Weight Loss Support - How Do You Stay Motivated?




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abbyin
10-01-2006, 07:56 PM
Well, I am back :) . Been gone all summer and fortunately only gained 2 pounds but I didn't lose much before. It's my fault I know (hate to exercise and just love food to much). I have dragged my DH in this time so we are counting calories together and I think that will help :hug: .

It's just soooo hard to stick to eating right everyday. We have been doing pretty good since last Monday (our start date), but we did declair a FREE day on Fridays. We're working pretty hard (and I am really proud of DH, cause he is a real EATER :hungry: ). I am trying to walk a few times a week :carrot: (I did say I hate to exercise) but this is really hard.

How do you stay motivated and just say no to fattening food? This, we are struggling with. We havn't given in too bad yet but it sure is tempting :devil: .

I'd love to know how everyone stays motivated to resist that restaurant food.
Any advice?


Ilene
10-01-2006, 08:00 PM
:welcome: back abbyin :hug: ....

It's not an easy tast this losing weight :faint: ... But I think we just have to take it one day at a time and on some days, one minute at a time. It gets easier over time and you are really lucky to have hubby by your side that way you can clean the kitchen and he won't complain too much...

Hang in there and keep posting :hug:

pgray1229
10-01-2006, 09:41 PM
Hello! I'm on Weight Watchers, I love it! How do I stay motivated? Seeing the scale move every week, seeing my clothes get baggier on my body and getting the compliments from my DH, feeling GREAT after I workout, and seeing the changes in my body from working out!

I've been on WW for almost 4 weeks, and in the first 3 weeks, I've lost 15.5lbs. I eat whatever I want. I need to have my daily sweet, sometimes I have a swee something twice a day!

I know you'll do great! Just be careful on those free days ;)


JayEll
10-01-2006, 10:12 PM
Hey, glad you're back again!

Motivation is a problem, that's for sure. I suppose it comes down to how many cycles of gaining, losing, gaining, losing, gaining again have to pass, before a person finally figures it out!

I thought I was exercising enough, but as it turns out I wasn't doing enough physical activity after all. So I had to change my mind about that and do more.

I thought that eating "naughty foods" now and then would be OK--but as it turns out, I was eating them too often, and I had no idea how many calories I ate. Did you know a Whopper, single, no cheese, has 670 calories? :fr: This is according to the BK website. So, I do eat at restaurants, but I'm careful with the calorie count. I have to "leave room" if I'm going to eat something high in calories.

So, one thing that can help motivation is to track things better, just for curiosity if nothing else. Like with FitDay or some other calculator to track calories eaten, calories burned.

With 15 pounds to lose for you, and not all that much more for your DH, it shouldn't take forever! Only a few months at most. But the important thing it seems is to develop more healthy habits of activity and eating.

I hope you hang in there! And enjoy! :goodvibes

Jay

SW/CW/GW
186/181/155

futuresurferchick
10-01-2006, 10:24 PM
Did you know a Whopper, single, no cheese, has 670 calories? :fr:

I suspect that a lot of those calories come from the mayo, if the toppings are included as part of that calculation. I used to work at BK and I loved that mayo... I weighed so much and was SO unhealthy when I worked there :o

almostheaven
10-01-2006, 11:06 PM
I don't say no to the junk food...constantly. I learned to say no to it as a daily plan. Ocassionally, I'll have something not on my healthy eating menu, and have it in moderation. I don't order pizza every Friday now...and eat 4 slices. But I might have 2 slices every 2 or 3 months. To keep it at a minimum, don't be around it. Since you're both doing this, you can easily get it out of the house. Replace your breads/pastas with whole grain, stock up on fresh fruits and veggies, keep loads of bottled water in the fridge instead of sodas. Go only to restaurants that serve a healthier menu. Plan your meals ahead of time, even when eating out. Know what you're going to order when you get there and it's nutrition info (you can find it online).

Force yourself to exercise by scheduling/planning it. Put your gym bag in the car if needed. Park far away from doors and always opt for the stairs...that is daily exercise you can get used to doing without actually feeling like it's taking up your time or taking a lot of effort. It becomes habit after awhile. My dad is handicapped. When he's with me, I often forget to park close to the door and have to back out of my spot at the back of the lot and park closer. LOL

Misti in Seattle
10-01-2006, 11:32 PM
I don't stay "motivated" (as in a "feeling") but I don't expect to. It is a decision -- just like going to work every day. I want the results more than I don't want the consequences of NOT doing it. :)

sotypical
10-01-2006, 11:42 PM
I don't stay "motivated" (as in a "feeling") but I don't expect to. It is a decision -- just like going to work every day. I want the results more than I don't want the consequences of NOT doing it. :)

I agree 110%. I want to be skinny that is it. There is no motivation to me, I just want it and I do want I need to do to get what I want.

WhitWhit
10-02-2006, 12:46 AM
How I stay motivated:

1 - I look in the mirror.

2 - I think of my parents and family members that have diabetes.

3 - I think of my doctor's message: "Eat healthy, exercise regularly, lose weight, and maintain a healthy weight so that you don't end up like your family members."

4 - I think about the fact that I do not want to spend my money on prescriptions in the future.

5 - I think about the fact that I am 25 and single...oh probably because I'm chubby and no professional, successful man would want me, so I need to become a trophy wife.

Zorak
10-02-2006, 12:53 AM
What I did was to wean myself slowly from junk foods. I was a soda junkie so I limited myself to a can a day of the real stuff. Same thing with dessert. I normally would have a small dessert of an iice cream sandwich or two Reese's Buttercups every night.

Eventually though for me, the sugary stuff lost its appeal. It's just too sweet now and I feel ill after eating it. I used to be a chocolate fiend and now I'm only interested in eating fruits. Potato chips and other junk foods make me want to gag.

Instead of reaching for chocolate, perhaps you can try eating fruit for dessert. I used to eat a piece of fruit for lunch, but started eating it as my dessert instead when I realized that I enjoyed eating the fruit much more than I did the junk dessert. :p

I do allow myself a treat meal, but it usually ends up looking like every other meal. LOL

Another thing that keeps me on track is to eat for preformance or eating right to help with exercising. Set a goal fitness-wise and work towards it and use healthy eating as part of your training plan. :)

abbyin
10-02-2006, 09:52 AM
Thanks guys for all the great advice. We are tracking our calories on fitday and we're not going too nuts on Friday:dizzy: . I do need to work on excersizing more and making it more of a routine. I have a pretty sedentary job.

We'll keep plugging along! :carrot:. Wish us luck!

QuilterInVA
10-02-2006, 01:36 PM
It's total easy to say no to junk food, sweets, desserts once you discipline yourself and go without for 2 weeks. The cravings are gone and its not a problem. The problem comes when you tell yourself that you are being "deprived" instead of seeing this as a choice to ensure a healthy life. Attitude is 90% thought and 10% doing. I do not feel like I'm missing a thing because the stuff no longer even tastes good to me.

Nikaia
10-02-2006, 01:57 PM
My favorite trick when I'm really craving something bad - like my Latte of Doom concoction or something - is to remind myself of two things. 1: I always feel crappy after eating something that I know isn't good for me. 2: It will be there tomorrow if I still want it then.

Using those two things, I can pretty reliably keep away from the worst food/drink temptations.

Exercise is another matter...I'm trying to use my signature on here as a self-prodding system. I'm tracking minutes per week and miles per month. I've set goals, and seeing it laid out graphically like that really helps motivate me.

But we're all different in what motivates us. Good luck!

Goodbye Chubby
10-02-2006, 02:23 PM
I don't stay "motivated" (as in a "feeling") but I don't expect to. It is a decision -- just like going to work every day. I want the results more than I don't want the consequences of NOT doing it. :)

I would also have to agree with Misti. I like the "going to work" analogy; some days you show up late, sometimes you're just not very productive, but whatever minor slip-ups you have, you still keep going.

If there was a guaranteed way to feel motivated all the time, weightloss would be easy. The key lies in going to the gym and being mindful of what you're eating even when you don't feel like it (and being able to forgive yourself when you do slip up and just move on and try to do better next time).

BlueToBlue
10-02-2006, 02:27 PM
The following quote sums it up for me:

"Decide what you want; decide what you're willing to exchange for it; establish your priorities, and go to work." --H.L. Hunt

I have decided that I want to be thin and I'm willing to exchange eating the way that I used to eat to be that way. So, when I want a glass of wine or a piece of cake, I just ask myself if it is worth the delay in getting to my goal to have it. Sometimes it is but most of the time it isn't.

What also helps is that:

For the most part, I like that foods that I eat. I am constantly experimenting with new foods to find things I enjoy eating. So I don't really feel deprived on a daily basis.
I don't deprive myself all of the time. I go out to eat once or twice a month and don't worry about the calories when I do. Sometimes I have a glass of wine or two with dinner. Often times knowing I have a treat like this planned will help me stay with my program--e.g., I don't need a glass of wine tonight because I'm going to have one at the end of the week.
I don't buy the foods that I really have trouble resisting. There aren't many foods that fall into this category, but there are a few and I just don't keep them in the house. Once I threw out an entire bag of trail mix because after the first couple of servings it was clear I was going to eat the whole bag in a couple of days if I didn't get it out of the house. Won't be buying that again (at least not for a long, long time).
Just like not buying foods that I can't resist, I resist restaurant foods by not going to restaurants. We just don't eat out anymore unless it's some sort of occasion or we are going out with friends. The days of "let's go out because I don't feel like cooking dinner" are over for me.
When I'm 80, all bets are off! I'm not doing this forever; once I turn 80 I can eat whatever I want. Granted, that's over 40 years away, but the thought still helps.
If I manage to maintain my weight for two more years, I get to buy myself a convertible. My SO totally thinks I'm joking about this but I'm not! I'm way serious--I'm thinking maybe a Miata or one of the Toyota convertibles!


- Barbara

fiddler
10-02-2006, 03:49 PM
How do you stay motivated and just say no to fattening food?

I don't say no to it. If I really want it, I eat it, and eat less for the rest of the day.

I'd love to know how everyone stays motivated to resist that restaurant food.

Learn how to cook food at home that is better than restaurant food. Seriously. Restaurant food appeals to me very little anymore, because I mostly like my own cooking better. But there are a few things at certain restaurants that I really like, and I don't resist them. I just work them into my daily eating plan.

One thing that seems to trip up a lot of people up is that they visualize this imaginary "dieting clock" that starts their dieting day. And if they go off-plan during the day, then they rationalize that they've already ruined their plan for the day so they may as well just keep eating off-plan until the next day. Obviously, if you have too many days like this your weight loss is going to come to a halt. In my opinion it's much better just to accept that from time to time you are going to eat stuff that is fattening and just compensate for it by eating less the rest of the day. No big guilt trips; no rationalizations.

cantforgetthis
10-02-2006, 04:02 PM
It's total easy to say no to junk food, sweets, desserts once you discipline yourself and go without for 2 weeks. The cravings are gone and its not a problem. The problem comes when you tell yourself that you are being "deprived" instead of seeing this as a choice to ensure a healthy life. Attitude is 90% thought and 10% doing. I do not feel like I'm missing a thing because the stuff no longer even tastes good to me.


Just ditto me on this one. ;) When I first started, I was drinking maybe 2 liters of soda a day. That had to go. Coffee was causing to many ups and downs in my energy level. That had to go. Sugar spikes sent me reeling. It had to go. Flour is just plain empty calories, wasn't willing to eat it. That had to go. Over a period of months I found that the less I ate of these things the more I could eat of the "good stuff" and also that I no longer had cravings for the other.

Now I don't feel deprived, I simply have no interest, although I would never claim that I wouldn't like the taste! :D Once in a while I want something like a good steak or my favorite is baby back ribs (without sauce), I have it and it's done. I feel no guilt, I enjoy it and move on as though it was a non-event, which I truely believe, over the course of my life, it is. This is a much better place to be in than thinking i'm missing out on something for the rest of my life. :carrot:

alinnell
10-02-2006, 04:46 PM
The word you need to learn is MODERATION. I don't say "no" to anything. But I don't say "yes" very often when I know it is not good for me, my diet, or my lifestyle.

You need to also learn to take your time. The weight will not fall off in a couple of days or weeks. Give yourself enough time to reach your goal. I know it is possible to lose 2 or more pounds per week, but be realistic. Do you really think that you'll enjoy yourself if you're trying to lose that much that fast? Try instead for 3 pounds a month (and be ecstatic when you lose more!!!). You'll find that with moderation instead of deprivation you'll be more than willing to stick with it in the long haul and lose what you need.

Finally, I have found that taking a break every few weeks or momths helps a lot. Some people get really discouraged when they "plateau" (I know I did--that's when I found 3FC). Now, if I seem to be hitting a plateau, I concentrate on maintaining the loss that I have accomplished rather than trying to lose more. A few weeks of maintaining the loss then hitting the diet again did wonders for me! I "maintained" all summer long and got back on the wagon in September and lost 4 pounds!

Best of luck to you! I know you can do it!!

spanky
10-04-2006, 08:42 AM
Wow--what an inspiring thread!

Here's my moneys worth on Staying Motivated:

I look at Vickie. Vickie is my elegantly slender friend--she is 54 yrs old and always looks fabulous. She looks SO great all the time and is SO sophisticated in appearance that you'd never guess she's a workout maniac. Eats perfectly, never slips up. Always gets to wear the stuff I wish I could wear. And she is always gracious and kind.

Sometimes I hate Vickie. But just by being Vickie she kicks me in the rear to get my act together. All she has to say on the subject of my weight struggles is "How BADLY do you want it?" and "Just DO it!". Vickie soes not struggle with it, she does not fret over it. She just DOES it.

That's all,

Ipa

WaterRat
10-04-2006, 03:48 PM
I don't stay "motivated" (as in a "feeling") but I don't expect to. It is a decision -- just like going to work every day. I want the results more than I don't want the consequences of NOT doing it.

The word you need to learn is MODERATION. I don't say "no" to anything. But I don't say "yes" very often when I know it is not good for me, my diet, or my lifestyle.

These two things sum up how I feel about my downward journey for this the FINAL(!) time. There is no way I could deprive myself of everything "bad" I enjoy eating - but I can certainly moderate how often I eat it. And if I stood around waiting for motivation to exercise, I'd be channel-surfing most of the time! :lol: Misti's right - it's like a job, you just have to go do it. It does get easier once it's a habit, but some days it's what my DH calls a "place holder" workout - you go, you do a workout, but it's not your best, or even second-best effort, but it's done and you've at least stayed in place even if you didn't make any progress. The whole idea is to not backslide into that overweight, out-of-shape person again. :) I'm motivated now, because I have a fun, active trip planned for mid-January (to Costa Rica), but I know that my motivation will not carry me through the next 15 weeks. It'll be my ability to stick to my chosen lifestyle changes.

veggielover
10-04-2006, 05:28 PM
When I'm 80, all bets are off! I'm not doing this forever; once I turn 80 I can eat whatever I want. Granted, that's over 40 years away, but the thought still helps.



TEEHEE! That's me right there... :D

veggielover
10-04-2006, 05:39 PM
I don't say no to it. If I really want it, I eat it, and eat less for the rest of the day.



Learn how to cook food at home that is better than restaurant food. Seriously. Restaurant food appeals to me very little anymore, because I mostly like my own cooking better. But there are a few things at certain restaurants that I really like, and I don't resist them. I just work them into my daily eating plan.

One thing that seems to trip up a lot of people up is that they visualize this imaginary "dieting clock" that starts their dieting day. And if they go off-plan during the day, then they rationalize that they've already ruined their plan for the day so they may as well just keep eating off-plan until the next day. Obviously, if you have too many days like this your weight loss is going to come to a halt. In my opinion it's much better just to accept that from time to time you are going to eat stuff that is fattening and just compensate for it by eating less the rest of the day. No big guilt trips; no rationalizations.


I couldnt agree with what she said more.

Heather
10-04-2006, 05:48 PM
Wow, great thread. So many things I have said in the past, and now will say in the future!!!!!!

I'll add this to the equation: weight loss is more than a physical process -- it's a mental journey as well. A journey about your hopes and fears, and about conflicting desires. A brownie isn't a brownie any more, it's a desired and yet dreaded object. You have to ask yourself, 100 times a day sometimes, whether you want the brownie more than you want the life that beckons... What tips the balance one way or the other??? What makes that choice? I sometimes choose the brownie, but it is no longer a mindless, automatic choice, but a deliberate one...

My tagline below represents my commitment to this process, and the choices I make everyday.

WaterRat
10-04-2006, 06:51 PM
Not to hijack this thread, but Wyllenn you are doing fantastically well! It seems like just yesterday you got below 200, and now 185! :bravo:

And back to our regularly scheduled thread.... I have just started reading a new book "The Incredible Shrinking Critic" about a woman who lost 75 lbs and wrote a weekly column about it in the newspaper. Anyway, I'm not that far into it, but she talks a lot about how weight loss is so much mental, rather than physical, i.e. what it is that makes you eat. But she also discusses things like making better choices, and how to make them without feeling like you've given up everything! Like moving over several months from premium ice cream, to ice milk, to sorbet. Even if you don't change the quantity, you've lower the calories by a LOT. Same with exercise. I think the gov't scared a lot of people with their 60-90 minutes every day guidelines. But if you start with 10 or 15 minutes, and every few weeks you add more, pretty soon you are doing that much. It's all about balance and common sense. It doesn't have to be all or nothing! I'm wanting to stop working and keep reading.I hated to see my lunch hour come to an end. :lol:

mom_n_garden
10-04-2006, 10:24 PM
WOW... love reading everyones motivation tips! I can't begin to tell everyone how happy I am that I found this site.
I have stayed motivated to stay way from fast food by watching the movie 'Super Size Me'. If you have not watched - you need to! You will never eat at a fast food place again. http://www.supersizeme.com/
Lets all stay HEALTHY. GREAT to met everyone. God Bless!

veggielover
10-05-2006, 07:18 AM
WOW... love reading everyones motivation tips! I can't begin to tell everyone how happy I am that I found this site.
I have stayed motivated to stay way from fast food by watching the movie 'Super Size Me'. If you have not watched - you need to! You will never eat at a fast food place again. http://www.supersizeme.com/
Lets all stay HEALTHY. GREAT to met everyone. God Bless!

We had quite a nice talk about that movie on this forum. Believe me, not everyone welcomes it with open arms (yours truly doesn't..) but we had quite a good debate on it...

BlueToBlue
10-05-2006, 01:01 PM
I think the gov't scared a lot of people with their 60-90 minutes every day guidelines.

I totally agree. I know it scared me. When I first heard that, I literally gave up on the idea of getting into shape. I thought that if that was what it would take, there was no way I could manage it. Even now that I do exercise for 45-60 minutes a day, seven days a week, I still think that guideline is totally wacked. Honestly, 90 minutes? If you want to exercise that much, by all means do so, but I really don't think you need to do that much to be in shape.

Sorry if I've gotten off topic but that comment really resonated with me.

- Barbara

WaterRat
10-05-2006, 01:21 PM
Barbara, take a look at the current issue of Oprah magazine (you can see this part of it online). The whole issue is on aging, and there's a article on exercising for the various decades of your life. The actual recommendations were written by doctors and coaches. It's a much more reasonable/doable approach, and takes the attitude that any exercise is better than no exercise! One of my long term, back-of-my-mind motivations is preventing osteoporosis like my mother and MIL had - they were both bent over little old ladies. I get my RDA of calcium religiously, and aim for 4-5 days of some exercise every week. I do yoga off and on.

Heather
10-06-2006, 07:53 AM
Not to hijack this thread, but Wyllenn you are doing fantastically well! It seems like just yesterday you got below 200, and now 185!

Pat -- I'll hijack it back again for just a second... Yes, can you believe it?? It's amazing how that 1 pound or so a week adds up. I am 6 pounds away from being non-obese for the first time since I was 19 or so (over 20 years) and just can't believe it sometimes.