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The cost of bottled water

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Old 08-10-2007, 09:31 AM   #31
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I'm not trying to play devil's advocate here, and really don't know a lot about the topic. But I'm guessing it costs somebody something to take the water from where it's stored, and do all the things they have to do to make it safe to drink. Somebody has to pay for that, so why should it be free?
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Old 08-10-2007, 10:49 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LLV View Post
I understood your point

Water SHOULD be a free resource.

But nooooooooo, they gotta make money off of that, too.
Further thought: when you pay a municipal water bill, you're paying for the city providing the services of 1. filtering the water and 2. delivery in the form of plumbing, if not for the actual water. So I do recognize that even city water isn't free, but the only way you're going to get truly free water is if you have a private well or a rain collection system or if you get it in jugs from a lake or stream, and even then you have to invest in the apparatus to collect and filter it. But bottled water is still overpriced, and when it's just city water it's a big. fat. ripoff.

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Old 08-10-2007, 11:05 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by wyllenn View Post
I'm not trying to play devil's advocate here, and really don't know a lot about the topic. But I'm guessing it costs somebody something to take the water from where it's stored, and do all the things they have to do to make it safe to drink. Somebody has to pay for that, so why should it be free?
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Originally Posted by ANOther View Post
Further thought: when you pay a municipal water bill, you're paying for the city providing the services of 1. filtering the water and 2. delivery in the form of plumbing, if not for the actual water. So I do recognize that even city water isn't free, but the only way you're going to get truly free water is if you have a private well or a rain collection system or if you get it in jugs from a lake or stream, and even then you have to invest in the apparatus to collect and filter it. But bottled water is still overpriced, and when it's just city water it's a big. fat. ripoff.
Yep, good points, and I agree with both posts.
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Old 08-11-2007, 07:21 PM   #34
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I own a Pur water pitcher. The water at my University tastes and smells iffy--but it smells/tastes great after being filtered through the pitcher. I like to buy 1.5 liter water bottles and re-fill them using the Pur pitcher until the bottles are unusable, then I replace them. I tend to tote a full 1.5 liter bottle with me most places I go
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Old 08-12-2007, 01:56 AM   #35
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I filter thru my fridge, but use bottles on the go or at kid's sports for them. We recycle all our plastic bottles - is this not done across the US routinely? I started recycling as part of household pickup in 1990, before then it was a voluntary separate process. I guess it must not be everywhere, bc I remember a guest on Oprah gushing about going green, bc she recycles everything - like it was new! Heck, here we've been doing plastic, aluminum, newspapers, cereal boxes - they even take newspapers and phone books here and we don't have to sort it out - we can comingle.
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Old 08-12-2007, 11:31 AM   #36
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We have commingled recycling too. It's great. I remember recycling as a kid and we had separate bins for everything, and the cans had to be crushed... it was a lot of work for my mom. And she had to take it somewhere to recycle it. Now I just throw it all (paper, plastic, cans) in the same place it on the curb once a week and that's it.
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Old 08-15-2007, 11:35 AM   #37
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Even if you recycle, plastics can only be recycled twice and then they end up in an incinerator, landfill or the ocean according to this book I read called "garbageland". Manufacturers don't like to use recycled plastic because the virgin stuff is cheaper, plentiful and easier to work with. Paper can be recycled up to eight times, much less if it has inks on it. We can expect to see the last of the virgin forest (there's that word again) disappear in our lifetimes except for a few museum type groves that are protected. This would be the forest that once covered north america, unmolested since the time the glaciers receded. People think there are a lot of primal forests around, but it isn't true. Most all of it has been burned, logged, replanted by the white man since his arrival on the continent. When a paper company says that it replants the primal forests that it mows down, they mean that they replant the species of tree they are interested in harvesting. Essentially they create toilet paper farms, monocultures where once there was a thriving and diverse eccosystem. They don't have any patience for slow growing trees or animal life that depends on it.

Plastics never really decay. They break up into smaller bits of plastic which are eventually eaten by tiny life forms. The plastic then becomes part of their bodies. Those lifeforms are then eaten by bigger lifeforms. Eventually we eat the fish and animals that are full of plastics and our own bodies become made up of it. Humans today already have hundreds of plastic molecules in our bodies that didn't even exist a hundred years ago. Nobody really knows what effect these foreign substances have on us.

There are plastics made of vegetable matter that do break down in two months or so, but they don't do well in high temperatures and they're more expensive. For that reason, manufacturers don't use them. Their theft preventing bubble packs might melt in the truck on the way to Walmart. Rather than risk the ruin of some product they subject us all to a hundred thousand years of plastic that doesn't degrade.

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Old 08-15-2007, 02:31 PM   #38
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Live in the country? You probably know someone who burns their trash in a barrel. Cops usually don't pay any attention and the people who do it just figure it's a little smoke. The truth is those barrels burn at a relatively low temperature that's perfect for creating dioxins. Three days of household trash from one family burned in a barrel creates as much dioxin as 200 tons of trash burned in a modern community incinerator. Got that from a book called, "The Secret Life of Dust". Oh yeah. I'm well read!
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Old 08-15-2007, 04:11 PM   #39
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I found the add I was talking about. If the plastic bottle has a 1 in the recycling triangle, it's one use only. If it has a 2 or 5, it's reusable. 5 is better. Mine has a 7 so I'm assuming that's better than even a 5. Also, it said if you get any bottle that's dented or damaged, throw it away or return it. Or don't buy it. Cause damaged plastics, especially 1s, are more liable to leak chemicals back into the water even worse. Just some info from a magazine article.
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Old 08-15-2007, 04:26 PM   #40
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Remember how everything was in glass. Could be used over and over and everything tasted better that came in glass instead of plastic.
Word! I'm old enough to remember that after we finished our bottles of pop (16-oz bottles in 6- or 8-packs) we returned them to the store
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Old 08-15-2007, 05:34 PM   #41
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I actually stopped drinking bottled water because of this thread. I always just bought a case and refilled all the bottles with tap when I was done, until I eventually recycled (or tossed) them (I was out w/ it and didn't want to carry the empty bottle; it got bent up; I lost the lid; whatever). I assumed because I used them many times it wasn't so horrible - I do, of course, recycle everything I can. But I never knew plastic doesn't break down! That's insane to me! I'm done with water bottles. I'll just fill a thermos/sports bottle and deal with carrying it, if that's the cost otherwise!!!!
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Old 08-16-2007, 11:33 PM   #42
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Yes, we have a family that tries to burn (our small development used to be a vacant lot that the owner sold). We were one of the first around and i have VERY bad allergies and asthma, and while some people just "smell" that stuff, both that and fireplace emissions make my skin crawl and make me really really uncomfortable - like sick almost. We called 911 bc the first time we could tell where the flame was coming from, and we really thought the house was on fire. With county-arranged trash pickup, who really needs to burn anymore? They sent the firetruck out! They've done it twice more and other people called and the f/t came down our street again. I guess they got tired of the fines they fd levied, and they've finally stopped. Now I just wish everyone would convert to gas burning fireplaces.... When I lived in Colo,. we actually had no-burning days and they gave state tax credits for converting, and new construction either could only, or was strongly encouraged to only install gas f/p. I know some people love the smell and pop, but it's really bad for the air quality too.

Didn't know that about limited recyclying on plastics. Yes, I remember the metal screw off top glass bottles from the 80's. I had forgotten about those......
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Old 08-18-2007, 03:48 PM   #43
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I love the smell and pop of a fire. I also used to enjoy burning trash in the barrel when I was a kid. Lots of people did it back then and we all felt we were just saving the garbageman some trouble.

More dust factoids from "The Secret Life of Dust".

Talcum powder is made of stone. Women who use it have a better chance of getting ovarian cancer. It also causes lung problems and has killed babies on rare occasions. I think the baby has to have asthma or something to start with. Cornstarch based powders are recomended as a substitute.

The biggest creator of dust in the world is.... oceans. Everytime there are whitecaps water gets sprayed into the air and some of the droplets collide and become an even finer mist that evaporates while in the air except for the salt. The result is salty air. It didn't say if salty air had significant enough amounts of salt to affect people who are stroke prone, but the salt is absorbed by the human body. It's relatively harmless. Stone dust often causes silicosis.

Cats and babies eat a lot of dust. They're all found on carpeting. Cats of course lick themselves clean so they're at serious risk in a house with old lead paint that's breaking down into dust. Pesticides that breakdown outdoors tend to last for ages indoors. Another hazard for things that crawl on the floor and put things in their mouths.

Suspect in rising asthma rates is that kids aren't as active. With the advent of computers, we've finally found a way to keep them still. Poor kids back in the days of everyone burning coal were often healthier than they are today. The chinese still cook with unventilated coal indoors. Women there have a lot of problems with their lungs as a result of that and stir fry cooking. They have more problems than heavy smokers do over here even though it's rare for chinese women to smoke.
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Old 08-18-2007, 07:03 PM   #44
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I actually stopped drinking bottled water because of this thread. I always just bought a case and refilled all the bottles with tap when I was done, until I eventually recycled (or tossed) them (I was out w/ it and didn't want to carry the empty bottle; it got bent up; I lost the lid; whatever). I assumed because I used them many times it wasn't so horrible - I do, of course, recycle everything I can. But I never knew plastic doesn't break down! That's insane to me! I'm done with water bottles. I'll just fill a thermos/sports bottle and deal with carrying it, if that's the cost otherwise!!!!
YAY!!!!
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Old 01-19-2009, 12:26 AM   #45
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I just had to post when I read folks are encouraging fluoride! Please be very careful about giving advice on such matters. When I hear lay persons advising fluoride water is ok it worries me because I have studied and researched fluoride and fluoridated water and what I have read and uncovered as led me to not allow this to pass my lips. Caution is also need with bottled water however most do not contain fluoride and if they do it naturally occurring not the waste by-product from the aluminium industry that is added to our water supplies.

Understand that there is naturally occurring fluoride and then there is the waste-by-product from the aluminium industry which is added without our consent to our municipal water (drinking water). There is no evidence or proof that fluoride works just very carefully written reports.

Research shows that mother knows best and breast is best! Did you know that when you give your child just one glass of water you are giving them an overdose of in organic fluoride at over 250 times that which is in breast milk? Keep in mind that Alzheimer in way out of control and it just so happens that all these cases when the brain is autopsied clearly shows large amounts of aluminium - where did it come from???? I could go on and on but please think twice.

Aluminium in our brains? Where does it come from... follow the bread crumbs! Follow the trail!

Visit

Fluoride Action Network: www dot fluoridealert dot org - Dr Paul Connett is a retired Phd who spend most of his time researching and actively protesting agsint fluoridation. He has amassed hundreds of documentation to suggest we need to do more research before adding and chemical or in organic substance to our food chain.

Here is a recent interview with him on One Radio Network where he talks in detail about some measure we can take and also explains why to proceed with much caution. www dot oneradionetwork dot com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=722

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