine "skinny" right now either except as you said, in proportion! But hey, let's work together and get this off!!

See you this time next year in One-derland!!! Deal?

in Seattle
Misti in Seattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2006, 10:02 AM   #24  
Senior Member
 
Misti in Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 8,793

Height: 5'8.5"

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms. Shapen
It wasn't until about a year ago, when I started seeing an endocrinologist, that I started feeling my best (although I still could use some improvement). He was the one who told me to take my Synthroid about half an hour before eating breakfast. He told me to take it roughly the same time everyday.
No one has ever told me to do that!! Fortunately I usually take it in the morning before leaving for work and I eat breakfast at work so do that; but on weekends I probably don't. Thanks for the tip!!! Every little bit helps!!

Oh another thing... when I got increased from 50 mcg to 75 mcg, I accidentally filled the old prescription so just cut one in half and took 1-1/2 tablets. The pharmacist advised me NOT to do that with this med as it can cause problems!!
Misti in Seattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2006, 04:52 PM   #25  
Caution: Wide Load
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Michigan
Posts: 34

S/C/G: Huge/Big/Average

Default

Well, I only stated what my doctor told me. Everyone is different and NO ONE should take ANY medical statement from one person (on a write-in forum no less) as an across-the-board treatment.

My doctor is an endocrinologist and I have to trust his judgement FOR ME. I would think that if there was a chance of me having a heart attack, he wouldn't be stupid to open himself up to that liability. I HAVE heard that the chance of getting osteoporosis increases if a person is kept at a dose that is too much over an extended period of time. BUT I didn't hear that from my endocrinologist . . . I heard it from a nurse at my family doctor's office, so I have to consider that it may not be correct info.

It is my understanding that the dosage of medication is increased gradually, because it's more effective than giving someone a larger dose and realizing it's too much and having to keep playing with it before getting it right.

As it is, with the way my thyroid works, I have to keep getting my meds adjusted nearly every year, since it never is consistent.

The best a person can do is keep going to doctors until he/she finds the doctor that will be most beneficial - then ask the doctor for advice.
Ms. Shapen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2006, 09:29 PM   #26  
Senior Member
 
Misti in Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 8,793

Height: 5'8.5"

Default

Oh I agree completey! Sorry if my message came across as if I was blindly accepting what you said. Believe me that is one big reason I pretty much stay out of the thyroid support groups... most of them are not only whiny but they tell you to ignore your doctor and do what THEY tell you; and the follow a woman with a famous book, etc. I do what my doctor tells me... and it's working!
Misti in Seattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2006, 10:57 PM   #27  
Senior Member
 
RebaR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Alabama
Posts: 203

S/C/G: 280/241/150

Height: 5'5"

Default

Hey ya'll,

I was diagnosed with hypothyroid 10 years ago... I was suicidal and had attempted suicide...they did blood work to make sure there wasn't something contributing.... my thyroid was off... that wasn't the total cause, but I know for me it contributed because whenever my meds are off, I get moody and depressed some.... My meds have been changed many times over the years...my doc checks it every 3 to 6 months.... I was somewhat surprised this week when we discovered it was out of whack...(I also have a good friend that can tell when i'm off- she'll ask me if i've had my blood checked...) I was in for my normal check up (I'm diabetic, hypothyroid, high cholestrol, high blood pressure)... and while my HbgA1C (for diabetes) was normal, the cholesterol etc was up... he was trying to figure out why until he hit my TSH level- it was elevated.... so my med has been changed again... now of course, hindsight is 20/20...He said that the thyroid being off affects the other things... I can see some symptoms...things that I had other excuses for - tiredness etc....so, now I'm ready for this new dose to kick in!!

Reba
RebaR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2006, 11:21 PM   #28  
Senior Member
 
Misti in Seattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 8,793

Height: 5'8.5"

Default

Hi Reba

Wow I can certainly relate... I thought I was losing my mind when my thyroid was all messed up and I didn't know it. Interesting... the minute I woke up in the hospital after the surgery I could tell a difference and felt better... the "poison" in my system was gone. My friend who just had surgery said the same thing! Amazing
Misti in Seattle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 12:56 AM   #29  
Senior Member
 
cathyxxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 5,089

S/C/G: 209/179/160

Height: 5'3"

Default

Hey Reba, it's late and I've got to get to bed but I just noticed your message and wanted to post quickly.

I just wanted to mention that a lot of people are finding that their "mental problems" are due to a thyroid problem. It was certainly the case for my son (and many others) as he was placed on psychotropic meds when in fact his thyroid was off and what he needed was thyroid meds. He is much better now thanks to Armour Thyroid. And he doesn't need the other stuff.

There is a lot of good info on the connection between the thyroid and psychiatric problems at:
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com...ema-craziness/

Just thought I would post the link in case you would like to see that info.

take care,
Cathy
cathyxxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2006, 09:41 AM   #30  
Queen of Chaos!
 
mysticvix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Innerleithen, Scottish Borders.
Posts: 196

Default

Just as an alternative view point, here's what the British Thyroid Foundation have to say about Armour:

THE BRITISH THYROID FOUNDATION
Our current views on Armour
The British Thyroid Foundation receives many queries about the use of desiccated thyroid extract. This statement aims to highlight our current position on this issue and inform people of the facts and uncertainties that relate to this treatment.
Armour thyroid is a brand of natural desiccated thyroid extract made by Forest Laboratories in the United States.

Natural desiccated thyroid tablets are made from raw pork thyroid glands collected at slaughterhouses, which are tested for absence of Salmonella and E. Coli, then held in a frozen state until they are delivered to the processing laboratory where they are minced, placed in a vacuum dryer, defatted, then milled to a fine powder before being packaged. Samples are tested for chemical and microbiological characteristics.

The manufacturers state that the following are the ingredients of Armour:

Active ingredients: T3 and T4
Inactive ingredients: calcium state, dextrose, microcrystalline cellulose, sodium starch and opadry white

We have written on several occasions to the manufacturers to ask for confirmation of their ingredients and for details of their quality control procedures but have received no reply to date.

Desiccated thyroid extract is not currently licensed in the UK and was withdrawn from use in the UK in the 1970s after synthetic thyroxine had been developed. At that time there was perceived to be a problem with the quality control of thyroid extract with large variations from batch to batch, due to the variation in T4 (thyroxine) and T3 (triiodothyronine) that it contained.

There is concern amongst some doctors over the substantial fluctuations in T3 levels in blood of patients treated with Armour and the potentially harmful effects on the heart (rapid irregular heart beat which predisposes to clots forming inside the heart and then causing strokes) and bones (osteoporosis).

It is difficult to monitor treatment containing a combination of T3/T4 because of peaks and troughs in T3. The long-term effects of T3, Armour, or combinations of T3 and T4 are not known. T3 has a short half-life of a few hours. Patients on T3 have fluctuating T3 levels and at times these may go beyond the upper limit of normal. By contrast T3 levels in patients on thyroxine are stable. Monitoring thyroid hormone replacement in patients on T4 is easy biochemically because of the stable levels. In someone on T3 or Armour it will depend on the time since the last dose.

The Medicine and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the licensing authority for pharmaceuticals in the UK and executive agency of the Department of Health, states that natural thyroid products including Armour are not currently licensed in the UK. Any hormone preparation would be classed as a medicine in the UK. As a result they can only be marketed if they have been fully assessed for safety, quality and efficacy by the MHRA and granted a marketing authorisation or product licence. The MHRA does not object to importation of desiccated thyroid extract products provided that they are approved by the United States' Food and Drugs Administration (FDA), standardised to the specification of the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP), and that they are authorised, prescription-only medicine for the treatment of patients with thyroid diseases for whom the UK-licensed synthetic thyroid hormones are not suitable. The MHRA says that it is the decision of each individual PCT as to whether an unlicensed product, in this case Armour, be available on NHS prescription or private prescription (MHRA, Jan 2005). If it is prescribed on an NHS prescription, the patient qualifies for medical exemption because the treatment is for hypothyroidism. Being unlicensed in this country, the doctor would be required to take full responsibility for any adverse effects of the treatment.

The Medicines Act makes provision for doctors to prescribe an unlicensed medicine to meet the needs of an individual patient, on their own responsibility, where they judge the benefit to the patient is justified and outweighs the risk of the unlicensed product. Therefore, the prescription of Armour is a question of clinical judgement on the part of each patient's GP. It is the responsibility of NHS Primary Care Trusts to fund supplies of medicines in their area, whether on a trial or permanent basis. Therefore the decision to provide Armour free from prescription charges would be taken by the GP in consultation with the local PCT.

The BTF sees synthetic thyroxine as the current first-line treatment of hypothyroidism. Current medical practice is governed by evidence. There is no known research showing that porcine thyroid extract is superior to synthetic thyroxine. On the contrary, there are good data that life-long treatment with synthetic thyroxine is safe.

The BTF understands that there are concerns about the use of Armour thyroid because of the rapid fluctuations in T3 levels, the difficulties in monitoring such treatment, uncertainties about the long-term health consequences and the considerably higher costs of such treatment.

The major professional thyroid organisations and published peer-reviewed guidelines on treatment of hypothyroidism recommend thyroxine as the treatment of choice for hypothyroidism and our position is in keeping with this view.

We believe that patients who feel unwell on thyroid hormone treatment merit assessment by a qualified, accredited endocrinologist. Such a management pathway will ensure that thyroid hormone replacement is optimal, other causes of symptoms are considered and a meaningful exploration of the potential risks and benefits of unproven therapies such as Armour can be explored.

We do not consider natural thyroid extract to be suitable for everyone but acknowledge that patients for whom synthetic thyroxine is judged not to be suitable on clinical grounds may, together with their doctor, wish to explore treatment with Armour.

We acknowledge that some doctors, acting out of the best possible interests in the well-being of their patients, and basing their judgement on current research evidence, may be reluctant to prescribe Armour.

Much of the debate about the use of Armour relates to individual accounts of patients who are convinced that switching from thyroxine to Armour has transformed their lives. Doctors are equally aware of patients who have found this treatment unhelpful and some have felt worse than on thyroxine. We feel that it is important to keep an open mind about alternative thyroid hormone replacement regimens to thyroxine, but these issues can only be addressed by a properly conducted prospective randomised controlled trial.
mysticvix is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:47 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.