SBD Frequently Asked Questions - Conflicting info on phase II bread suggestions??




EmilieB
09-10-2006, 12:40 PM
I am preparing my shopping list for phase II and was studying the sticky in the FAQ section here about what kind of breads to buy. One suggestion was Brownberry 100% Whole Wheat. Another suggestion was to avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup.

I happen to already buy BB 100% WW bread and was reading the ingredients listed on the package and the 3rd item is HFCS- 3g sugar/slice.

So......I'm confused. I'm thinking this is not such a good choice for bread. It doesn't seem to meet the criteria yet it's listed as a good choice.

Help :?:


ladybugnessa
09-10-2006, 12:52 PM
sugar is needed to make the yeast rise. as long as the sugar is 3 grams or less and the dietary fiber is 3g or higher you should be ok.


From the "Daily Dish", the newsletter from the paid SBD site:

What to Look for on Labels
12/06/03

Here are three things to watch for when shopping for the South Beach Diet:

High Fiber. Look for breads (Phases 2 and 3) with at least 5 grams of fiber per serving. In general, it is recommended that you get four "high" fiber sources every day (with 5 grams or more of fiber per serving), and three to four "good" fiber sources (with 2.5 grams of fiber per serving). Good fiber sources also include vegetables, whole grains, and beans.

Low Sugar. A simple way to identify sugar in processed foods is to look for words ending in "ose," such as glucose, lactose, and sucrose. If any of these words appear in the first three ingredients listed, then the item is likely to be high in sugar and should be avoided.

"Good" Fats. Stick with monounsaturated fats, like canola oil and olive oil, and polyunsaturated fats like corn oil, peanut oil, and sesame oil. Avoid hydrogenated, saturated, and trans-fatty acids whenever possible. Most solid margarines contain trans-fatty acids, which are created when oil becomes "partially hydrogenated."

Breads to Buy (Phases 2 and 3)

Why are whole-grain breads better for you than breads made with enriched or refined flour? One reason is that whole-grain breads have a lower glycemic index. Another is that whole grains contain phytochemicals that may help cut the risk of heart disease and cancer. If you're in Phase 2 of the diet and can start eating bread again, here are some good brands to buy:

Pepperidge Farm:
100% Stoneground Whole Wheat
Natural Whole Grain 9 Grain
Natural Whole Grain German Dark Wheat
Pepperidge Farm Natural Whole Grain Crunchy Grains or Multi-Grain

Rubschlager:
European Style Whole Grain
100% Rye Rye-Ola Sunflower
100% Rye Rye-Ola Rye
100% Rye Rye-Ola Pumpernickle

Brownberry:
100% Whole Wheat
Natural 12 Grain
Natural Oatnut

Other brands:
Nature's Own 100% Whole Wheat
Mrs. Baird's 100% Whole Wheat
Roman Meal 100% Whole Wheat
Arnold 100% Whole Wheat dinner

Eat Fortified, Avoid Enriched
12/04/03

Have you ever seen foods labeled "Vitamin Fortified" and "Vitamin Enriched" and wondered, "What's the difference?"

When something is "fortified," nutrients that were never present in the original product have been added to make it healthier. Common examples include the addition of vitamin D to milk, calcium to orange juice, and soy milk and omega-3 fats to cereals.

When food is "enriched," nutrients that were lost or decreased during processing have been added back to the final product. For example, after creating white flour from wheat, manufacturers reintroduce B vitamins that were stripped during the refining process.

Does that make "enriched" foods healthy? Not really. According to Dr. Agatston, the added nutrients in enriched foods cannot compensate for the natural nutrients and fiber that were lost during the refining process. Fortified foods, on the other hand, still have their natural nutrients and fiber, and in most cases have an added benefit. So follow this general rule the next time you shop: Avoid enriched, eat fortified.

The Low-Carb Craze
02/19/04

In recent months, the media has been focusing its attention on low-carb diets, and food manufacturers are jumping on the bandwagon. Most grocery stores now have entire sections devoted to the many low-carb products available. What should you know about this trend, and how does it fit into the South Beach Diet?

First of all, you should be aware that the label "low-carb" is neither FDA-approved nor government-regulated. This means there is no standard for what makes a product "low-carb"—each company uses its own mathematical formula for calculating net carbohydrates. The FDA plans to suggest labeling guidelines for these products in the near future, but until regulations are in place, consumers will be in the dark about which products are true to their advertising.

For South Beach devotees, these labeling woes are not much of an issue. The South Beach Diet is not a low-carb diet—it emphasizes eating good carbs and good fats. Many "low-carb" products are high in saturated fats, trans fats, and large quantities of sugar alcohols, and you should be extremely cautious when deciding whether to purchase them. As always, you're better off buying whole, fresh foods or items that you know are SBD-approved.

EmilieB
09-10-2006, 01:33 PM
sugar is needed to make the yeast rise. as long as the sugar is 3 grams or less and the dietary fiber is 3g or higher you should be ok.



Low Sugar. A simple way to identify sugar in processed foods is to look for words ending in "ose," such as glucose, lactose, and sucrose. If any of these words appear in the first three ingredients listed, then the item is likely to be high in sugar and should be avoided.



I read this before I posted and that's exactly why I'm confused b/c HFCS IS in the first three ingredients listed yet this particular bread is recommended. :?:


RMT
09-10-2006, 02:28 PM
I buy Arnold 100% Whole Wheat Carb Counting

There is 1.5 g fat
Saturated Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 125 mg
Total Carbohydrate 9g
Dietary Fiber 3g
Sugar 0g
Protein 4g

Ingredients: Whole Wheat Flour , water, wheat gluten, oat fiber, yeast, wheat protein isolate, polydexrose, soybean oil, inulin, salt, wheat bran, mono-and digycerides, perservatives, monocalcuim, phosphate, sodium stearoly lactylate, grain, vinegar, malt, soy lechithin, sucralose

dont know if that helps you out at all. I can't find any hamburger buns that are sb approved - any suggestions??????

EmilieB
09-10-2006, 04:05 PM
I buy Arnold 100% Whole Wheat Carb Counting

There is 1.5 g fat
Saturated Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 125 mg
Total Carbohydrate 9g
Dietary Fiber 3g
Sugar 0g
Protein 4g

Ingredients: Whole Wheat Flour , water, wheat gluten, oat fiber, yeast, wheat protein isolate, polydexrose, soybean oil, inulin, salt, wheat bran, mono-and digycerides, perservatives, monocalcuim, phosphate, sodium stearoly lactylate, grain, vinegar, malt, soy lechithin, sucralose

dont know if that helps you out at all. I can't find any hamburger buns that are sb approved - any suggestions??????

Thanks, I'll have to look for that. Are polydextrose & sucralose artifical sweeteners? I've not heard of those ones before.

If bread is this hard to find then hamburger buns will likely be a mission impossible!!

ladybugnessa
09-10-2006, 04:08 PM
I get Hamburger and hot dog buns by Schmidt I believe. At Shoppers here in baltimore. no trans fat and 4 gm of dietary fiber per serving of course a serving is 53 grams and it's only supposed to be 30 so if you count that it's really 1 1/2 grains.

Barb0522
09-10-2006, 05:47 PM
For bread, I normally buy Natures Own 100% Whole Wheat. It has brown sugar as the third ingredient but the sugar amount is only 1 gram

For hamburger or hot dog buns, the best I have found is Nature's Own 100% Whole Wheat (sugar free). The ingredients are Stone ground whole wheat flour, water, maltitol, wheat gluten, yeast, contains 2% or less of each of the following (butter, salt, dough conditioners, cultured whey, vinegar, natural flavors, calcium sulfate, monocalcium phosphate, yeast food). Each bun is 110 calories.
Total fat 1.5 g
Saturated fat 1g
Transfat 0
polyunsaturated fat .5g
monounsaturated fat 0g
cholesterol 0
sodium 240 mg
Total carbohydrates 23g
dietary fiber 4g
sugars 0
maltitol 2g
protein 6g

Pepperidge Farms also makes a bun that is 100% whole wheat. It is a little higher in calories because it has a very small amount of sugar instead of the maltitol. I think either would be okay.

RMT
09-11-2006, 06:47 AM
Thanks Barb - will have to look into that suggestion!!!! I wanted to make steak sandwiches and fresh hamburgers this week - would like to have a bun with one (but not the other).

Can you find the Nature's Own brand anywhere or is hard to locate???

Barb0522
09-11-2006, 09:41 AM
I can only speak for Texas. It's a major brand that is available everywhere here. Not every store has the buns but most do.