Salads

Salads
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Spiced Chicken Salad

By 3FC

The Savory Side of Chocolate

By Dana Jacobi for the American Institute for Cancer Research

From a steaming cup of cocoa to brownies and fudge, chocolate is associated so closely with sweets that we rarely think of enjoying its rich flavor in savory dishes. Mole, the dark Mexican sauce famously made with chocolate, is the only non-sweet use of it most people know.

If you’re feeling a bit adventurous, try adding a little cocoa powder to savory dishes for a deeper, richer and subtly complex flavor.

Cocoa powder is made from ground roasted cocoa beans from which some of the fat, called cocoa butter, has been removed. As a result, one tablespoon of cocoa powder contains one-half gram of fat, while a half-ounce of unsweetened chocolate, roughly the equivalent amount for cooking, contains seven grams of fat. Equally important, cocoa imparts more of the floral and earthy notes we love in chocolate, with less of the bitterness found in most unsweetened chocolate, the kind easiest to use in savory dishes. This is particularly true for natural cocoa powder, which is not Dutch-processed.

Dutching involves treating cocoa with alkali to make it easier to dissolve in liquids. It also makes it taste milder. You probably grew up with the most familiar kind, which works perfectly in savory dishes.

Cocoa powder combines nicely with various spices, as you see in the dry rub for the chicken in this salad. Here, cocoa adds a different kind of warmth than cinnamon, plus unexpected depth. This spice blend also gives tomato sauce a new twist that you might enjoy.

Cocoa can be a good salt-substitute, too. Sift it, store it a in a shaker and use a dash to garnish butternut squash, sweet potato, tomato and bean soups, and season sunnyside-up eggs.

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Simple Apple Salad

By 3FC

recipe ingredients 6 cups cubed unpeeled cored apple 1/2 cup raisins 1/3 cup chopped walnuts 1/2 cup vanilla nonfat yogurt…

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Salade Niçoise

By 3FC

Notes:
A Salute To The French Republic

from the American Institute for Cancer Research

July is a month to celebrate independence not just in the United States but in France as well. Bastille Day, on July 14, recognizes the end of the French monarchy and the beginning of a republican nation. So, in the spirit of freedom from tyranny, how about a French meal?

French cuisine does not have to mean a rich dish laden with a heavy cream sauce. A Salade Niçoise is a light, perfect summer entrée as well as a tribute to the French.

Niçoise means, “as prepared in Nice,” referring to the kind of food found in and near that city on the French Riviera. This composed salad contains the basic ingredients of the local cuisine – tomatoes, black olives, garlic and anchovies, plus green beans, onions, tuna, hard-cooked eggs and herbs.

Restaurants often serve this salad with grilled fresh tuna rather than canned fish. It’s good either way. If you use canned tuna, choose the chunk light variety. The solid light and solid white versions are too hard and dry. Canned tuna is packed in either water or oil – the former contains far less fat and calories.

Reports indicate that high concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids are found in fatty fish, particularly tuna and salmon. Studies suggest that these compounds slow or prevent the growth of cancerous tumors, lower cholesterol and decrease blood pressure.

In a composed salad, the ingredients are artfully arranged on a platter rather than tossed together in a bowl. You can start preparing a Niçoise salad a day before serving, but don’t dress the salad until you’re ready to serve it, or the ingredients will wilt and discolor.

This salad is easy to assemble, light, healthful and beautiful to look at. Multiply the ingredients in the following recipe according to the size of your group.

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