How Long to Cook Whole Grains

How Long to Cook Whole Grains

According to the new USDA Pyramid, we should get at least half of our daily grains in the form of whole grains instead of refined. Many whole grains are a mystery to us because we're just not that used to them. Some take a very long time to cook, so if you don't prepare in advance, dinner may be a late night snack. This chart should help make it an easier task, so we can get on to more important things - like eating them!




















Type About this Grain Grain to Water
Ratio
Preparation
Amaranth Sticky texture. 1 C to 3 C Combine rinsed grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 25–30 minutes.
Pearled Barley Use in grain salads, soups, stews and chili. Great as a stuffing for peppers, tomatoes or poultry. Mix with cooked beans and spices for vegetarian "meat loaf". 1 C to 31/2 C Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 60–75 minutes.
Barley Flakes Use like oat flakes. 1 C to 3 C Combine grain with boiling water; add a pinch of salt. Lower heat and simmer 25 minutes or until water is absorbed.
Buckwheat Traditional kasha is made by first toasting in skillet with an egg for extra flavor. Use alone or with other grains, in pilafs, casseroles, stuffings. 1 C to 2 C Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 20 minutes.
Kamut (whole grain) Rich, buttery flavor, with a chewy texture. Great hot or cold as a breakfast grain, marinated in salads, or mixed with rice and beans. 1 C to 3 C Best soaked overnight. Drain after soaking. Combine grain with boiling water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 30–45 minutes, until grains are plump (cooks in 90 minutes if unsoaked).
Kamut Flakes Use like oatmeal. 1 C to 2 C Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 15–20 minutes.
Millet Serve with saut?ed vegetables and beans, as a stuffing, or in soups, stews or risotto. 1 C to 21/2 C Combine grain with boiling water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 20–25 minutes, remove from heat, fluff and let sit covered for 10 minutes. 0ptional: for an extra-nutty flavor, toast millet in a pan without oil before boiling.
Rolled Oats The foundation for hot breakfast cereals and granolas. Use in grain burgers, cookies and quick breads, and as a thickener in soups. 1 C to 2 C Combine grain with boiling water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 15–30 minutes.
Steel Cut Oats Chewy texture. Perfect hot cereal for cold weather breakfasts. 1 C to 4 C Combine grain with water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 30 minutes.
Quinoa Light and chewy with a nutty flavor. Use in grain salads, as a stuffing, in enchiladas or fajitas. Great with salsas and chutneys. 1 C to 2 C Rinse several times before cooking to remove bitter tasting coating. Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. (Optional) For an extra-nutty flavor, toast grain before cooking.
White Rice Varieties include: Basmati, Jasmine, Texmati

Basmati is a hulled long-grain, aromatic rice imported from India. A must for Indian and Middle Eastern Cuisine.
Jasmine is similar to basmati rice — a classic stir-fry accompaniment.
A cross between basmati and long grain American rice. More fluffy, with a milder flavor and aroma than imported basmati.
1 C to 11/2 C Add rinsed grain to boiling water; return to boil; simmer 15–20 minutes; let stand for 5 minutes.
Brown Rice Varieties include: Basmati, Texmati, Long Grain, Medium Grain, Short Grain, Sweet Brown.

Brown rice has a chewier texture than white rice. Long grain brown rice remains separate and fluffy when cooked. Medium grain cooks up stickier than long grain. Both can be used in pilafs, stir-fries, rice salads, and paella, with curried vegetables, or as a side dish with meat, seafood or chicken. Sweet brown rice is a very sticky and chewy rice, good for sushi and puddings.
1 C to 2 C Combine rinsed grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 45 minutes.
Wehani Rice This long grain rice has a red bran layer. Its aroma while cooking is similar to hot buttered popcorn. Chewy and sweet, similar to the flavor of brown Basmati. Combine with a variety of veggies and nuts to create colorful hot dishes and cool salads. 1 C to 2 C Combine rinsed grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 45 minutes.
Wild Rice The seed of aquatic grass. Low in fat and high in B vitamins. Combine with other grains, use with smoked turkey as a salad, or with apples and squash. 1 C to 3 C Combine rinsed grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 60 minutes.
Rye High protein grain with small amount of gluten. High fiber with slowly digesting complex sugars. Use in pilafs and casseroles with other grains, beans, and your choice of seasonings. 1 C to 4 C Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 60 minutes. For softer grain, soak overnight and simmer 2–3 hours.
Spelt Use like wheat, alone or with other grains, in pilafs, casseroles, stuffings, and hot breakfast cereals. 1 C to 3 C Soak 6–8 hours or overnight. Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes. Can also be pressure cooked for 50 minutes (use 1 cup grain to 21/2 cups water). Also cooks well, overnight, in a crock pot.
Spelt Flakes Heated and rolled whole Spelt. Use like rolled oats or kamut flakes. 1 C to 3 C Add rinsed grain to boiling water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 20–25 minutes.
7 Grain Cereal Hearty blend of organic wheat, oats, high beta glucan barley, soy beans, buckwheat, wheat bran, corn, and millet. Primarily used as a breakfast cereal. 1 C : 21/2 C Slowly add grain to salted boiling water, stirring constantly. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Teff Common Ethiopian grain. Sweet and malty flavor. 1 C to 4 C Lightly toast before cooking for a richer flavor. Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 15 minutes.
Wheat Chewy texture. Use in grain salads and side dishes. Good for sprouting. 1 C to 3 C Combine rinsed grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 45–60 minutes. Can also be pressure cooked, with less water, for 50 minutes. For breakfast "congee", use 6 cups water to 1 cup grain, and cook overnight in a crock pot.
Wheat Flakes Heated and rolled whole wheat. Use like rolled oats, spelt or kamut flakes. 1 C to 3 C Combine rinsed grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 30 minutes.
Bulgur Wheat Partially cooked cracked wheat. Quick cooking. Principle ingredient to make tabouli. Mix with nuts and seasonings for stuffings. 1 C to 2 C Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 15–20 minutes. Alternative method: add 1 cup bulgur to 21/2 cups boiling water; cover; remove from burner; let sit for 1 hour.
Couscous Pre-cooked whole-grain or milled wheat, similar to bulgur but lighter in flavor and texture. Quick cooking. Use as a light "bed" for spicy vegetables and stews, or in a risotto with curried vegetables. 1 C to 11/2 C Add to boiling water; add a pinch of salt; simmer for 2 minutes.
Cracked Wheat Wheat berries cracked into small pieces. Use in casseroles with brown rice, in grain salads, or as a stuffing. 1 C to 3 C Combine grain and water; add a pinch of salt; simmer for 25 minutes.