General chatter - I like to keep my vote private...




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POOKIE88
11-08-2006, 12:39 AM
I voted today and I am happy I did. One thing that bothers me though- these days folks seem to feel very free to ask me who I voted for.

I am not sure if I am remembering correctly, but it seems to me that people did not ask that question as freely when I was much younger.

I think to myself there is a reason why they have a CURTAIN on the voting booth.

I even crossed out my party affiliation on my voting card because a few years ago when I went to vote the people working at the voting booth looked at my card and made comments about my party affiliation and discussed it among themselves. They were not nasty comments but it still made me uncomfortable they were discussing my personal business among themselves, so now I have it crossed out on my card.

Maybe I am old-fashioned. It is just me or does it ever bother anyone else when people ask who you voted for? Just wondering:?:


lizziness
11-08-2006, 02:44 AM
I think it depends on who it is and what their intention is.... I don't mind talking about it at all, but I don't know how i'd feel about someone i don't know coming up to me and asking me who I voted for either... seems kind of rude.
I especially think that people discussing your party is really inappropriate, especially if they are people working at the booth. Rude!

mandalinn82
11-08-2006, 02:58 AM
I agree with Lizziness - it depends on situation. I mean, my family and friends know I'm political, so it doesn't bother me - but random people? Horrible.

I had campaign workers for the CA special election/primary talking about election issues among themselves while i was voting. There must be a rule against that?!


Losingme
11-08-2006, 06:19 AM
I agree. My mom has told me that my grandfather wouldn't discuss who he voted for. She told me this my entire life. She said that he would always say that such things are not to be discussed. I never met my grandfather. He died before I was born but I carry on his message. I don't discuss who I voted for with anyone besides my family.

techwife
11-08-2006, 08:16 AM
I agree that it's private. Mostly, reason being for me, is that there are two things that can divide friends...politics and religion. If you KNOW someone has the same affiliation as you, then its nice to soap box amongst the two of you, but when talking in general about these topics, you never know who you'll offend, so I keep my trap shut. I lost a very good friend in 2000 because I voted for the 'other' presidential candidate. I wished I'd kept my mouth shut.

jtammy
11-08-2006, 08:25 AM
I don't talk about it for the same reasons techwife mentioned. I don't even talk about it with my extended family for the same reasons, we tend to have different political views.

I don't consider it appropriate for people to ask me who I voted for either. I also wouldn't ask someone else. It is private, if I want it to be, and I don't feel any need to satisfy someone else's random curiousity.

jillybean720
11-08-2006, 08:33 AM
I voted yesterday for the first time ever (I'm 24). I haven't told anyone who I voted for--not even my boyfriend!

Every time an election has come up in the past, though, I would get a LOT of crap from people about my decision NOT to vote. South Park has a fabulous episode that perfectly expressed how I felt and why I chose not to vote (they played the episode last night, too, which was perfect). It's about the kids at school having to vote for a new school mascot, and it comes down to the 2 candidates being a "giant douche" or a "turd sandwich." Stan decides he's not going to vote at all because both the douch and the turd are stupid, so why force yourself to pick one over the other? That's how I have felt during many of the past elections (not that I've been old enough to vote very many times, but still). I changed my mind this time because I really really really wanted to go and vote for the constitutional amendments that were up for vote in Virginia (the amendment basically again trying to forbid same sex marriage was up for vote). And so, I chose between the douches and the turds to ensure I had a vote in the amendment decision.

I was raised in a non-voting family. The generally-accepted stance in my family is that most politicians are cheaters and liars, so why support any of them? That upbringing is another reason I didn't vote as often as I could have.

junebug41
11-08-2006, 09:27 AM
I had campaign workers for the CA special election/primary talking about election issues among themselves while i was voting. There must be a rule against that?!

In CO, and other places I would imagine, there is. You are strictly forbidden to "campaign" at a polling place. Here, they even tossed out a 65 year old grandmother for wearing a button that said "Peace". Now, they may not be technically campaigning, but perhaps they would fall under that rule because of their positions?

It's a new rule, but overdue I believe as it does discourage people from doing that.

My mom will discuss her vote until she's blue in the face and it drives me nuts. I love talking about the process, but I agree with techwife. I have been offended too many times by just hearing people discuss it aorund me. My dad never talks about his vote or even voting, but I always know he does it.

EZMONEY
11-08-2006, 09:28 AM
[I was raised in a non-voting family. The generally-accepted stance in my family is that most politicians are cheaters and liars, so why support any of them? That upbringing is another reason I didn't vote as often as I could have.

Most ~ is a strong word, you could be right, but if we don't vote for the better canidates we don't stand a chance. Look at the morals of our country in the last 25 years alone, broken homes, drugged up all alone kids, etc.

We have been in many heated discussions over the years at work. I am in construction and union, many of us do not agree with the political affiliations our union picks for us. I have never lost a friend for these talks...arguments, but there has been hard feelings from time to time. We always get over it though.

Voting is personal, I suppose I could be offended by being asked who I voted for, but I never have. I believe in sharing my view, wether the other person wants to hear it or not, somebody has to save them right? ;)

We have mini heated discussions around our house sometimes. My kids and I are members of the grand Elephant Party, Angie is a member of the :tree: Christmas Party.

Personally I vote for the "man/woman" as long as they are republicans :sssh: ;)

jillybean720
11-08-2006, 10:35 AM
Most ~ is a strong word, you could be right, but if we don't vote for the better canidates we don't stand a chance. Look at the morals of our country in the last 25 years alone, broken homes, drugged up all alone kids, etc.
I said the "most" idea was that which is generally accepted by my family (and, therefore, how I was raised), not MY current personal view ;) Although with the number of politicians involved in scandals these days...

Personally, I honestly sometimes cannot choose a "better" candidate. With anti-abortion Democrats and pro-gay rights Republicans and whatnot, sometimes when I stack up the good and bad of each, they come out about even. Is closing my eyes and picking one just for the sake of picking one really any better than not voting at all? (due to the aforementioned examples, I am not willing to vote based solely on political party--too many "exceptions")

Not trying to start a debate--lord knows I don't need to be involved in a politics discussion...just some food for thought :^:

I'm not sure what the "morals of our country" has to do with voting. Politicians have little to do with how people raise their children today.

Bravelilchicken
11-08-2006, 10:42 AM
When I voted last night I had to vote provisional. I brought my card out of my booth and everyone acted like I was naked or something, Looking at the ceiling, at the floor, suddenly their shoe came alive and was fascinating, lol. I was glad though. The lady who handed me the envelope to seal it in acted like my card was a booger, lol. I marked not affiliated with any party and no one asked me anything for which I was thankful.
Doesn't even discussing voting make your skin crawl with fear of a big blow up over who is right and wrong?

rockinrobin
11-08-2006, 11:06 AM
That's the whole thing, Jillybean, we've got to decide which turd or douche we would rather have in office. I have many times voted for people I was not that thrilled with, but you gotta decide who you hate the least. And then keep your fingers crossed.

techwife
11-08-2006, 11:13 AM
Jill: You know, now that you're a registered voter...nothing is stopping you from voting only for what you want to vote for. For instance, when I registered, it was pretty much to vote for a school budget. In our voting booths, you pull down a lever for the person or issue you want to vote for. As far as I know, nothing is stopping you from not voting for either of them. Like, for instance, if you only really are interested in voting for or against an issue that is up for election, you could just vote for that and leave the rest blank. For instance, again, in my neck of the woods, it's a big political debate whether or not my town is going to allow windmills to be constructed all over the place. Many people are for it, but some are against it. If it went to the polls to vote for it or against it, but you don't really know enough about the congressional or senatorial candidates to want to vote for them, you could just go vote for/against the windmills and leave the others blank. Know what I'm saying? I agree with you that many of the politicians are turd sandwiches and/or douche bags. But, if you want to vote without being totally informed of the actual individual that's running, if you get to know the democrat and republican (or others) agendas and the basic morals they 'usually' stand by...then you can say, "Well, don't know this guy, but I like the democrat purpose or the republican purpose and they are probably, more than likely, on board with those principals, so I'll vote for him/her." At least if he person that wins turns out to be a jerk and you didn't vote for him/her...at least you can say, "Hey, it's not my fault...I voted for the other guy!" Either way, it's your right to take it or leave it. ;)

mandalinn82
11-08-2006, 12:51 PM
Also, have you considered voting for someone who is not a member of either party? Generally, even if I hate either the republican or the democrat, I like someone on the ballot enough to give them my vote. I did that in two races this year because the major party candidates were just horrible and I couldn't swallow filling in the bubble for them.

jillybean720
11-08-2006, 01:48 PM
Also, have you considered voting for someone who is not a member of either party?
Of course--in fact I voted for an Independent candidate yesterday :) Which sometimes feels like not voting at all since you know the majority will vote R or D (unless the independent candidate actually even shows up on pre-election polls, like in the few states where an I candidate actually won), but I couldn't in good conscience vote for either for this particular option.

techwife--there was no pulling of levers in our booths (I even hesitate to call them "booths"--there was no curtain to pull behind you, only on either side). It was an electronic device with a screen and a few buttons...I'm not sure if it would let you skip voting for certain things or not. It didn't give me the "submit ballot" option until I had selected an answer in each category. I may have to look into that...

Man, I hate politics...:dizzy:

mandalinn82
11-08-2006, 01:51 PM
My perspective is - perhaps enough people will decide they are sick of both of the two major parties, and start voting for more independent or third-party candidates. Then maybe we won't have to make "lesser of two evils" decisions anymore, because there will be more people with an actual chance of running.

I understand hating politics, and I'd really like to APPLAUD you for going to vote despite not particularly caring for it. It really is an important thing to do, in general, IMO.

4myloves
11-08-2006, 01:56 PM
in fact I voted for an Independent candidate yesterday Which sometimes feels like not voting at all since you know the majority will vote R or D (unless the independent candidate actually even shows up on pre-election polls, like in the few states where an I candidate actually won)

Un-uh!!! Those Independent votes can swing an election!!!!!! Just look at Ross Perot and lots of other Independents whose voting numbers have "lost" elections for an otherwise strong "in-party" candidate.

jillybean720
11-08-2006, 02:10 PM
Un-uh!!! Those Independent votes can swing an election!!!!!! Just look at Ross Perot and lots of other Independents whose voting numbers have "lost" elections for an otherwise strong "in-party" candidate.
But numbers-wise, wouldn't it be the same if I just didn't vote at all? If the 2 leading candidates have 10 votes each and the Indie has 2 votes, then what's the difference in those 2 people just didn't vote (aside from making the Indie guy feel bad for not getting any votes at all ;) )?

Edit to add: I'm not trying to be difficult--it's an honest question (I'm often sarcastic, so I didn't want this to be misinterpreted as instigation).

mandalinn82
11-08-2006, 02:14 PM
The difference is, if enough people vote for independents, two things could happen:

1) one or both parties will change the way they are doing business to try to get those votes so they can win elections. This may mean going to a more moderate position on various issues, rather than staying at extremes. This is the more likely outcome, but option 2 is also possible.
2) one or more "third-party" political parties may gain more strength with every vote they receive, which might take the US further away from a two-party political system, which I think would provide better choices for the voters of this country.

cbmare
11-08-2006, 02:18 PM
2) one or more "third-party" political parties may gain more strength with every vote they receive, which might take the US further away from a two-party political system, which I think would provide better choices for the voters of this country.


!! AMEN !!

sapphire9
11-08-2006, 02:45 PM
Pookie - you might want to consider voting permanent absentee to avoid all that nonsense at the polls.
I for one am relieved the election is finally over. Got tired of all those phone calls and tv ads! Happy the way most of it came out, except we still have The Terminator as governor. Oh well, there wasn't much choice there.

Sakai
11-08-2006, 03:55 PM
Maybe it's because I like a good debate.. but if a person asks me.. I will tell the who I voted for AND WHY. Nothing gets my blood flowing like talking politics. I'm strange @_@

I don't ask people who they voted for unless it's my family or my bestest friend. I know they don't mind talking about it.

maegdaeien
11-08-2006, 08:36 PM
Sakai, I love talking politics too! It's okay!

I agree that random people shouldn't barge into your personal views, and I also find it very odd that many polling stations are churches. I realize there's a big Republican push now to merge church and state, but I would think that it would make many people uncomfortable.

As far as not voting, I think it's okay to skip a section of the ballot if you don't know which candidate or proposal you are for, but in general you should definitely make an effort in the areas that matter to you. It doesn't take that long, and if you're of color and/or a woman you should appreciate what people have gone through in order for you to have the right to vote. Those lives shouldn't be thrown away just because you don't feel like it or are a little disheartened.

jillybean720
11-08-2006, 09:49 PM
It doesn't take that long
heh, I arrived at my voting location at 6:05am (they opened at 6)--I waited in line for 40 minutes (just in line--then took more time to repeat my address to the registration guy about 20 times, then go to another table to get an access code for the electronic voting booth, then finally actually go and vote) :dizzy: I guess I was lucky...a coworker went after work instead of before, and she said she was there for over an hour and a half. There has GOT to be a more efficient means of registering people than to actually sit and flip through a paper list of all registered voters in the district. The guy registering us was so slow that even though there were 8 voting booths, there were never more than 4 or 5 actually being used at a time.

Of course, in the grand scheme of things, 40 minutes is nothing compared to how long it's actually going to take my state (Virginia) to finally declare a winning Senator. They already know there will be a recount, so nothing will be 100% official until November 27. I guess it was a good election for me to begin voting in--with such a close race here, I feel more like my vote might actually have been worth something, ya know, rather than one candidate winning by a landslide.

POOKIE88
11-08-2006, 10:30 PM
Wow thanks for all the wonderful posts. I was tired tonight, but this lively thread woke me right up!:)


I do have to agree that part of the reason why I keep my vote private is that I have seen so many people get into big fights over politics. It always amazes me when I see people who have been friends for YEARS suddenly get into a huge argument over a political discussion. I have even seen friendships totally ruined over this topic.

I used to work in a dept of about 40 people. It just so happened that the vast majority of the people in the dept had a VERY different political view than mine. Right around election time there were loud discussions in the dept with people even yelling out nasty things about some of the candidates in my party. I learned to keep my political opinions to myself because I knew I had to work with these people 8 hours a day / 5 days a week. They were so passionate and vocal about their views that I was concerned I would be an "outsider" if I spoke about my political views. The other thing is that I agreed with these people about almost every OTHER topic, it was just politics that we were very different. I decided to focus on all the things we agreed on and not focus on the one topic where we differed. Oh and one more thing--the BOSS of the entire dept also was very vocal and agreed with what the others said. So I did not want to get into a disagreement with the person who signed my paycheck and wrote my job reviews.

I was always very glad when election time was over and we could get on to OTHER topics. I don't mind at all when people encourage others to vote, because I do think it is important for folks to vote. Especially when you think about all the countries where folks are not allowed to vote. I just don't like it when people try to push their opinions on to others or critize other's political opinions.

I am actually glad we live in a country where there is more than one politcal party and people have different opinions. If there was only ONE party that would probably be something like a dictatorship --Pookie

EZMONEY
11-08-2006, 11:47 PM
heh, I arrived at my voting location at 6:05am (they opened at 6)--I waited in line for 40 minutes

THAT IS WHY I ALWAYS VOTE ABSENTEE ~ I NEVER KNOW WHERE I WILL BE WORKING ON ELECTION DAY ~ WHAT THINGS MAY COME UP TO MAKE IT DIFFICULT TO GET TO THE POLLS. THIS WAY I ALWAYS VOTE.

I guess it was a good election for me to begin voting in--with such a close race here, I feel more like my vote might actually have been worth something, ya know, rather than one candidate winning by a landslide.

JILLY! YOUR VOTE ALWAYS COUNTS!!



WELL THE DEMOCRATS WON THE HOUSE AND SENATE...WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE! ;)

Michelle
11-09-2006, 12:12 AM
I'm also glad we voted with our ballots that came in the mail, and then DH drove right up to the front of the elections office and someone was there to take it from him, not even having to get out of the vehicle, best way to go!;)

RobinAnn
11-09-2006, 12:52 AM
I also find it very odd that many polling stations are churches. I realize there's a big Republican push now to merge church and state, but I would think that it would make many people uncomfortable.
At least voting in church buildings isn't a new phenomenon. I remember going with my mother when she voted (oh, about 40 years ago) at the local synagogue. I think, in general, churches are one of the few venues big enough and cheap enough to use for voting (although I have voted in a neighbor's garage once).

I'm the voting official for our Special District (a Fire District). I run elections for the board vacancies and unfortunately next year, for a mill levy increase. If you guys think the process is hard from the voter's perspective... yuck... try being me. :) And to find competent voting judges that aren't 150 years old... Ugh.

Anyway, I love the whole process of voting (except for when the returns are contrary to my votes).

Mummy_Tummy
11-09-2006, 03:36 AM
I don't mind discussing politics with family and friends, my husband and I being the lone libs in a family of very conservative people. I was really worried about introducing my husband to my sister's husband because they are about as far political opposites as you can get. I even tried to steer the conversation away from politics. But my dad and I love to debate and it did creep in and the 4 of us had a lively and funny discussion and I was so impressed how everyone really listened to each other and stated their views without tantrums. It CAN be done but I don't think the workplace is the place to do it and I definitely think it's rude for strangers or aquaintances to ask.

Ooooh, which reminds me, I need to call my dad and gloat. He's had the upper hand for the last few years!:D ;)