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Old 07-25-2012, 11:13 PM   #3
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Default This is the study from the website...

Clinical, endocrine and metabolic effects of metformin vs N-acetyl-cysteine in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
Oner G, Muderris II.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri, Turkey. [email protected]



To evaluate the clinical, endocrine and metabolic effects of metformin and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).


In this prospective trial, 100 women with PCOS were randomly divided to receive metformin (500 mg p.o. three times daily) or NAC (600 mg p.o. three times daily) for 24 weeks. Hyperandrogenism, lipid profiles, hirsutism scores, menstrual irregularity, insulin sensitivity and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured at baseline and after the treatment period.

Both treatments resulted in a significant decrease in body mass index, hirsutism score, fasting insulin, HOMA index, free testosterone and menstrual irregularity compared with baseline values, and both treatments had equal efficacy. NAC led to a significant decrease in both total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels, whereas metformin only led to a decrease in total cholesterol level. Although TNF-α levels increased following treatment for both groups, the difference from baseline was not significant.


Metformin and NAC appear to have comparable effects on hyperandrogenism, hyperinsulinaemia and menstrual irregularity in women with PCOS. The effects of metformin and NAC on insulin sensitivity are not associated with TNF-α.
Take into consideration that NAC does have side effects, even if they are less common:

Side Effects

N-Acetylcysteine may trigger a number of side effects, including nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. What's more, N-acetylcysteine can increase your levels of homocysteine (an amino acid linked to heart disease). If you're taking N-acetylcysteine, it's important to get your homocysteine levels checked on a regular basis.

In addition, N-acetylcysteine may interact with several drugs (including certain blood pressure medications, medicines that suppress the immune system, cancer drugs and medications that treat chest pain).
Make sure you let someone know you're taking it -- your Endo, your GP, your mom, husband, someone!
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