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-   -   why do i need to eat oil? it's gross! (http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/weight-watchers/141292-why-do-i-need-eat-oil-its-gross.html)

maass1981 05-01-2008 11:19 AM

why do i need to eat oil? it's gross!
 
i thought that oil was bad for you and it didn't matter what kind. greasy food is bad right? so how can the 2 tsp of oil. be goo for me? and my leader puts hers in a smothie or oat meal and that just grosses me out!! i have always been told that oil is bad so how do i change my way of thinking now. that is the only good health guidline that i can't understand.:?: can i cook or saute some veggies in it then drain them before i eat it and still count it? and how many points are the two tsp if it is canola oil? that is the only kind of oil i have at home.

fitbyforty 05-01-2008 11:29 AM

2 tsp of oil is not that much.If you cooked veggies in it then I would seriously doubt that there would be any to drain.When I eat a salad I use my regular dressing but add a tsp of oil to it.I don't even notice it is there.Balsamic vinegar and olive oil make a good dressing too.Oil help your skin from being dry improves the health of your hair and nails.Sure too much grease in your diet isn't healthy,otherwise we would all not be here lol.There are a million ways to get that oil in,ones you won't notice.The WW msg boards are free on their site and do a search for getting in the oils and you will find them.
Follow the guidelines that is why they are there.A tsp of oil is 1 point.

pamatga 05-01-2008 11:33 AM

Why you need oil
 
You need oil so you can have shiny hair, protected internal organs and to help you move your bowels. That is why you need oil. The reason why you are disputing this is because you are confusing "bad fats vs good fats". The bad fats are saturated and trans. The good fats are mono-saturated like olive or canola oil.

You can add oil into your diet in other ways than what you have stated. For example, eating salmon is one way of getting the "fatty oils" in your diet without adding anything. Salmon is rich in Omega-3 acids and essential fatty oils. Many cold water fishes are also in this category. You can ask your grocer or team leader to help you choose one you like.

If you use a canola oil spray, you will not have that so called "greasy" feel to your food that you are describing. In fact, all you need is 3 TB per day which is not a lot and if you use 1 per meal you should not be having "greasy" food because it just isn't enough to do that.

If you absolutely can not stand added oil in food preparation, you can take a fish oil capsule that will also give you the recommended amount. I prefer to get my vitamins and minerals via food first before resorting to "pills" but I realize not everyone has the same palate.

Good luck. As for points, I think, 1 TB of oil is 100 calories which I think is 2 points.

Kelly_S 05-01-2008 12:03 PM

Just remember that salmon DOES NOT count toward your 2 servings of healthy oil each day. Additionally the canola or olive oil sprays do not count towards the servings either. No does fills oil capsules count.

Here is an article from W/W on it:

"Healthy Oil
Article by: Leslie Fink, MS, RD


Need ideas for coping with restaurant buffets? Want some good snack ideas? In our Q&A series, WeightWatchers.com nutritionist and food editor Leslie Fink, MS, RD, answers readers' questions about food, nutrition and weight loss.



Q: What is the most healthful oil to use, especially when I am trying to lose weight?

A: Canola and olive oil have stellar nutrition reputations due to their healthy fat profiles: They both contain a high percentage of "good" monounsaturated fat and only a small amount of "bad" saturated fat. But somehow olive oil, in particular, developed a super-food reputation; I've actually heard of people who drink it.

While it is true that olive oil contains a high dose of heart-healthy fat, it contains the same amount of total fat and calories as the badly spoken about coconut oil (that saturated fat monster that sometimes coats movie theater popcorn). In fact, all oils contain 120 calories and 13½ grams of fat per tablespoon. Excessive consumption of any type of oil, therefore, can cause weight gain. It all boils down to moderation.

A look at fast-food French fries illustrates the same point. Fries at certain restaurants may contain less "bad" fats if the restaurant is cooking them in better oil. But they still provide the same huge dose of total fat and the calorie content hasn't changed.

That said, try to choose oils with low saturated fat and high monounsaturated fat contents: olive, canola and peanut oils are your best bets. For the flavor and feel of oil without all the fat and calories, try using nonstick cooking sprays for sautéing, stir-frying, roasting, grilling and coating cookware, pots and pans.

I also recommend the use of highly flavored oils upon occasion. Toasted sesame and hot chili oils provide huge flavor boosts - a little bit of them goes a long way. That's probably the closet thing to "weight loss-friendly" oils that you're going to find."



Here are some tips on how to get it in and a list of what is officially considered per W/W:

Having trouble getting in all your healthy oils? Here are some ideas. You only need to eat 2 tsp of oil per day. (1 teaspoon is a serving). So, you can get it in throughout the day. Healthy oils are: olive oil, canola, sunflower, safflower or flaxseed. FYI: Fish oils, Oil capsules, Avocados, peanut butter, nuts, etc, do NOT count towards WW healthy oils requirements. Only the pourable kinds count.

1) Cook with it, Alot of recipes start off with oil in the skillet
2) Mix up a marinade for meats and/or veggies
3) Mix it with meat sauces, or most sauces
4) Sautee with it.
5) Drizzle over pasta
6) Drizzle over popcorn
7) Drizzle over veggies
8) Drizzle over pizza
9) Drizzle over corn on the cob
10) Drizzle some over fat free cheese(it helps melt better)
11) Mix up some salad dressing (like olive oil and balsamic vinegar)
12) Rub it on poultry or fish before baking it
13) Rub it on meats for the spices and/or rubs have something to stick to
14) Rub some on a baked potato
15) Grill sandwiches
16) Stir Fry veggies
17) Coat some homemade baked fries
18) Makes garlic toast, (oil and garlic on bread toast)
19) Add some to soups
20) Add some to smoothies
21) Mix 2 tsps olive oil to fat-free salad dressing
22) Add to anything that is fat-free. instead of the fat, you're replacing it with healthy oils
23) Roast veggies with oil
24) Mix canola oil to oatmeal, yogurt, smoothies, soups
25) put some in salsa
26) If you eat frozen dinners, drizzle some over it.
27) Make some Herb or Spice Infused Oil, (for dipping or cooking)
28) Mix in some Butter Buds or Molly McButter, you'll have butter flavored oils.
29) Mix some in the new PB2 peanut butter flour that alot are trying. (you're replacing the fat with healthy oils)

I will say that 2 tsp of canola in my skim milk every morning is not even noticiable. The only time I don't put it in my milk is if I know I am grilling or stirfrying or pan frying meat/veggies later in the day.

Kelly_S 05-01-2008 12:06 PM

Additionally it helps your skin and hair and nails stay healthy; it helps retain the elasticity in your skin; it keeps you fuller longer; it helps your gastro track process your food and run smoothly; you need it to process oil soluable vitamins.

the slim me 05-01-2008 12:07 PM

There are lots of ways to get the "good oils". All flax seed oil or olive oil to the list of the good ones. If you cook with it you should get enough, no problem. Today I am making baby red potaoes cut into chunks and rolled in olive oil and onion soup mix. Add some garlic to the mix too if you like it. put them in a pan and roast untill done. They are soooo good! Salmon is also a good alternative, like mentioned above. So good grilled.

I understand your aversion to fat. I don't like my food greasy and I don't like butter.

OnceUponADrive 05-01-2008 12:10 PM

I take a tablespoon of flaxseed oil every morning straight and just chase it with a big mouthful of orange juice. It's not the best tasting thing in the world but I've noticed a big difference since I started taking it.

maass1981 05-01-2008 12:31 PM

Thanks
 
Thank You Ladies For All Of The Tips. Thanks Also Kelly For The Article It Was Very Helpful. I Am Going To Try My Best To Get Them In.

happy2bme 05-01-2008 12:51 PM

I second the thank you for the article Kelly - that was very informative and I didn't realize that it's just the pourable oil - not the oil rich foods that count.

kaplods 05-01-2008 02:01 PM

From a nutritional point of view, I find it very odd that oils in foods "don't count." I'm not aware of a scientific, nutritional difference between the oil in a handful of sunflower seeds, and the oil extracted from the seeds. It's the same stuff.

Though maybe if they counted fats in foods, they'd have to up the amount of fats recommended, as healthy fats are a vital part of the diet. You can actually die if your diet is too low in fat (such as in the case of rabbit starvation, a diet high in protein, but low in carbohydrates and fat, which got it's name from the american settlers that died trying to to exist on only rabbit during the wagontrails west).

Princess0113 05-01-2008 06:02 PM

i use Kraft light salad dressings that say they are made with olive oil (the fat free kind doesn't have it but the light does). i've been counting that towards my HG's. is that ok? i'm not sure exactly how much oil is in a serving of the dressing, but a serving of the dressing (2 tbsp) is 1 point so i've been counting that as one of my daily oils.

Kelly_S 05-02-2008 01:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Princess0113 (Post 2180423)
i use Kraft light salad dressings that say they are made with olive oil (the fat free kind doesn't have it but the light does). i've been counting that towards my HG's. is that ok? i'm not sure exactly how much oil is in a serving of the dressing, but a serving of the dressing (2 tbsp) is 1 point so i've been counting that as one of my daily oils.

Actually for the reason you stated it doesn't count. Because you don't know how much you need to get in that tsp for each serving. I'm not saying you can't but officially W/W doesn't allow it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by kaplods (Post 2179981)
From a nutritional point of view, I find it very odd that oils in foods "don't count." I'm not aware of a scientific, nutritional difference between the oil in a handful of sunflower seeds, and the oil extracted from the seeds. It's the same stuff.

It has to do with figuring out how much you actually would need to equal the 1 tsp.

aarron 05-17-2008 09:47 PM

You can buy oil sprayers that make using oil much easier. It is also more natural than using those yucky chemical sprayers (Pam, etc). You just keep refilling them with your oil of choice.


Also keep in mind that certain oils loose their best quailities when heated. One example is olive oil. It looses alot of it nutritional value when heated, so to get it's full benefit is better to use it in dressings or to spritz on after baking for flavor. Canola and sesame on the other hand can tolerate higher heat.

Kelly_S 05-18-2008 01:44 PM

Quote:

You can buy oil sprayers that make using oil much easier. It is also more natural than using those yucky chemical sprayers (Pam, etc). You just keep refilling them with your oil of choice.
The chemical Sprays such as Pam are not qualifying the healthy oil requirement either. And be sure you know how may sprays the oil sprays such as a Mr. Misto has to get to that 1 tsp.


Quote:

Also keep in mind that certain oils loose their best quailities when heated. One example is olive oil. It looses alot of it nutritional value when heated, so to get it's full benefit is better to use it in dressings or to spritz on after baking for flavor. Canola and sesame on the other hand can tolerate higher heat.
Will olive oil loses its nutritional value when heated ?
Olive oil, when heated at high temperature, will cause its alcohols and esters to evaporate. The esters are what make up the olive oil delicate taste and fragrance. So heat will only change the flavor of olive oil but not its nutritional contents. We recommend you use a cheaper olive oil like refined/light oil for frying and then add a more flavorful olive oil after cooking.

WebRover 05-18-2008 04:50 PM

Kelly_S - do you remember where you got the information about the heated olive oil? I know somewhere along the line - years ago - after reading which oils could be heated and which couldn't, I decided it would just be easier to always use olive oil as it was, cold or heated, always a good choice. Recently someone challenged that saying that olive oil changed upon heating. Your information matches what I had originally understood and I would love to find the source of the information.

Thanks - WebRover


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