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Warrior Diet

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Old 05-21-2004, 09:07 AM   #1
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Default Warrior Diet

Hi Everyone,

Has anyone tried the Warrior Diet? It was featured in First magazine this week and claims to take off 5lbs/wk. I'm wondering if anyone has experience with it.

Thanks!

Sarah
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Old 05-21-2004, 11:47 AM   #2
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I HAVE heard of this diet. Basically, you starve yourself all day, and then eat your one meal at night.

Personally, that's how *I* got obese in the first place - when you're STARVING, it's really, really tough to make good food choices. Any nutritionist worth his or her salt will tell you that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. And I'm a big fan of eating 5-6 small meals spaced throughout the day - because that's what has worked for me.

Apparently, the guy who thought this whole thing up is the editor of Penthouse magazine - and a bodybuilder (that doesn't necessarily mean he knows what he's talking about though).

Back in 1998, Testosterone Magazine published an interview with this guy, so it's not exactly 'new'. (Since First Magazine is one of those tabs that seem to have a new miracle diet on their cover every freakin' week, I'd say that they have their researchers working overtime, searching the 'net for 'new' diets.)

Here's a synopsis of the diet...
Quote:
The Warrior Diet

Synopsis: Man, this one got people excited. We've received more e-mails about this diet than any other diet we've posted at T-mag. The diet was written by the editor of the now defunct Mind and Muscle Power magazine, Ori Hofmekler.

Here's the skinny: Don't eat all day long. Workout in the evening, then come home and stuff yourself with just about anything you want, just like the romantic warriors did it in olden times. Oh, there's a lot of talk about warriors, instincts, and anthropology, but that's the gist of it.

The concept flies in the face of so many of bodybuilding's accepted maxims, that the diet was either going to be revolutionary or a total flop. Among other things, this one-meal-a-day plan is supposed to stretch your glycogen reserves, increase your sensitivity to insulin and boost your protein efficiency.

Reader Feedback: Very mixed. About half who tried it said it was a failure. The other reported fat loss and really liked the convenience of not worrying about eating all day. We received no feedback that I can remember concerning muscle gains during this diet.

Conclusion: This one is a coin toss. Try it at your own peril.
And a sample day of this diet...
Quote:
Testosterone's Guide to the Warrior Diet
By Tim Patterson

I don't like a lot of complicated instructions. Stuff like that really makes me mad and prevents me from getting involved. So, after analyzing the Warrior Diet, I've put together a simple guide on how to get started. Now, this is my interpretation of the program.

The Warrior diet is based upon two extreme phases: overeating and undereating. And you cycle between the two phases each day. Normally, I'd recommend that you take a break from dieting one or two days a week. But I don't think you'll need to do that with the Warrior diet because cycling between the extreme phases keeps your body from adapting to the program. Also, the overeating phase will take care of your desire to binge.


Undereating phase:
Breakfast to 7pm


Breakfast
• Neurotransmitter boost—Power Drive, one serving
• Glutamine, ten grams
• Metabolic support—Thermadrol or Ripped Fuel, one capsule

9am
• Glutamine, five grams

Noon
• Protein shake—Two scoops of Grow! mixed with five grams of glutamine
• Metabolic support—Thermadrol or Ripped Fuel, one capsule

3pm
• Protein shake—Two scoops of Grow! mixed with five grams of glutamine

30 minutes before workout
• Neurotransmitter boost—Power Drive, one serving
• Glutamine, five grams
• Metabolic support—Thermadrol or Ripped Fuel, one capsule


Workout:
6pm to 7pm



Overeating phase:
7pm to one hour before bedtime


Dinner 1
• Large lettuce salad with raw, low-glycemic vegetables
• Protein, one to two pounds of lean beef, chicken, fish, etc.
• Steamed vegetables (any kind)
• Brown or wild rice
• Fresh fruit (optional)
• For seasoning, use two to three teaspoons of any good oil (olive, safflower, EFA), spices, lemon juice, tomato sauce, etc.
• Eat until full

Dinner 2 (one hour later)
If you're still hungry, go for it! Eat anything you want. Really! You've tempered the effects of what you're going to eat during the second meal because you ate the right stuff in the first dinner. Be honest with yourself, though; if you're stuffed, don't gorge yourself some more. Try eating whatever you have a pang for, too, like pizza, ice cream, even candy. Of course, if you want to, you can be a wuss and make it nonfat frozen yogurt or stewed tomatoes, poached tofu, etc.

Dinner 3 (one hour later)
Once again, if you're still hungry, be my guest. If you can make it this far, you're a bottomless pit. Repeat the recommendations spelled out for the second dinner, and then pass out. The following day, buy a toga and start wearing sandals, because you're one step away from becoming one of those Romans who eats 'till the point of bursting, vomits it all out, and eats again until the slave chicks can't find any more food.

Bedtime
• Glutamine, ten grams
This definitely would NOT work for me - I'd be DEAD at work without my breakfast and my 10 am protein shake, while at the same time I'd eat myself up to 200 pounds within a matter of months - remember I said that was how I got obese in the first place - not eating anything during the day and then binging on anything that wasn't nailed down at night! I wouldn't recommend it to anyone else either. (Keep in mind that T-Mag is written primarily for MALE bodybuilders, who can take a bit more abuse than us gals can, calorie-wise).

Hopefully some of our Ladies who Lift will chime in here...
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Old 05-21-2004, 01:38 PM   #3
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Amen, MrsJim! You always do such good research!

It's also scary how much supplementing goes on with this. Shouldn't most of your nutrition come from your FOOD? I think anything that requires you to buy a bunch of specialty products to be successful is not a good plan.
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Old 05-21-2004, 02:40 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarPrincess
Amen, MrsJim! You always do such good research!

It's also scary how much supplementing goes on with this. Shouldn't most of your nutrition come from your FOOD? I think anything that requires you to buy a bunch of specialty products to be successful is not a good plan.
Aww...

Wasn't really research - I read this article like four years ago and it came to mind IMMEDIATELY when I saw the post

You're right about the supps, but it's good to keep in mind that both articles are from T-Mag, which is owned by Biotest (a supplement company - many fitness mags are published by supp companies...) so of course they're going to push supplements BIG TIME...
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*LIVING at: 145-149 pounds, size 4/6 (-116/120 lbs)

*Maintenance = LIVING.
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Old 05-21-2004, 02:54 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsJim
good to keep in mind that both articles are from T-Mag, which is owned by Biotest (a supplement company - many fitness mags are published by supp companies...) so of course they're going to push supplements BIG TIME...
There's an excellent lesson right there!

Know who 'owns' the supplier of information before you take it as truth.
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Old 05-21-2004, 05:18 PM   #6
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Thanks Mrs. Jim! The rational side of me says this diet is utterly ridiculous, but I can't help getting sucked in by the diet tabloids I guess I just needed to hear it from someone else!
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Old 07-04-2004, 12:07 PM   #7
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Thumbs up The Warrior Diet can be misunderstood...

Quote:
Originally Posted by soontobegoneforgood
Hi Everyone,

Has anyone tried the Warrior Diet? It was featured in First magazine this week and claims to take off 5lbs/wk. I'm wondering if anyone has experience with it.

Thanks!

Sarah
Hi!
I'm new here but I felt I had to reply to your post. I have been on the warrior diet for almost 7 months and I feel great. You DO NOT STARVE yourself on it. Those who say that have not read the book or they misunderstood it. Actually you eat very healthy on this plan. The "coles notes" on it is you eat light healthy natural foods during the day ( raw fruit, veggies, plain yogurt) and your main meal is at night. This way your body will be forced to burn your stored stubborn fat as fule rather than the bagle you ate at lunch time Ha! I went to a Warrior Diet seminar in L.A. on the 23rd of June and Ori (the author) is bang on! I am more alert all day due to controled blood sugar levels (no more mid day slump) and though the inital few workouts were a bit lax in energy my body adapted and now I love the feeling I have knowing all day I am burning off fat for fuel!!!! Please check it out carefully yourself before you close the door. I am so SICK of low carb crap! Your body needs carbs, healthy ones Not muffins, cookies and breads. The last time this person who moderated your comment read the article(not the book) was 4 years ago! If you go to the web site you can receive current research data. There is not a lot of supplimentation either a good mulit. some EFA's and that's about it. His workout is also awsome!!!You feel so power charged after!!!

Last edited by MrsJim : 07-04-2004 at 12:16 PM. Reason: forgot something
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Old 07-04-2004, 12:27 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warriorchick
The last time this person who moderated your comment read the article(not the book) was 4 years ago!
I actually re-read the article *before* I posted it. I first read the article in 2001 - and RECALLED it when I saw this post.

Incidentally I went to the website you linked to (which I have removed from your post as it is against the forum rules to post URLs of this type). My goodness - for such a simple plan, he certainly has a lot to sell, doesn't he? A VERY expensive protein powder, an overpriced 'fat burning pill' and a bunch of books, newsletters, and videos. Sorry, but my SCAM radar went off like a rocket just now...
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Highest weight: 265 pounds, size 24/26 (May 1990)
May 1991: 174 pounds (-91 lbs)
September 1996: 155 pounds (-110 lbs)
*LIVING at: 145-149 pounds, size 4/6 (-116/120 lbs)

*Maintenance = LIVING.
Posts by members, moderators and admins are not considered medical advice and no guarantee is made against accuracy. Please see your physician before taking advice found on the internet.

Wanna know how I lost the weight and have kept it off for over 16 years? Click here!
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Old 07-04-2004, 01:07 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsJim
I actually re-read the article *before* I posted it. I first read the article in 2001 - and RECALLED it when I saw this post.

Incidentally I went to the website you linked to (which I have removed from your post as it is against the forum rules to post URLs of this type). My goodness - for such a simple plan, he certainly has a lot to sell, doesn't he? A VERY expensive protein powder, an overpriced 'fat burning pill' and a bunch of books, newsletters, and videos. Sorry, but my SCAM radar went off like a rocket just now...
Your right there are alot of SCAM diets out there. Which book or recent article did you re-read? He has done a ton more research and his new data is far more superior. He is a biologist and this plan is so different from all the low carb, low to not fat etc that is out there. I am not saying this is the end all be all by any stretch, I guess I wanted to clarify the fact it is not based on starving yourself all day. Like any of the diets out there he does have products to compliment his plan. the difference with his is how they are made and the ingredance he selected. His are more expensive due to the fact he wanted the best sources, organic, pesticide free etc since his background is in biology he wanted NO items in his products that the body couldn't handle or handled as toxic products. He also at the seminar stated he prefered people to used real food over any suppliments except the multi, since most foods now aren't as nutrient rich as they used to be. Thanks for removing the sites. Iwas unaware of the rule on that. I must admit I scimmed the sign up info but I will re-read it.

Last edited by warriorchick : 07-04-2004 at 01:22 PM.
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Old 07-04-2004, 02:51 PM   #10
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Amen mrsJIm and Jack!!

Sounds like how I gained most of my weight, I didn't eat much during the day because I was so busy with my kids but then come dinner time and after dinner when I got some down time I would pour in the calories and go to bed where it would all get stored as fat because I was doing nothing to burn it. In fact my doctor said it is important to eat throughout the day, she feels the 6 small meal approach is the best. No way Am I going to do a diet that says I can have pizza, candy, burgers...no thanks, I love my clean eats and then my occasional free day I have to look forward to. I'll stick to my south beach
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Old 07-04-2004, 03:04 PM   #11
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Default Wow! The Warrior Diet need to clarify!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleRae
Amen mrsJIm and Jack!!

Sounds like how I gained most of my weight, I didn't eat much during the day because I was so busy with my kids but then come dinner time and after dinner when I got some down time I would pour in the calories and go to bed where it would all get stored as fat because I was doing nothing to burn it. In fact my doctor said it is important to eat throughout the day, she feels the 6 small meal approach is the best. No way Am I going to do a diet that says I can have pizza, candy, burgers...no thanks, I love my clean eats and then my occasional free day I have to look forward to. I'll stick to my south beach
As A trainer I have heard your story too often. Too much time being spent on everything and everyone else. Yes, starving yourself all day, then pigging out on all sorts of stuff will make you gain weight GUARANTEED! The Warrior Diet, through further study at John Hopkins University has improved so much. It doesn't allow for eating whatever at night it is designed to only include veggies, lean meats, low glycemic carbs until satisified NOT stuffed senseless. Ha! Don't get me wrong, I support all eating regeims as long as they support all food groups.
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Old 07-04-2004, 03:08 PM   #12
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We try to support a lot of diets here, and believe that there isn't one diet that is right for everyone. You have to find what fits your lifestyle and personal tastes, so that you will be able to stick to your diet for the long haul.

That being said, we also try to let people know if a particular diet seems like a fad, scam, or unhealthy in the long run. This particular diet is not one that I personally would try, or recommend. Also, their supplements contain things I personally would not put in my body, organic or not.

Here are a couple of articles I've found about the Warrior Diet, including some general information on spotting scam/fad diets:

From Margaret Loeper Vasquez, licensed dietitian and public relations director for the Massachusetts Dietetic Association.
Quote:
The Boston Herald; 7/6/2003; Nissman, Cara

Byline: Cara Nissman

So you're staring at yourself in the mirror, sucking in your gut and starting to hope the stormy weather doesn't let up in time for your pal's beach barbecue debauchery next month. Looking for a quick way to lose a few pounds?

You're not alone. More than 60 percent of U.S. adults are overweight or obese and more than two-thirds of all Americans are trying to lose or keep off weight, according to a 2002 Federal Trade Commission report that challenged several claims by weight-loss ads.

In desperation, people often turn to fad diets that promise to melt pounds quickly. But the programs, which range from fasting to limiting consumption of a particular food group or item, can seriously deprive the body of necessary nutrients.

`You'll be amazed at what people will try," said Margaret Loeper Vasquez, licensed dietitian and public relations director for the Massachusetts Dietetic Association.

Local dietitians warned against the following diets and others with similar restrictions.

THE RAW FOODS DIET

Popeye probably would dig this diet, considering he eats spinach straight from the can. But he'd feel weak if it were all he ate.

A diet that limits you to mostly raw foods - meaning mainly fruits and vegetables - can deprive you of the protein and many vitamins and minerals you need, said Elizabeth Metallinos-Katsaras, professor of nutrition at Simmons College's School for Health Studies.

"It excludes whole groups of foods," she said. "You can't eat anything high in protein, even beans. You can't eat lentils raw. And you're excluding any food with B-12."

And some nutrients, such as iron, are better absorbed when many vegetables are cooked, Loeper Vasquez said.

THE APPLE CIDER VINEGAR DIET

Who would chug vinegar as if it were tequila? You might cringe at the thought, but this diet has been around for decades. Proponents claim vinegar speeds up your metabolism, but dietitians argue the diet is simply an excuse for businesses to hawk their vinegar pills to those who dislike the taste of the stuff.

"There's no evidence that supports the idea that it has any effect on the metabolism," Metallinos-Katsaras said.

THE WARRIOR DIET

Ori Hofmekler, founder of the fitness magazine Mind & Muscle Power - but not a licensed dietitian or nutritionist - says his plan, "The Warrior Diet" (Dragon Door, $26.95), speeds metabolism by limiting people to just fruits and vegetables all day and then allowing them to gorge on a large dinner at night. He said a National Institute on Aging study on mice that found health benefits to fasting and gorging bolsters his weight-loss theory.

"In the past, hunters, warriors and wild animals alike intuitively and instinctively chose this eating style to optimize their strength and ensure their survival," he said in a press release.

Licensed dietitian Caitlin Hosmer said the NIA research is interesting, but that Hofmekler's claims are a bit far-fetched.

"It may be true that stressing out the cells and not exposing them to food all the time may be a beneficial thing for their health over a long time," said Hosmer, who manages the nutrition consultation service at Brigham and Women's Hospital. "But it's still a stretch to get to weight loss. It's very common to jump off preliminary research and try to extrapolate magic answers."

Loeper Vasquez said eating small well-rounded meals throughout the day is a better way to ward off diseases and prevent weight gain.

"If you're eating so much at the end of the day, you'll have a higher risk of gastrointestinal reflux," she said. "We're not warriors any more. We're not doing the physical activity of warriors today. You can't make those correlations."

Hofmekler could not be reached for comment.

Lying to be thin

People shouldn't feel embarrassed about falling for a fad diet, said Simmons College professor Elizabeth Metallinos-Katsaras.

"I think a lot of people are susceptible," she said. "It's natural to want to do something fun, something painless. But none of these diets have demonstrated that they can keep the weight off."

Several dietitians suggested reasons to steer clear of weight-loss programs:

- The diet focuses on a food group or simply a handful of foods.

- The cited scientific evidence isn't directly linked to losing weight or hasn't been tested on human beings.

- The person behind the diet lacks credentials in nutrition.

- The program boasts many testimonials, which may be contrived.

- A claim that seems too good to be true may be, especially if the company is urging you to buy their product.

Daniel Katz, MD, mentioned the Warrior Diet in an article published in O (Oprah's magazine) which was about fad diets and how to spot a scam. This article contains a lot of helpful information about diets in general, so I'll post the whole thing

Quote:
How to spot a diet scam from a mile away: fat! No fat! Sugar! Protein! Fruit only! Food combining! Enough already! David L. Katz, MD, busts the bogus claims of some of today's best-known weight loss programs. (Your Body).



O, The Oprah Magazine; 1/1/2003; Katz, David L.

AN ASTOUNDING 65 PERCENT OF AMERICAN adults are overweight, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No wonder it's a seller's market for fad diets, which come in many flavors: Atkins advocates a high intake of fat; the Zone pushes protein and restricts carbohydrates. Sugar Busters claims low-fat diets don't work. There's the blood type diet, the warrior diet (fast all day, binge at night), the vats-of-cabbage-soup diet. How can you tell which highly touted weight loss plan is sound and Which isn't? To avoid wasting time and money on a diet that won't hold up for more than a few weeks -- and may damage your health--Look for these red flags:

Defiant claims of a renegade genius.

Watch out for a diet guru who professes to understand nutritional science but rejects it, contending that prevailing views on weight control are misguided. Posing as an unconventional genius who perceives truths mere mortals can't see is an easy way to get attention. Conventional wisdom is indeed wise--and hard earned, the product of painstaking research and long-term observation.

Dis-counting calories. Beware of any regimen suggesting that the key to weight loss lies not in controlling calorie intake but in tinkering with the body's level of a single hormone or chemical, such as insulin (Atkins, Sugar Busters, Carbohydrate Addicts) or eicosanoids, a class of hormone-like substances involved in many body processes, especially the production and prevention of inflammation. (In the Zone, they're called super hormones.) In reality, the regulation of weight involves the complicated interaction of many hormones and chemicals. It also rests on a simple truth: You gain weight when you take in more calories than you use up. If a fad diet works, it's because the dieter lowered her calorie intake. For example, the Zone diet leads to weight loss not because of a magic combination of proteins and carbohydrates but because the diet provides 1,100 calories a day for the average person, a level that usually leads to a weight loss of one to two and a half pounds a week. An initial burst of pound shedd ing on these diets is mainly from potentially harmful water loss.

Enticing testimonials. Ads for fad diets generally offer convincing quotes from highly satisfied customers. These are as easy to obtain as they are meaningless. The quotes may come from the brief period of peak satisfaction. How do these folks feel six months later, when the weight is likely to have come back? The ads don't say.

The promise of a quick fix. Fad diets promise--and may even deliver--rapid weight loss, offering a short-term solution to a permanent problem. The tendency to gain weight will not go away after a few weeks of eating only grapefruit or bacon. A diet so unbalanced that you can't stay on it for more than a few weeks or months without feeling awful is of no use for lifelong weight control. And the lack of balance can hurt your health. Extreme high-protein, low-carb diets can lead to vitamin deficiencies, a loss of bone density, and other problems.

What to do after you've protected yourself against squandering time, money, and perhaps even your health on nutritional nonsense? Keep the constant company of your common sense and learn the skills and strategies you need to eat well despite the challenges of modern living--skills such as controlling hunger, balancing pleasure from food with pleasure in health and weight control, interpreting food labels so you can stock a pantry and fridge with healthful brands and products, making ingredient substitutions that add nutrition without subtracting taste, avoiding social pressure to overeat, and making physical activity an everyday part of life.

When you consider a new food program, first check to make sure it has none of the red flags listed above. Remember that any weight control program that doesn't include physical activity isn't a good one. If you're a parent, consider whether it's a way of eating you would endorse for your kids. If it's not healthful enough for them--offering an abundance of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains--it's not healthful enough for you! Ask yourself whether you'd feel comfortable and confident eating this way for the rest of your life. If not, it's an on-again, off-again diet, and these simply don't work.

David L. Katz, MD, is associate clinical professor of public health and medicine at Yale University School of Medicine and author of The Way to Eat (Sourcebooks).
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Old 07-04-2004, 04:15 PM   #13
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thanks for the info. I guess you have to be a bit of a extremist for a eating regine/lifestyle like this. Again I do not even suggest a fad diet to my clients. I stress only healthy, natural foods as far from processing methods as possible. The simpler the better.
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Old 07-05-2004, 11:53 PM   #14
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extreme diets? that's how so many of us ended up needing weight loss surgery!!!!
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