100 lb. Club - Why I don't exercise . . . yet




View Full Version : Why I don't exercise . . . yet


Analystbyday
09-01-2006, 12:54 AM
I just posted this under the "tingly toes" thread, and I thought I'd start a new thread about it to get y'all's input.

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I'm totally with you on the toe tingling. For me it was always the worst when I was doing the stationary bike. I just fought through it, that is until I stopped working out.

I guess I'm not the best person to offer advise. I ended up changing my weight loss routine to all nutrition, and decided to wait until I was within 10 pounds of goal to return to exercise.

*Please don't read any further if exercise is an important component of your weight loss, I don't want anyone to get discouraged from a path that is working for them.*

My reasoning for stopping working out was this:
1. My weight loss (actual pound droppage) was slow if not non-existant.
2. While it's true that solely using nutrition for weight loss causes muscle loss as well. I don't need the same amount of muscle in a 140 lb. body as I do in a 260 lb. body so I would be gaining muscle just to lose it later anyway.
3. If I was working out I would get hungrier because I would need to fuel the exercising, and that would mean taking in more calories, which was a bit counter-productive.
4. Once you start working out you have to do more to keep getting results (more time, more intensity). So I would be doing quite a bit more exercise than that which would be maintainable by the time I got to goal.
5. Lastly there's the simple fact (and now that I've lost a bit of weight I've found it to be true) that exercise is a lot more challenging when I'm larger. I didn't want any potential dread of a workout to discourage me from reaching my goal.



Thoughts?


kykaree
09-01-2006, 01:59 AM
I disagree with you, but hey you have had great results, so if that works for you, fine.

However you asked for thoughts, so here are mine.

1. With exercise my weight loss has been slow - however my fat loss has been fast. What I am losing is fat, rather than muscle and water.

2. Muscle is metabolically active. It burns calories at rest. Therefore helps number one point, it also provides a little bulk and can help with the loose skin issue (this is a controversial point however my arms are a good example as I have lost a lot of inches there, and have no loose skin to speak of)

3. Exercise can be an appetite supressant in some people (not me) there are things you can do with your nutrition to ensure you are satisfied after exercising but not ready to eat a whole child thus throwing out your calorie defecit for the day. :D

4. You can raise intensity without spending more time. I exercise one hour 4 - 5 times a week and still get results, but I do work a lot harder now than I did 18 months ago. If you exercise consistently your body can start to want a higher level of intensity, and you naturally start upping the levels that your working at. At least that's true for me.

5. Dread is a state of mind. I love exercise, I didn't when I started, but I do now. At my heaviest I swam a lot, because I liked that, and it didn't hurt as much as weight bearing exercise, now I swim for a break or recreation but its not my main form of exercise.

An additional point, studies show regular exercisers are far more likely not to fall into the category of people who regain what they have lost.

And another, exercise for those of us who are at risk of getting, or already have, diabetes, is a a very good way of maintaining good levels of sugar and insulin in the blood, and also helps with circulation thus minimising the risk of diabetic complications.

I exercise because I don't want to be a thin person - I want to be a healthy person.

HarpoChicoGroucho
09-01-2006, 06:24 AM
These two posts show how dieting is different for everyone. I agree with kykaree, because I just feel myself getting flabbier when I'm not keeping up with my exercise, and if I don't exercise, I don't eat as much and I'd rather get to eat more.

There's a small percentage of the NWCR's members who don't consistently exercise and still keep their weight off (I think it may be 5%). So some people can get away with it, but most can't. And I always recommend exercise when advising people about weight loss.

I like to feel fit as well - it's important to me to be in shape, and I don't think I could just lose the weight and not work on improving my fitness.

But (analyst), you're working it!!!! Good for you!!


synger
09-01-2006, 09:39 AM
On the running boards, they often say the following:

Lose weight in the kitchen.
Get fit on the road.

Exercise by itself is not a good weight-loss plan (unless you are working all day in construction, or walking all day, or something constant like that). I've read articles about studies that show that when diet alone is compared to exercise alone, diet/exercise together, and no change, that the diet/exercise combo works much better. Exercise seems to be like a catalyst for weight loss, not a prime component.

What it does do, though, is make you more fit. A fit body is stronger, more flexible, and just all-around nicer to live in. Regular exercise helps with your digestion and elimination, it helps with sleep, it helps your blood pressure and heart health and mental acuity.

And I'm not talking huge amounts here. My doc says for someone my size, just 30 minutes 4 times a week is enough for "protective benefits." And I break that up into two 10-15 minute walks most days. (Though once I get the playroom organized again, I think I'll dig out the exercise tapes again. When I do them regularly, it's about 2-3 times a week for 30-45 minutes.) And it's a **** of a lot better than nothing!

When i don't exercise, I can feel every one of my 250+ pounds in my knees with each step up the stairs (or worse, down them). I can't twist and stretch as easily. I'm not as limber when I put on my shoes or get dressed. I fall back on some of my "fat lady tricks" to get myself clean in the shower, that I learned when I was pushing 300.

I much prefer my body when I'm exercising it regularly. I don't feel so much like it's a separate entity, and my enemy. I feel more like it's my partner and we're working together to make a healthier, slimmer Synger. When I just focus on food intake (which is, I admit, 90% of my plan), it's much more of a struggle, and I'm more likely to plateau or give up.

And you DON'T have to increase your exercise once your body gets used to the amount you're doing. You might want to, if you are working for a specific reason (like resistance training specifically to get stronger), but it's not necessary just for health maintenance. You can switch your workouts around to challenge your body, rather than just increasing hte same thing you're doing. For instance, I try to swim in the summer, and take walks at work, and I have a bunch of video tapes ranging from Tae-bo to cross-training to walking to dancing to Pilates... to fit whatever mood I'm in at the time. So I seldom get bored with my routine... because my routine changes.

Hope that makes sense. I guess my point is that diet alone will help you lose weight very well. But exercise will make that diet more effective, and has other health benefits that you may not want to overlook.

synger
09-01-2006, 09:43 AM
Oh, and as for tingly toes:

If you're talking about getting tingly toes as you exercise, I got that a lot when I started out. I talked to a professional sports shoe fitter about it (I did some running earlier this year). I got wider shoes, and longer laces, and laced them very loosely over the top of the foot, then a little tighter at the top to keep them on.

No more tingling.

tolose85
09-01-2006, 10:03 AM
eewwwoohhhh.. I can see this thread going places!

To each his own. What works for you may not work for another. We all have our reasons for doing certain things and while some of us may not agree with another person, it doesn't change the fact that something is working for you. Usually the only way to find out what will work is by trying it out. I know that exercise is an important part to my weight loss therefore, I do it. I know that reducing calories to 1000 because my metabolism is ok with it so I do it. I don't think that exercising is counter productive. I do think weight loss is like a hobby and a LOT of people will disagree with me on that one. There are lots of things to agree and disagree with. I guess it's all about what you want to accomplish with your weight loss. If its strictly weight loss then fine, exercise not as crucial. If you're looking for other health benefits, getting leaner, toner and having you muscles eat up some of the calories for you while you sleep then you definitely need the exercise. Either way, its a personal decision. And while I don't necessairly agree with most of the issues in question here, this is a great way to get to discuss things and view everyone's point of view. Its very interesting to say the least. I wish you success on your weight loss in which ever way you choose to go.

Charles78
09-01-2006, 11:03 AM
This is my opinion only - if what you are doing makes sense to you and it works - I would be the last person on earth to try and talk you out of it. There are many paths to a goal - each person has to find their own path.

Like I imagine most of us, when I started working on a new lifestyle 27 months ago, I was focused on hitting a number on the scale. I think that one of the big pitfalls of weight loss is the focus on losing pounds as fast as possible. Is my goal really to hit 220 pounds? I could really crank down my calorie, cut out my resistance training and exercise and lose this last 27 pounds in a hurry. When I stepped on the scale and it said 220 is that really the goal I am looking for? At what cost would hitting my goal that way come at? If I lose equal amounts of muscle and fat with a calorie restrictive diet then gain weight again - that weight will all come back as fat. I can end up at the same weight, but fatter as a percentage of body fat than when I started. Each time, I lower my RMR and make it harder to lose weight. That just sounds like a formula for long term failure to me.


When trying to lose fat weight, itís not just about the number on the scale!

You want to build habits that will last a lifetime. Our bodies were not designed to be as sedentary as modern society has us being. For the highest quality of life - we need good nutrition, food in appropriate portions and exercise. There is a guy I know that has lost 350 pounds on a calorie restrictive diet. His muscle has atrophied. I am so afraid what is going to happen to him when he goes back to eating.

bep
09-01-2006, 11:36 AM
In a sense, I can see what both of the first 2 posters points are. After some very discouraging attempts at my old TaeBo DVD's, I have decided to give up on that kind of stuff until I am much closer to my goal. But instead, I am keeping my exercises lighter. I like walking outside at a fast pace (close to 4 mph), or riding my exercise bike, or occassionally even getting on my treadmill. The harder toning work (for me) will just have to wait until I am closer to goal. I feel exercise is important...but at my weight, I want to have exercise I can manage instead of be discouraged by.

On a side note, I used to be able to do TaeBo OK, but then I had 2 close c-sections. I always say that those 2 c-sections took a lot of life out of me, but I think it is because I lost so much muscle mass during those couple years. Recovery was VERY long for me with both of them and for months afterwards even just fast walking would kill my incision site (had an infection with the first one). That area is no longer hurting me, but my whole body seems to have had the power sucked out of it. I was always quite tough growing up. Now...I know I am going to have to work hard to get that "life" back in me.

So, to wrap it up...I totally understand what poster #1 says about the exercise being really tough at this stage, but I also understand what poster #2 is saying about excersize. I guess I will have to say that my plan is smack between both of them. LOL!

midwife
09-01-2006, 11:39 AM
I exercise not just as an adjunct to weight loss, but for heart health and protective benefits against cancer. I exercise for stress relief and for energy to keep up with my kids. I run with my daughter (and dh), I go to Taekwondo with my son, and my legs have some fine muscles in them. I can fly up 2 levels of stairs and race down the hall to catch a baby and NOT be out of breath when I get there. I exercise for the satisfaction of setting and meeting goals (TKD belts, mileage, a half marathon in Oct).

So, reading your post does not discourage me. Rather, it prompted me to be an analyst myself, and evaluate why I exercise and what benefits I receive.

I hear all sorts of rationales for avoiding health behaviors; heck I'm sure I justified the times I chose to have a sedentary lifestyle with an ironclad theory. I'm glad it is working for you and I wish you continued success.

synger
09-01-2006, 11:43 AM
at my weight, I want to have exercise I can manage instead of be discouraged by.

Oh, definitely!! You have to find what works for you. Some people get really into a specific regimen, like resistance training, or yoga, or Pilates, where you "work out" a couple times a week. Some people prefer instead to incorporate more "life-style" exercise into their lives, like walking and stair-climbing and biking. Heck, just walking stopping a stop farther away in Metro and adding a three block walk at the beginning and end of my work day has done wonders for me. It doesn't even feel like "exercise" any more. It's just part of my life. Definitely, find what works for you at whatever point you are at in your journey. You only have to compete with yourself, after all.

nelie
09-01-2006, 11:55 AM
Let me tell you, at 360 lbs, exercising wasn't fun. Even at my current weight, exercising isn't always a picnic. I have found that I do best when I exercise. My eating tends to be better, my fat loss tends to be better and my overall mental health tends to be better. I have found though that I love weight training. I also love the elliptical. For outdoor activities, I love hiking. I used to get really bad pains in my shins/ankles when I walked so I tended to avoid walking as exercise as well as the treadmill. If you think not exercising works for you and you can lose weight and maintain that weight loss without exercising, then that is your choice.

Analystbyday
09-01-2006, 01:45 PM
My post seems to have hit a nerve with a few folks.

I guess I should have added in my reason for losing weight to begin with which may help with understanding my reasons for not working out:

Last year I was pregnant; my daughter ended up being born early and still because of an abrupted placenta. This was a fluke thing, and the doctor's have assured me that there was nothing that I did that caused it, but it does happen more often in overweight/obese women. So I decided to lose weight because when we try again, I want to give us the best odds we can get, that meant being smaller. Also since age will be a factor, I didn't want to wait years for everything to happen, so time was important.

Now before I get the comments saying that exercise would make me a healthier at a higher weight than just thinner & flabbier. I've always been healthy, and muscular (I carry my weight in my legs). And though I don't do proscribed exercise, I'm not inactive. I work in the yard, the house, go dancing, to amusement parks, and I'm a musician (violin/piano).

I guess my main reason for posting was not to say exercise is bad, I hope it didn't come off as that, but more that it was a question of timing when to begin. To all of those who do exercise, more power to ya!

Jen415
09-01-2006, 02:30 PM
I don't think anyone thought you were saying exercise is bad. It seems like what you are doing is working for you...so go for it!

famograham
09-01-2006, 02:43 PM
I like this discussion. :)

None of us is doing this exactly the same way. That's part of what I love so dearly about our group..we embrace each other's differences! I tend not to exercise...I know I should. I'm torn over the whole thing.

I see a lot of sense in your reasons Analyst, absolutely. I get that it's about the when...not the if.

I'd like to hear Howie's opinion...are ya here today Howie?

xoxox
:hug:
Linda

NotTheCheat
09-01-2006, 02:44 PM
For me, something I have realized recently is that there is definitely a balance to exercise. I had gotten really charged up about getting in a lot of exercise. While this was good, I started to push myself too hard. Instead of feeling full of energy I was drained all the time. Maybe if I had more time to sleep to make up for the extra effort it would have worked, but I didn’t have that kind of time flexibility. I started to think of it like calories. I used to think that the less you could eat the better your weight loss would be, which is not true. There is a calorie range that is optimal that gives you the right amount of nutrients and energy while maintaining a decent deficit. I think the same thing is probably true of exercise. There is an optimal range for everyone depending on their fitness level, nutrition, sleep, other stress factors, etc. I think some exercise is better than none for the amazing benefits it brings, but that doesn’t mean that more exercise is always better. Finding the right balance is the key and it is something that will be constantly changing.

Jen415
09-01-2006, 02:47 PM
Now that makes sense to me--finding a balance between the two, where neither of them (diet or exercise) is extreme!

BreakingFree
09-01-2006, 02:49 PM
analyst -

:hug:. So, so sorry to hear about your daughter. I can't imagine how painful that must be for you.

Take good care of yourself.

kykaree
09-03-2006, 03:58 AM
I, too, am sorry to hear about your daughter. As someone who has had recurrent miscarriages (and not gone on to have a child) I feel for you. :hug: and I do hope that you have the child you want so much.

I hope you didn't think you'd hit a nerve with me, I can see the benefits of not exercising in a formal sense, and it's obviously working for you! I'm really committed to what I'm doing, but I've seen many larger people leave our gym over the time of my membership, because of the feelings that they are not being supported and that they are being judged. My gym is very fat unfriendly despite having a large membership of obese people. Actually it's just unfriendly!

I never thought you were a lazy lump :D You look very fit in your avatar!

Heather
09-03-2006, 12:49 PM
Personally, I exercise regularly, even though on the whole I don’t like doing it most of the time (getting myself dressed to exercise is usually the hardest part). I have done a lot of reading on the topic and determined that exercise is helpful for ALL people, and that I need to do it in order to have a healthy body, no matter what my weight. So, I make myself exercise.

You can certainly do whatever you want. You don't have to exercise to lose weight, though I believe it helps. If you don't want to exercise, no one is making you.

However, I am a little confused about your reasons WHY you are not exercising... and you did ask for thoughts, so...

My reasoning for stopping working out was this:
1. My weight loss (actual pound droppage) was slow if not non-existant.


If your weight loss was slow, why would stopping exercise help? It burns calories, and weight training builds muscle, which is metabolically active and burns more calories even when you aren't exercising. It would seem exercise can help speed weight loss.

Yes, adding muscle might add a bit of weight, but is the point to lose weight no matter what, or is the point to lose fat? Pound for pound, muscle takes up significantly less space than fat. Consider 2 people who weigh 180 pounds – one has worked out, weight lifted and has a lot of muscle. The other has very little muscle. Other than that, they are the same height, same body type, etc. The one with more muscle will be smaller (and fit into smaller clothes) than the one with less muscle, who will be flabbier, and, by definition, have more fat, than the one who exercised.

Also, building muscle can be beneficial for your body in many ways, making you stronger, less likely to suffer injury, etc…

2. While it's true that solely using nutrition for weight loss causes muscle loss as well. I don't need the same amount of muscle in a 140 lb. body as I do in a 260 lb. body so I would be gaining muscle just to lose it later anyway.

I don't know that the gaining muscle now to lose it later argument makes sense. If the goal is to decrease the percent of fat in your body, why wouldn't building muscle be a good thing? Sure, you might "lose" some of the muscle, but lets say you started with 10 pounds of muscle (I'm making that up) and through weight loss lose 3 pounds of muscle, being left with 7... But if you exercised and gained 3 pounds of muscle along the way, at the end you have 10 pounds of muscle on a smaller, fitter body, and less % body fat. Now you not only have that muscle and are fitter, you look better too! (see above)

I guess I just can't see how building muscle as you lose is a bad thing.

3. If I was working out I would get hungrier because I would need to fuel the exercising, and that would mean taking in more calories, which was a bit counter-productive.

Yes, you might need more calories if you exercise, but not everyone finds that they get hungrier… or, let’s say you burn 300 calories, you aren’t necessarily 300 calories hungrier. I have found I change the KIND of calories I eat makes a big difference – eat more protein and less fat, and you need fewer calories to satisfy you. In other words, consider how diet and exercise work together.

And you can look at it this way, burning 300 calories with exercise could get you 300 calories closer to your goal.

4. Once you start working out you have to do more to keep getting results (more time, more intensity). So I would be doing quite a bit more exercise than that which would be maintainable by the time I got to goal.

I don’t know if you have to do more time AND intensity to see results… I still weight lift the for about the same amount of time, but I lift more in that time.

And, yes, overall, I do more TIME than I did initially, but it doesn’t follow that it has to be more than is maintainable. You do what you can.


5. Lastly there's the simple fact (and now that I've lost a bit of weight I've found it to be true) that exercise is a lot more challenging when I'm larger. I didn't want any potential dread of a workout to discourage me from reaching my goal.

Sure, exercise is harder when you’re larger, but perhaps all the more reason to teach yourself you can do it. Why not make your heart and lungs healthier, to lower blood pressure, build muscle?

In all of this, it basically sounds like you are trying to talk yourself out of exercise, and putting yourself at risk to gain the weight back in the long run. Frankly, it sounds like you don't like exercise and you’re making excuses. That certainly sounds familiar to me, as that's what I can still tend to.

Again, if you choose not to exercise, fine. But your arguments don’t necessarily make sense and seem to go against our understanding of how exercise works.

I hope you aren't offended by my response, but you asked for thoughts.

rochemist
09-03-2006, 02:03 PM
Now that makes sense to me--finding a balance between the two, where neither of them (diet or exercise) is extreme!

That is truth for me! And also I have found its easier to stay focused on trying love myself with food if I am also loving my body through movement. I think people get caught up in what that movement is. I love to swim and be in the water, so water aerobics is a natural choice for me. I love the physical, spiritual, and emotional control of Yoga so also a natural choice for me. And I love, love, love to dance who thought it was excercise :lol:

The other beautiful thing about excercise is the acceptance, look at how this body serves me today. It holds me, allows my breath, it stretches, all the damage I cause my body and it still serves me. Absolutely wonderful.

Just my two cents!
Miss Chris

WhitWhit
09-03-2006, 02:21 PM
My thoughts...

1) I know from experience that once you stop exercising as intensly, the weight comes right back. I ran track in high school and really had nothing to worry about. When I got to college I did not compete, and I gained weight. So I started running on my own to lose weight. At first it was 1 mile, then 2, then I was up to 4-5 miles at least four days per week. I went from 175lbs to 134lbs in no time. I was a size four and I looked great! Then I got busy with an intense schedule, I wasn't able to run nearly as much and I soon found my weight balloon up to 155lbs.

2) As an African-American woman, exercising for me is MUCH different than it is for White women. My main concern is hair. I have relaxed (straightened) hair. When I exercise, I sweat. Sweat totally ruins my hair. I cannot wash my hair daily because it will strip it of oils...it will become dry, brittle, and will slowly fall out. Also, in order to maintain healthy hair, I go to the salon every two weeks - which costs $35 every visit! I just started my healthy makeover last week. I exercised Mon-Thurs and of course my hair was a wreck. Honestly, my hair does not allow me to engage in intense workouts.

3) I am 25 and after losing 15-30 pounds about 5 times, I now realize that in order to keep it off, I have to work out forever. Well, I have to be honest with myself -- I am not going to maintain an intense workout for the next 30 years! I plan to eat healthy and do some type of exercise daily (crunches, short walks, weights at home).

4) It is obvious that weight loss and maintaining a healthy weight comes down to how much you eat. Just look at people that get gastric bypass surgery! Just look at anorexics! (Ok, bad example, but you get the point.) Like my 89 year old grandmother said this summer when I complained about my weight: "Just push away from the table." She did not tell me to go workout. And she is a woman in great health! Healthy weight, normal blood pressure, no cancers or diabetes or anything!

Everyone is different and must be realistic.

kykaree
09-03-2006, 05:36 PM
I now realize that in order to keep it off, I have to work out forever. Well, I have to be honest with myself -- I am not going to maintain an intense workout for the next 30 years! I plan to eat healthy and do some type of exercise daily (crunches, short walks, weights at home).


Yes, exactly. Exercise is a bit like a puppy, it's not just for Christmas. You don't exercise just to get the weight off, it has to be a lifelong habit for you to keep it off forever. When I started exercising 18 months ago, I made a lifelong commitment to always do it, in one form or another. I don't think anyone is talking about necessarily running marathons (although some of us do that!), or spending ages at the gym doing cardio and weights (though a lot of us do that too). Any exercise is valid, whether it be in a gym, up a hill, in a pool, in your living room.......

I hate to say it, but this is the 100lb club. Having 30 pounds to lose is a big thing, don't get me wrong, but having 100lb or 200lb to lose and keep off forever is a slightly different proposition, to my mind.

Correcting for what many of us is years of morbid obesity takes a lot of work, and for a lot of us, a lot of exercise, and a commitment to completely changing our lifestyles forever not just whilst we lose weight.

card
09-03-2006, 05:56 PM
I don't do well with formal exercise, hate it, hate it, hate it, will think of a million and one excuses to get out of it. But... mowing the grass is exercise, raking the leaves is exercise, shovelling snow is exercise, walking to work is exercise, chasing the teenagers with a broom is exercise, just kidding. I think the point is if you are active you are getting exercise even if you are not doing a formal workout.

jillybean720
09-03-2006, 07:15 PM
I HATE exercise. I truly do--with a burning passion. I hate sweating, I hate feeling tired, I hate the gym, I hate exercising at home since my apartment is on a higher floor and everything shakes when I'm moving around, I hate trying to make time for it, I hate having to change clothes and possibly shower again, I hate lifting weights (boooooring!), I hate walking around my neighborhood (WAY too many creepy people)...I am the queen of excuses when it comes to exercise! However, despite all that hate (and I really don't use the word "hate" about very many things), I can't help but agree with every word wyllen wrote. She made fabulous comments, and I'd like to just add a couple more...
1) I know from experience that once you stop exercising as intensly, the weight comes right back. I disagree--you have to find the balance. If you stop exercising as much (i.e., burning as many calories), then you need to adjust your food intake accordingly, that's all. If you're burning 300 fewer calories per day due to decreased activity, then you give up your evening snack and have a smaller portion of food at dinner (or whatever you need to do personally to compensate). Also, the amount of exercise you do to lose weight does NOT have to be the same as to maintain. Obviously, when you reach your goal, you no longer have to burn as many calories since you're no longer working to create a deficit, just a balance. You can either slow down the intensity a little or cut back on some of the time you spend on your workouts. And, again, should you give it up completely, yuo can compensate with your food intake (just be wary that some of your toned muscle might turn back into jiggle!).
2) As an African-American woman, exercising for me is MUCH different than it is for White women. My main concern is hair. I have relaxed (straightened) hair. When I exercise, I sweat. Sweat totally ruins my hair. I cannot wash my hair daily because it will strip it of oils...it will become dry, brittle, and will slowly fall out. Also, in order to maintain healthy hair, I go to the salon every two weeks - which costs $35 every visit! I just started my healthy makeover last week. I exercised Mon-Thurs and of course my hair was a wreck. Honestly, my hair does not allow me to engage in intense workouts. I'm not African American (as is obvious from my avatar photo), nor do I have my hair straightened or anything. All I can say about this is that my body is a higher priority to me than my hair, but to each his/her own. However, a simple solution might be to do more easygoing workouts. If you want to exercise an hour a day, that's fine, but did you know you could get the same health benfits by breaking it up into multiple 15-20 minute sessions throughout the day instead of killing yourself all at once? Also, there are lots of things you can do to increase flexibility, strength, and blood flow that do not require heavy sweating, such as yoga, exercises on a stability ball, etc. You don't have to sweat like crazy to get health benfits since sweat is just water leaving your body, not fat ;) You don't have to run or jazzercise your way to a healthier, thinner body--you can lift light weights to tone, go for an evening stroll, anything to getyour body MOVING :)
3) I am 25 and after losing 15-30 pounds about 5 times, I now realize that in order to keep it off, I have to work out forever. Well, I have to be honest with myself -- I am not going to maintain an intense workout for the next 30 years! I plan to eat healthy and do some type of exercise daily (crunches, short walks, weights at home). Who said you needed to do "an intense workout?" Going out for a walk seems maintainable. Doing housework or yardwork seems maintainable. ANY activity that burns calories is all you need--you don't have to kill yourself for hours on end every day ;) You do what you can. If you go from not doing any exercise just to walking around your block for 15 minutes at a time maybe 4 times a week, it'll make a difference!
4) It is obvious that weight loss and maintaining a healthy weight comes down to how much you eat. Just look at people that get gastric bypass surgery! Just look at anorexics! (Ok, bad example, but you get the point.) Like my 89 year old grandmother said this summer when I complained about my weight: "Just push away from the table." She did not tell me to go workout. And she is a woman in great health! Healthy weight, normal blood pressure, no cancers or diabetes or anything! I don't think anyone here actually has said you NEED exercise to lose weight. I have been avoiding intentional exercise like the plague, and I've still been losing weight. However, I don't want to get ot my goal and be 150 pounds of saggy, squishy flab and have to cram myself into a size 14. I want to be toned and more solid so at that same weight, I can possible fit comfortably into a size 10 instead. The simple fact (to me) is that to bethe size I want to be yet flabby, I have to weigh MUCH less than to be that size when I'm fit.

I completely agree that everyone should do what works for them. I also think it's fabulous that at least the original poster who started this thread says she's not exercising YET, but that she WILL be doing it. She may be procrastinating, but at least she's not completely avoiding :^: And, as others have mentioned, I don't say any of this to offend anyone (if it's offensive, then I should be offended as well, since I currently do not work out...ever :dizzy: ).

WhitWhit
09-03-2006, 07:49 PM
I hate to say it, but this is the 100lb club. Having 30 pounds to lose is a big thing, don't get me wrong, but having 100lb or 200lb to lose and keep off forever is a slightly different proposition, to my mind.



My sincere apologies for "invading" your club. When I log on, I select "New Posts." I saw, "Why I don't exercise" and simply ignored that the thread was in a club.

All I was trying to do was lend some support to the original poster. I just understand why she doesn't want to exercise and I wanted to share my experience. I haven't been on 3FC long, and I thought the purpose was sharing. Now I know to stay out of certain clubs.

Best wishes!

WhitWhit
09-03-2006, 07:55 PM
I'm not African American (as is obvious from my avatar photo), nor do I have my hair straightened or anything. All I can say about this is that my body is a higher priority to me than my hair, but to each his/her own.

Exactly, you are not African American so I would not expect you to understand the difficulties that I face with my hair. And my entire image is important to me, not just my body. So my hair, body, makeup, clothes, accessories, all need to be correct. I'm sorry, but if I can get decent results eating healthy without ruining my hair, then so be it. In my field, I cannot arrive in front of a client with unkept hair. Like the original poster listed her issues, I chose to list mine.

Again, my apologies for invading the club. I will find other clubs.

Best wishes.

Charles78
09-03-2006, 08:17 PM
Exactly, you are not African American so I would not expect you to understand the difficulties that I face with my hair. And my entire image is important to me, not just my body. So my hair, body, makeup, clothes, accessories, all need to be correct. I'm sorry, but if I can get decent results eating healthy without ruining my hair, then so be it. In my field, I cannot arrive in front of a client with unkept hair. Like the original poster listed her issues, I chose to list mine.

Again, my apologies for invading the club. I will find other clubs.

Best wishes.


The written word is hard to pick up "tone" from. Please don't feel like you "invaded" anything. You are very welcome here. We all have goals to reach and different priorities. That is OK :) We all can help each other reach our goals. There are many paths to fitness. We each have to find our own.

I wish you the very best!

jillybean720
09-03-2006, 10:02 PM
Again, my apologies for invading the club. I will find other clubs.
Honey, no one told you to go away...everyone is free to post anywhere where a topic interests them :) I think one thing I gathered from the mention of more weight to lose vs. less is simply that when you're much more overweight, you've got much more extra fat, so it may be harder to look fit instead of flabby when you reach your goal without regular exercise. As for the hair, as I said, to each his/her own, plus I went on to try and offer suitable solutions. Just as you posted your issues, everyone else posts theirs. Just because they disagree or point out things to the contrary doesn't mean you are wrong. I think almost every post here ends with something along the lines of "no offense intended to anyone" or "different things work for different people." No need to get defensive--no one here is being attacked :^:

beautifulone
09-04-2006, 06:08 PM
I'd like to echo a few things :) and EVERYONE, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE KEEP IN MIND THAT THIS IS ALL WRITTEN WITH AN INTENDED TONE OF FRIENDLINES RATHER THAN OFFENSE.

Firstly, and this is especially to WhitWhit - please post wherever you'd like to. The 100lb forum (or any as far as I know) is NOT a closed community for people of certain weights. I think it's interesting to share experiences of our individual weight losses, there is a lot to learn and gain from it. I do think that the challenges that accompany losing 30 lbs versus 50 lbs versus 100 lbs versus etc, and keeping them off are different. I know myself when I see people with less than 60 pounds to lose, especially around 30, I think "oh my goodness they are so lucky especially to be starting at that weight" - but realistically, I know that it is all relative and we all need support regardless of where we are in relation to our goals.
You have not invaded this community nor do you have to avoid it - as Charles has said, you are most welcome here and I hope that what seems like a misunderstanding won't create a drift :)

Analyst - When I think about it, I think my major desire/hope for weight loss is that it is a healthy process. Healthy mind, healthy body, healthy journey. I want people to be happy, to create and lead love-filled joyful lives for themselves, and I feel like having a loving relationships with ourselves physically is an important part of that. I like to exercise I am discovering, I like feeling physically strong, I like being able to participate in new activities because my physical strength enables me to do so. I like the lean look of a physically toned and fit body, I like the idea of being able to eat more calories during the day. I love that exercising makes it much easier for me to not eat unhealthy foods. I like having something stable in my life, like working out, at a time when not much else is stable. And most of all, I like that this stability is POSITIVE. I'm sure there are more reasons I haven't listed, and I hope they'll only come in abundance as I continue to exercise.
So those are my reasons and mine alone :) I don't hold anyone else by them. I do find it a bit hard at my weight sometimes, and I love the idea that it will get easier - but I find it totally do-able and totally worth it.

I think it's great that you've lost so much weight already - I am sure you have done your body a favour :D I also commend your attitude of recognizing what YOU need to do for yourself and doing it - doing what you can do as you can do it. That's the thing about losing weight, there is no one formula that fits all people. Our bodies are differently shaped, with different needs, desires, preferences, abilities, and set points. I obviously recommend exercise to anyone so I think it's great you plan on doing it in the future. I hope it will be a more comfortable and positive experience for you then!

Thanks for starting this thread ~Analyst. Although it's become a little touchy, I love reading what people have written and I think it reinforces the idea that we need to remember which is definitely, to each her/his own. I like when our posts take on supportive and encouraging tones, I think that's by far the most special and warming thing about 3FC - you hear it in so many newbie posts, so I hope we can continue to respond in that manner. We're all here for the same reasons... and to quote (or paraphrase) one of my favourite books, "We are as strong as we stand united". Rarely if ever does someone come along who wants to offend someone else or make them feel badly on these threads I think, which means that most posts are written with good intent and well-meaning. Whether they are interpreted that way or not by each person is another matter. As Charles said, it can be difficult to ascertain someone's intended tone or meaning through the written word. I think it's fair to trust that generally, people here try to be helpful in their own ways rather than do harm :)

Now everyone, here are some hugs and group cheer :grouphug:!!

Analystbyday
09-10-2006, 01:20 AM
This thread may be done by now (I was on vacation so wasn't checking in), but I wanted to respond to some responses :)

Really thanks for reading, and it's great to see everyone's point of view on this.




If your weight loss was slow, why would stopping exercise help? It burns calories, and weight training builds muscle, which is metabolically active and burns more calories even when you aren't exercising. It would seem exercise can help speed weight loss.

I can only say that in my anecdotal experience, after working out diligently for 3 months I lost a pound.




Yes, adding muscle might add a bit of weight, but is the point to lose weight no matter what, or is the point to lose fat? Pound for pound, muscle takes up significantly less space than fat. Consider 2 people who weigh 180 pounds – one has worked out, weight lifted and has a lot of muscle. The other has very little muscle. Other than that, they are the same height, same body type, etc. The one with more muscle will be smaller (and fit into smaller clothes) than the one with less muscle, who will be flabbier, and, by definition, have more fat, than the one who exercised.


All completely true, but I didn't want to be a low fat percentage 260 pound person, the analogy works well for 180 but not 260.



Also, building muscle can be beneficial for your body in many ways, making you stronger, less likely to suffer injury, etc…


I completely agree. I wasn't saying I'll never exercise, just postpone it a little.



I don't know that the gaining muscle now to lose it later argument makes sense. If the goal is to decrease the percent of fat in your body, why wouldn't building muscle be a good thing? Sure, you might "lose" some of the muscle, but lets say you started with 10 pounds of muscle (I'm making that up) and through weight loss lose 3 pounds of muscle, being left with 7... But if you exercised and gained 3 pounds of muscle along the way, at the end you have 10 pounds of muscle on a smaller, fitter body, and less % body fat. Now you not only have that muscle and are fitter, you look better too! (see above)


First, I apologize I'm a math person, truly everyone feel free to ignore this

At 260 pounds we'll assume 42% body fat, thus a 58% lean body mass (used a BMI calculator, though I think the fat is a little high). So that means I had 150 pounds of lean body mass. My goal is 140 pounds with ~20% body fat (I want to keep my period, since I'm going to be trying to get pregnant again). that would mean a lean body mass of 110 pounds. Meaning I would be losing 40 pounds of lean body mass. Thus my whole argument of gaining muscle to lose it again.

I lose ~3 pounds a week, and they say if you lose over 2 pounds a week you're losing muscle, which would put me at a 2:1, fat:muscle ratio of loss. Thus losing 80 pounds of fat and 40 pounds of muscle, puts me right at goal with the right %. Wow I said "thus" a few times too many there.



In all of this, it basically sounds like you are trying to talk yourself out of exercise, and putting yourself at risk to gain the weight back in the long run. Frankly, it sounds like you don't like exercise and you’re making excuses. That certainly sounds familiar to me, as that's what I can still tend to.

Again, if you choose not to exercise, fine. But your arguments don’t necessarily make sense and seem to go against our understanding of how exercise works.


I actually like to work out it just wasn't helping me with my goal, which I had put in an earlier post in this thread. Time is important, and it was just slowing the results.


I hope you aren't offended by my response, but you asked for thoughts.

Not at all, and thanks for taking the time to read and think and post!!

I do love this board.

Idealmuse
09-14-2006, 02:38 AM
Hi there -

I think eveyone has different reasons and different things that work for them, but I just wanted to chime in some because I've lost weight both ways before. There are lots of points to bring up that I think people already hit on the head so I won't repeat those points rather I'll just relay my experience. Not to say that your way was wrong but I think it's important for people to hear both sides when deciding to include exercise into their program or not.

Like many others I lost weight quickly on a very low calorie diet. My particular one was called "Seattle Sutton" basically 1000 calories a day they give the food like TV dinners but it's fresh food all nutritionally balanced. In a few months I lost QUICKLY 50lbs... but as soon as I stopped eatting the food I gained back. I didn't gain it all back, but yes the bulk of it. I started at 270 and made it all the way down to 220 or so. It came back very quickly I do think partially because of the muscle mass I lost.

I also have lost weight doing exercise only and not food restricting. Walking to work 3-6 miles a day. While that worked too, it wasn't as quick. I think again I got down to 220 or so from 260 this time. But again walking was boring to me and too time consuming and I wasn't really building muscle or anything so when i stopped because I hadn't altered my eatting it all came back.

And then the dreaded "All came back And PLUS some happened"

Finally this summer I hit my all-time high which was a number I never wanted to see, and I knew SOMETHING had to be done. I was even in a place in my head where I was considering surgury, but I knew deep down I could do it because I had done it before. Not to my goal weight, but that was because I kept quitting and resenting I couldn't eat like "normal people" or whatever.

So I decided to get a DVD player and research DVDs to do at home because I was tired of wasting money on a gym I never went to. Then I decided for the first time in my life I wasn't just going to Lose weight I was going to get fit too, so I started alternating cardio with weight training. At the beginning I couldnt do much. I was doing walk away the pounds and the biggest loser DVD, but within a few weeks the changes that started happening were amazing, and I progressed onto DVDs like Jari Love, and Turbo Jam.

So It's been 3 months now. I've lost 35lbs already, BUT I know I've gained muscle I don't know how much but I can feel A LOT of it under there so I've lost more fat then that. I am wearing clothing that fit me when I was atleast 15lbs lighter then I am now. The HUGE thing is it's helped my mood tremedously. I stopped taking anti-depression meds even and even though I am 266 now I feel so so so much better. Like someone said in an ealier comment it's like me and my body are connected once again.

I do watch my intake, but because I exercise I can eat quite well on the days I exercise (1700-2000 calories a day) and still lose weight on average 2lbs a week for the past 3+months. I record my food on an online site... basically try and make better choices, and stick to a predetermined calorie range as much as possible. On days I dont exercise my target is much lower (about 1450 but that will lower as I lose weight)

(Continued on next post - sorry so long)

Idealmuse
09-14-2006, 02:47 AM
Lost my train of thought there...

Anyway yes exercise isn't the easiest thing to do when your this heavy, but it does get easier as you lose and get stronger. If you find something you don't mind doing it makes life so much easier, because otherwise you won't keep at it. I never liked exercise, but now I can tolerate it because some of the DVDs I do are Fun and there lots of variety.

Like the original poster mentioned she does do active things like gardening, so even if you can find things like that that make you happy... that's still exercise.

So for me they key to losing it this last time and what will be forever has been a balance of both. Can you do it doing one or the other? yes, but you can make life easier by finding that balance.

All I know is that weighing what I do I feel a WORLD of difference having somehwhat of a base of fitness now. Those first few weeks are HARD it ends up being so worth it.

I have a long road ahead of me... seriously though I rather be "overweight" and fit even if it mean I am slightly heavier then my original goal, because I know in the end I will still be SMALLER then if I hit my target and was flabby weak and still tired all the time.

Okay end of that... I'm usually a girl of few words but this is very close to my heart as it's been a life long struggle for me, and I'm seeing the light at the end even though it's a ways off and if I can help share that with anyone else then that would make me happy.

-Muse

Jen415
09-14-2006, 04:12 PM
Muse, that was a GREAT post!!

4me2006
09-17-2006, 10:38 AM
I feel the same way as you about waiting to exercise.i find it alot easier to lose some weight first.i know there are lots of health reasons for exercising but i never benefit from it because i get discouraged and give up.i'm going to wait until i lose some weight first.

Margaret
09-17-2006, 09:43 PM
I started a weight loss program 12 weeks ago and have lost 43 pounds so far, but I've been unable to exercise much so far because of some excruciating back problems. Last week, my doctor at UCLA's Risk Factor Obesity Program told me that without exercising, I'd be losing 70% muscle/30% fat and he wanted me to find SOME kind of exercise I could do, if only just walking around in a pool for 30 minutes 3 times a week, so that I could slow down the muscle loss and maximize the fat loss. He said that he's never had a patient gain muscle mass while actually losing weight--that what I should shoot for is just not to lose any more muscle than I will, anyway, because when I finally get where I want to get, about another 75 lbs, and start maintenance (for the rest of my life if I'm very, very good), I'm going to need whatever muscle I haven't lost just to keep my metabolism ticking over. So I found a water exercise program for people with arthritis (me!) and I ordered this thingie I saw on tv called a Bean that supports the back while allowing you to exercise (and deflates and folds up into your drawer when you can't stand it any more). Because I have degenerative disc disease and arthritis, (and excruciating sciatica at the moment), I have to be a little creative but I've tried losing without exercising and losing with exercising and I've had more success with...until my six miles a day herniated a disc...oh, well...We all do the best we can, and the fact that we're doing anything is way better than just rolling over and giving up!!! You're all very inspiring. :)

Idealmuse
09-20-2006, 01:50 AM
WOW 70/30? That surprises me I had no idea it was that high of a ratio!

Although to be honest I am shocked he said He said that he's never had a patient gain muscle mass while actually losing weight.

He either never had someone who really was dedicated to trying or he has never tested people, because I can with 200 percent sureness tell you i've gained some mad muscle where there was very very little.

There is a HUGE difference. I really wish I had testing done before. Maybe it's because my conditioning was so bad or maybe because I w/o 6 days a week, but let me assure you it IS possible if you push the muscle to exhaustion. It's not the ideal situation for muscle gain, but you can work with it. I probably gain slower then someone who was bulking up on calories, but slow is fine it's still doing me so much better.