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Old 05-28-2005, 02:54 AM   #1
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Hi. Has anyone every tried the Boxing Diet? I first heard of it when I was watching the hit NBC reality TV Show “The Contender”. One of the boxing contestants had to lose 6 pounds in a day in order to be qualified to compete in a boxing match. He lost the pounds and it was amazing. I was reading about the Boxing Diet online at Yahoo and was wondering if anyone besides boxers has tried it? Thank you.

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Old 05-28-2005, 03:20 AM   #2
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It would have to be water weight loss and not fat. Consider that you must burn 3,500 calories to lose one pound of fat, so you would have to burn 21,000 calories to lose 6 pounds of fat.

If you are a 170 lb woman, you would have to run for one hour to burn around 600 calories (example), or run nonstop for 35 hours.

Losing water, however, is much easier. Depending on what you eat, you could also clean out your bowels. There you go - 6 pounds in one day lost. Two days later, it's right back where it was. That's why going on a program that causes quick water loss is a waste of time. It's best to concentrate on losing fat.

A lot of people here have done the quick weight loss diet fads, such as the cabbage soup diet, and they learn just as quickly that the best way to lose it and keep it off is through a balanced diet and exercise program. The safe rate of weight loss is just one or two pounds per week.

Good luck
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Old 05-28-2005, 03:23 AM   #3
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Well I replied to your question on the boxing diet I moved it out of the UK forum since they would not be familiar with the tv show and channel you mentioned.
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Old 05-28-2005, 03:30 AM   #4
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Is there anyway to maintain the weight loss after applying the Boxing Diet? And is it a diet that you can use every so often while applying another regualr diet?
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Old 05-28-2005, 03:55 AM   #5
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Not really, since it's just water weight and not fat. All you have to do is eat and drink something and your body will try to replenish the lost water. We need some water, and if you follow a diet like this too often, you can make yourself ill.

I'm saying this as just a guess, I'm not familiar with the Boxing Diet. I found two websites that mentioned a Boxing Diet and each one was vastly different from the other. They were both too low in calories to be healthy. One was down right scary because it also said you should put on a sauna suit and rub something on your skin to make you sweat excessively. It sounded dangerous.

If you are following a regular, balanced diet, there's really no need to try to drop a few pounds of water. You'll see the fat gradually disappear, and you won't care about the water.

Besides, water is good for our skin, internal organs, and even helps keep us regular There's no good reason to try to drop it, unless you have a serious health condition that causes water retention, and your doctor recommends it.
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Old 05-28-2005, 02:11 PM   #6
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Thanks. I really appreciate the advice. I’ll start following a regular, balanced diet and stop trying to find easy way out. But as far as the sauna suit, I watched a boxer on The Contender put on black sauna suits to lose the weight. However, it did not make him ill. Matter of fact, the boxer won his five-round-fight the next day. How safe is sweating out weight?
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Old 05-28-2005, 02:19 PM   #7
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It is dangerous to wear such suits, especially while exercising! You risk dehydration, throwing your electrolytes out of balance and worse! Please be smart about weight loss and dieting- eat enough calories from a variety of nutrient-dense foods, drink plenty of water, exercise wisely and love yourself during the process!
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Old 05-28-2005, 02:42 PM   #8
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Thanks for the advice. I don’t want you to think I am going to do dangerous things to my body to lose weight. I was asking about the Boxing Diet because I watched the boxer on the contender lose put on a black sauna suit, lost 8 pounds in day and knockout his opponent in a boxing match using the Boxing Diet. I m not saying I would follow the Boxing diet. I was just asking for opinions. Here’s a link to the NBC website showing pictures and explaining a little of what the boxer went through to lose the weight.

http://nbc.com/nbc/The_Contender/epi....shtml#gallery

Click on the EPISODE RECAP "ARROW" to the right on the webpage read to explain all.

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Old 05-28-2005, 03:00 PM   #9
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I think the question you really have to ask yourself here is, "Do I want to lose weight, or do I want to lose fat?"

You can lose water and muscle fairly easily, but these are things your body needs to stay healthy. If you lose these, it will in the long run make losing fat harder. Losing these is not a short cut to losing fat, no matter what you might see on tv. A well trained athelete might be able to handle the stress of losing water and muscle over the short run, but I would bet anything they work very hard to recover from this after their training is over.

If you lose muscle, you will lower your metabolism because a pound of muscle burns more calories than a pound of fat does. If you lose water, you will gain it back rapidly because you will sooner or later drink enough fluids to restore the fluid levels of your body into proper balance.

If you want to lose fat, which is the way to achieve lasting results, you have to eat less, and it really really helps to move more.
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Old 05-28-2005, 03:24 PM   #10
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So you're saying the Boxing Diet gives you temporary results, but a weel-balanced diet which cuts out fat and not water is more lasting. Gotchya.
It's intereting that they have a special deisgn suit to purposely make the body sweat.
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Old 05-28-2005, 04:18 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guerilladiet
It's intereting that they have a special deisgn suit to purposely make the body sweat.
Just because it was shown on a tv show, doesn't make it valid or safe thing to do. Does the name Johnny Knoxville ring a bell? Those things have been around in various forms for several decades. But look around, America is fatter than ever, so they obviously haven't helped However, they were never used in the manner suggested by the boxing show. People generally put one on while they washed the car or something, then were delighted that they lost 3 pounds the next morning. Then they ate an apple and had a cup of coffee and their bodies soaked the water back up like a sponge. Why bother? Plus, you can gain and lose that same 3+ pounds of water every day. If you are not dieting and exercising to burn off the fat, you will never get any thinner.


Listen, it can be very dangerous. Please put it out of your mind. What you are considering doing can cost you your life. Here is a very interesting and important article by Vanderbilt University on this very issue:

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/psycho...-Wrestling.htm

Quote:
What do Billy Saylor (19 years old) at Campbell University in North Carolina, Joseph LaRosa (22) at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, and Jeff Reese (21) at the University of Michigan all have in common? They are all dead now, victims of one of the ghastly secrets of college wrestling. All three boys were engaged in dehydrating practices trying to lose weight in order to qualify for their first college-wrestling matches. Reese was trying to lose 17 pounds so that he could wrestle in the 150-pound weight class. His two-hour workout in a rubber suit in a 92-degree room cost him his life. He died of rhabdomyolysis -- a cellular breakdown of skeletal muscle under conditions of excessive exercise, which, combined with dehydration, resulted in kidney failure and heart malfunction (Iowa Gazette - December 22, 1997). LaRosa was also riding a stationary bike and wearing a rubber suit when he collapsed and died. Saylor was riding a stationary bike in a predawn workout when he suffered a heart attack (Washington Post - January 14, 1998).

Physicians are of the consensus that excessive dehydration as a means to lose weight can harm bodily functions, possibly leading to kidney failure, heat stroke or a heart attack. Why then do the wrestlers engage in these dangerous activities? Legendary University of Iowa wrestling coach Dan Gable had this to say in an ESPN report:
"They (wrestlers) think they are indestructible. But I’ll tell you what -- those three athletes thought they were indestructible, too. And they aren’t around to talk about it."Wrestlers believe that it is mind over body; they can accomplish anything and nothing bad will ever happen to them. So, LaRosa’s behavior on that fatal day in November wasn’t anything out of the ordinary for many college wrestlers. He was wearing sweats over a rubber suit and riding a stationary bike in a steam-filled shower room. His body temperature reached 108 degrees. He was trying to make weight for his match the next day, and wrestling’s rules did little to discourage such dangerous practices. The logic in wrestling is to make the lowest weight you can in the weigh-ins, which are 24 hours before the match. Then you can replenish and rehydrate your body over the course of the 24 hours between the weigh-in and the match. This will give you an advantage in the competition because you really will be bigger and stronger then most of the wrestlers in that lower weight class.
Is it worth it?
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Old 05-28-2005, 06:21 PM   #12
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If you live in a very hot climate as I do, you KNOW what a combination of dehydration and high heat can do to the body within an extremely short time. Many, many people, including young athletes, firefighters, etc., have died not realizing the dangers of not taking the proper precautions and exercising in the heat ... or people fall asleep in enclosed places and die that way, not realizing the danger.

Don't even think about abusing your body like this!

As Suzanne says, "Is it worth it?"

What could be worth more than your life? Why risk it?
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Old 05-28-2005, 06:42 PM   #13
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Two weeks ago a college rower died from heart failure after winning his race in the Dad Vail Regatta in Philadelphia, probably from exertion after "making weight" in the lightweight division. Last weekend, 2 highschool rowers were hospitalized with heart attacks after races in the Stotesbury Regatta where they had had to run several miles in sweat suits to make weight in their divisions. This is a huge problem in sports with weight classes. Please don't do it to yourself voluntarily!

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Old 05-29-2005, 11:07 AM   #14
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If you want to see another view of the hazards of 'sweating off the weight' check out a documentary that was on HBO recently (if you have "HBO On Demand" check the documentary listings...I notice it was listed for May) titled Jockey. Most "race riders" HAVE to do daily purging, starving, sweating in order to 'make weight' to ride.

The synopsis on HBO states:

Quote:
JOCKEY follows the lives of three dedicated riders as they cope with the twists and turns of the intense - and often life-threatening - demands of their profession. Punctuated by footage of dramatic moments in recent horse racing history, this startling America Undercover documentary debuts just days before all eyes are on the Kentucky Derby.

While a few jockeys do make millions a year, many riders struggle to earn a living, and even the biggest names will do anything to make minimum required weight.

Through the stories of these three courageous jockeys from three generations, JOCKEY reveals some well kept secrets of professional horse racing, showing how impossibly low weight minimums have spawned a culture of forced starvation, sweating and purging among riders. Adding to the stress of the job, jockeys are not generally signed to contracts and have little job security or health coverage.

All three jockeys featured in JOCKEY express a deep passion for and commitment to the sport, despite the hardships. Sellers, once ranked the third-leading rider in the U.S., has been sidelined by a racing accident and is now working to shed 22 pounds to get back in the saddle. For Rosier, who is a struggling apprentice jock, or "bugboy," a successful racing career may offer an exciting escape from an impoverished life. And after years of competition, legendary jockey Romero suddenly faces death as a result of 20 years of bulimia and riding injuries.

While Sellers is preparing a comeback from his knee injury, he is wary of the lifestyle of the jockey community, where weight obsession runs rampant. "People don't know what riders go through," he observes. "It's a secret. It's a kept secret."

Many racetracks even have specially designed "heaving bowls" in the locker rooms. Rosier describes marathon sessions in the sauna, or "hot box," to lose water weight before getting on a scale to qualify for the race, revealing that "yesterday, I sweated six pounds [to make weight]. I know people who have sweated 11 pounds before a race. This happens every day."

"Keeping your body weight at 106 - 108 pounds stripped soaking wet -- takes its toll," comments Romero. His accident at the 1990 Breeders Cup illustrates the potential for tragedy. The racing icon was riding Go for Wand when the filly broke down in front of 50,000 spectators, but this was only one of 23 major accidents he has suffered. During the filming of JOCKEY, his body reaches a breaking point and he is hospitalized for kidney and liver failure, a dire situation complicated by the fact that Romero, like most jockeys, has no health insurance. "If a baseball player gets hurt, he has a contract. If that happens to a rider, you're just done," notes Sellers, who has spearheaded fundraising efforts to help with Romero's rising medical costs.

This unhealthy attempt to lose weight quickly often leaves riders fatigued and weak before a race -- a dangerous situation for diminutive men and women who ride atop 1200-pound horses racing at speeds of more than 40 miles per hour.

The film has a bittersweet ending, as some racetracks move to raise their weight minimums for the first time, due in part to the efforts of Shane Sellers. This will help young jockeys like Rosier, but unfortunately comes too late for Romero, who is still fighting for his life.
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