100 lb. Club - New Puppy!!!




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Sandi
07-03-2006, 12:00 AM
Ok, so I got this big idea that it was time to get a puppy!! Welcome Bailey, an 8 week old soft Coated Wheaton Terrior!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/kahuna23/newbailey.jpg

He seems to be a good dog so far. We are going through the usual housebreaking and chewing issues. I can deal with that. What is killing me is the Barking / Yelping / Howling all night when we crate him. We have newspaper and a chew toy in there and I even have the radio on & a dim light. Last night it went on for 1 1/2 hours straight before I checked on him and found he had gotten himself so upset he had thrown up in his crate. After bathing him and cleaning his crate, he was back at it for almost 35 mins before he settled. I NEED SLEEP!!! I am up right now because he is down there going crazy. It's only been 20 mins so far. I can't even believe Jacob sleeps through this!!

I don't know what he is going to do when I go back to work on Wednesday?!?! Tell me this passes. I have never had a dog. I mean we had them growing up, but I don't ever remember any of this!


Raelynn
07-03-2006, 01:10 AM
Awww he's adorable! I hope he settles down tonight so you get some sleep!

trishn222
07-03-2006, 01:18 AM
They do settle down. I had even forgotten how bad the first couple of weeks were until I had to puppy sit my sisters fairly new puppy a couple of weeks ago. I do say this too shall pass. My dog that we have had for about 2 1/2 years now only yips if he needs to go out. He never does in the middle of the night as long as we put him out right before bed. The puppy will get it and I must say he is adorable.

Trish


SuchAPrettyFace
07-03-2006, 01:20 AM
It passes, and here is how:

You can't crate him at night. I'm sorry, but those are the breaks.

You need a box or doggie bed in your bedroom to put him in. He needs to be near you & dogs do not really like anything over their heads. My boy sleeps on a pillow next to the bed. He has an extra bowl of water there, too. You might want to hold off on that until your boy is potty trained, though.

Also, there is too much in there. He doesn't need the radio & the light & the chew toy & all that; it's just distracting to him. All he needs is a warm blanket to snuggle up to. BUT, dogs are social, so he needs to be near you & Steve. I would suggest putting him in your room. Don't try to make him go to bed before you're ready to be in your room. He will know you're awake & won't be buying it. ALSO, DON'T get into the habit of letting him sleep in the bed with you guys. It's easier to never let that happen than to try & get a dog to sleep in their own bed later on down the line.

I forgot, the only thing he might want in his bed is a clock that ticks. It will remind him of his mother's heart beating, which is what he's been snuggling up to for the past 8 weeks.

Also with you going back to work on Wednesday, he will be in a crate all day, you won't want him to be in there at night & he won't want to be in there either.

So that's it: Keep It Simple, Sweetie. :) If you need anything else, don't hesitate to ask. My boy just turned 14 years old 2 weeks ago. :love:

karistiana
07-03-2006, 04:04 AM
Awww he is adorable! Great advice from SuchAPrettyFace, I second that. We learned about the clock thing with my cocker spaniel puppy years ago. He would whine, bark, and whine at night too even with me sleeping in the same room as him, altho he wasn't quite as bad with me in there, but we put a stuffed animal in his bed with one of those wind up ticking clocks underneath it, and he'd curl right up to it and sleep! Oh that was wonderfully. Then they get to a point when they don't need it anymore of course, but it eases the transition from mommy dog I think. Oh and of course make sure the alarm isn't set and on when you do that lol.

Charbar
07-03-2006, 07:31 AM
Sandi.. he is so sweet! How big will he get? Will he be your new exercise?

Lyndyn
07-03-2006, 09:07 AM
Sorry to disagree with the other poster, but....You can crate him at night....actually, the crate plays into a dog's natural "denning" instinct. It is a VERY good idea to do crate training properly. Just like anything, there is a RIGHT way and a wrong, abusive way to do it. Git yerself some education, girly - you will be glad you did!

Trust me...this puppy stage is not the hard one...when the pup is a little older, he will get his big boy teeth...just like a baby who is in pain when teething so will the puppy be...he will start chewing on everything big time...He isn't being bad...he is IN PAIN.

It won't last very long, but it will be intense...you will be glad that you took the time to do crate training when he was a little guy (and so will he!)

In fact, one of the sure signs that my golden isn't feeling well is when he goes into his crate and hangs out. (We haven't had the heart to put it away because it is "his place" so, there it is in the dining room!)


Get yourself a good book. I recommend Raising Rover by Judith Halliburton. Check your library for it or there are many others...

Check out this link:
www.barkbytes.com/training/crate.htm

(I've worked with a dog rescue group for years - I've fostered over 60 dogs of all ages from tiny pups up to seniors.)

Good luck! It does get better...Just remember:
A tired puppy is a good puppy.

Lifeguard
07-03-2006, 09:12 AM
Very cute!

Our dog never accepted kennel training. We tried everything but once we stopped she settled right down. She was older though, when we got her.

If the barking continues we discovered they have collars you can put on them to train them out of barking. One sprays citronella & the other gives them a small shock whenever they bark. The citronella one didn't work at all for us but the shock one worked like a charm. She only barked once & then she stopped. Before long we didn't even use the collar at all & she almost never barks now, except when someone is outside of the house. I was able to rent the citronella one from the vet clinic.

Good luck! & enjoy the cutie!

Lyndyn
07-03-2006, 09:21 AM
The barking and crying is a natural reaction that a puppy has to being seperated from his litter. Dogs are pack animals...they don't like to be alone. YOU and your family will become the NEW pack...just give it a few days. First, make sure that the puppy has done his business (don't let him drink a bowl full of water before bed). Don't put the crate in the garage or basement. If you put the crate near your bed, he will be aware of you, but contained. Then IGNORE IGNORE IGNORE the pooch's sad sounds. If you don't ignore them, it actually REINFORCES the dog making them. They are very smart (esp. terriers!) and they will learn...ok, I only have to cry for 45 minutes and she will take me to bed with her.

After less than a week (usually about three days in my experience), the puppy will start to settle into his new routine and will pipe down...but NOT if you keep checking on him, talking to him, even LOOKING at him can reinforce a behavior.

Now, all that said...there are a lot of roads that lead to Rome...and a lot of ways of living with a dog...I'm suggesting one of the easier ones that ends up with less people booting the dog out to the curb. (I see this kind of thing a lot.) Trust me, it is much much easier to train a new puppy to use the crate than it will be to train him to use it when he is six or nine months old and eating every thing that you own.

Puppies are fun, though!! :0)

barbygirl43
07-03-2006, 09:32 AM
He is so cute. I have no idea how to train puppies. :D

ScarlettDrawl
07-03-2006, 09:44 AM
I have no training advice as I got my little boy, Rico, when he was already trained **wipes brow, phew**. But Bailey is sooooo cute. I love doggies.

Sandi
07-03-2006, 09:45 AM
Thanks you guys!! I am going to buy a ticky clock today and ignore him tonight. Last night he was up ALL night, but I'm afraid I may have caused it by "checking on him" when I couldn't stand it anymore.

He will get to be about 40 lbs. I do hope he will become my new reason to exercise. I am going to get him some good training. I really believe in a well trained dog.

Lyndyn
07-03-2006, 09:50 AM
Good for you, Jacobs Mommy! With your attitude, I know you will succeed. I'm sure that you will end up with a wonderful friend! I have three dogs of my own and wouldn't trade 'em. (Though, I wouldn't mind one of those services that comes to your house and picks up the dog doo for you...)

One of the "tricks" with dogs is consistency...they are such creatures of habit. For instance, if you are going to let them up on the couch, so be it...but, if you decide NOT to let them up on the couch, then NEVER let them up on the couch...

As for exercise...dogs are great at inspiring that! They love it so much that they can make you forget (at least a little bit) that being up at 6:00 in the morning walking around the block is not YOUR idea of a good time!!

He will be a great buddy for ya!

Heather
07-03-2006, 10:34 AM
crate him but keep him in your room. Last year the first couple weeks with our puppy, one of us slept downstairs in the family room and got up with him a couple of times a night. After those 2 weeks, we brought him upstairs with us and left him in his crate. We didn't need to keep getting up in the night, but had to get up bright and early!

Crates are not a bad way to go if used right. Dogs like having an enclosed "den" and they are less likely to poop and pee in their own "bed". They shouldn't be used for punishment, though, and should only be big enough for puppy to turn around and lie down (you can make a larger crate temporarily smaller by putting a box covered by a towel in the back of the crate).

Remember that this is all brand new for poor puppy and he needs to get used to everyone!

He's precious, Btw!

glynne
07-03-2006, 10:45 AM
He is so cute Sandi. It will all work out. They are such good company.

lucky
07-03-2006, 11:10 AM
I have to agree with Lyndyn. Our puppy is a year old now and we have always crated her at night. She loves, loves, loves her crate (we used an old blanket that we didn't mind her having an accident on). I did take her out in the middle of the night to go potty but didn't let her play. It was a potty break and that was all.

Also, don't just crate him at night. She should be in her crate during the day (place it somewhere she can see and hear the activity in your home). Not for long stretches, of course, but anytime he isn't being actively played with (which should be A LOT) or on a potty break. And, when he isn't in his crate during the day keep him on a leash with you. When you are house training you don't want him to sneak off and find a "spot" or he will always go back there. It also helps you control what he chews, etc. Another tip I would suggest is that you not allow him on the furniture AT ALL until he is well trained. Dogs become very territorial and can be aggressive when it feels "threatened". Since I know you have a small child you want to make sure you puppy undestands the pecking order of your family. A puppy should feel it is a definate part of the family but should never be given a reason to think it is anything but the lowest rank.

Now that Daisy is house broken we don't shut her crate at night - but she does still sleep there. She makes her rounds to all the kids rooms, snuggles each one for a while then peeks in our room before going to settle in her "room". The trick is to be consistent. Puppies have very short attention spans so you have to create a routine and stick with it.

buckettgirl
07-03-2006, 11:14 AM
Very cute!

Our dog never accepted kennel training. We tried everything but once we stopped she settled right down. She was older though, when we got her.

If the barking continues we discovered they have collars you can put on them to train them out of barking. One sprays citronella & the other gives them a small shock whenever they bark. The citronella one didn't work at all for us but the shock one worked like a charm. She only barked once & then she stopped. Before long we didn't even use the collar at all & she almost never barks now, except when someone is outside of the house. I was able to rent the citronella one from the vet clinic.

Good luck! & enjoy the cutie!
I highly disagree with using ANYTHING that shocks an animal.... A friend of ours has a shock collar (actually I think her parents brought it over). She put it on the larger of the 2 dogs (a 2yr old chow/shepard mix) and thought it was funny to watch him squirm and then yelp when they shocked him - for no reason. Then someone was holding the collar in their hand and got to feel a shock for themselves... you should have heard the human yelp.
Granted this was abusive, but still.
Dogs bark. Period... Some naturally bark more than others or are more anxious than others, but that is no excuse to shock them.

SuchAPrettyFace
07-03-2006, 12:21 PM
One of the "tricks" with dogs is consistency...they are such creatures of habit. For instance, if you are going to let them up on the couch, so be it...but, if you decide NOT to let them up on the couch, then NEVER let them up on the couch...I agree. You can't let a dog have an old shoe or sock to chew on & then expect them to not chew up new shoes & socks. To them, a sock is a sock, a shoe is a shoe, why is *that* one different? They don't get it.

And if crating at night works for you, then hey more power to you. But I know Sandi works during the day & the thought of a puppy being in a crate for 8+ hours during the day & then 8+ hours at night just makes me think, why even get a dog? But that is just my opinion, and opinions are not wrong, everyone is entitled to their own. :)

Sheila53
07-03-2006, 02:28 PM
I've always crated my dogs and foster dogs, and am a proponent of crating. So many dogs would not be in shelters today if people would learn appropriate crate training.

Here are some articles by a wonderful trainer I know.

http://www.dogmanners.com/articles.html

Have fun with your pup! They grow up fast (which I think is good :) ).

midwife
07-03-2006, 03:17 PM
We have 2 dogs. The first one we adopted when she was 2 from a wonderful couple who had rescued her and she was so well-trained! I fear some of that wonderful training has gone by the wayside...she sleeps on my oldest child's bed, when she never got on furniture before but it makes them both very happy. She's the one who runs with me at 5 in the morning and sometimes her enthusiasm when the alarm goes off is the only thing that gets me up!

Our second dog we adopted when she was a tiny pup and we did not have the first clue what to do. We researched the subject (far more than I have ever researched child-raising!!) and chose to use a crate (one of my patients at the time was a vet and she was very helpful and influential). We kept her on a leash when she was out of the crate and close by. We pottied her every 2 hrs (newborns sleep more than that!) and somewhere along the way, it just worked! She still sleeps in the crate. We have had trials letting her sleep out of the crate, but she finds mischief easily and is content in her crate. When I work, they stay in the back yard, well shaded with lots of water.

Good luck and congrats (and do NOT let this new member of your family interfere with the exercise you have planned!).

Goddess Jessica
07-03-2006, 05:06 PM
Granted this was abusive, but still.
Dogs bark. Period... Some naturally bark more than others or are more anxious than others, but that is no excuse to shock them.

1. Using abuse as an example of common practice is ridiculous. It's like saying taking something away from a child is the same as neglect.

2. I don't use a bark collar and I agree that there are better ways to handle barking before moving to a bark collar. However, to state that there is no reasons to use shock collars as a method of determent is ignorant. Shock collars can be properly used in lots of situations. If the choice is between a shock collar or being put down at a shelter because neighbors call to complain of the barking, I am sure the dog would choose the shock collar. If the choice is between never seeing the sunlight or having a electric fence, I am sure the dog would choose a shock collar.

3. Shock collars can be more humane than many other choices of reprimand. Chock collars, prong collars can cause serious physical harm such as windpipe damage, especially if the dog is a constant puller, or bred for a high pain tolerance. Simply, as with any training device, whether or not it is used for purposes of cruelty is totally dependent upon the intentions and experience of the trainer.

nursiegirl0076
07-03-2006, 08:03 PM
Congratulations on the new pup! Sure is a cutie! We have two canine children. They are kennel/crate trained which is where we keep them when we are working. We do work 12hr night shifts, but they do ok as long as we potty them right before and right when we get home. Other than that, we don't put them in their kennels usually. We have a big fenced in backyard and they run and play and get good and tired out! Ours are quite a bit more spoiled than the other dogs that I've read about are, tho. One downside. But we love them and we're all doing well with this little arrangement! You will find through trial and error what works for you, the dog, and your family....and you will definately find what doesn't! Apparantly there is quite the debate about shock collars...what I've found out is this. It is quite an investment...they are expensive and you have to work to get the dog used to it. But they are good training collars if used properly. Also, if you're looking into the "invisible fence" it works the same way as a shock collar. The dog wears a collar and if it gets within a certain distance a tone goes off. The tone gets more intense the closer the dog gets to the fence. When the dog goes over the line, a shock is administered. My in-laws have it and their dog loves it. She knows where her boundaries are and she can run and do whatever she wants. Our dogs were jealous that they were on leashes! I know you will get lots of advice and even more opinions, but I hope that you and your new addition to your family will become inseparable! And just remember, what has worked for all of us may not work for you so don't get discouraged! Just keep trying different things until something works! And just a side note....I'm really glad I found this website...it's really nice getting to know all of you!

famograham
07-04-2006, 12:19 AM
Oh, Sandi....he's adorable! :)

It will end, I promise...just as long as you are consistent!
Our dogs (Fischer 3.5 and Geo almost 5 months) both love their kennels, it's their safe place, their den. We call it their "room", or just "go to bed" and they happily trot on in.

It takes a little while but before you know it, he'll love it...and I agree just ignore him when he cries, it will only take a few days.

Puppies are hard work, but if you do it right (right for you) it will really pay off in the long run and you'll have a well adjusted family member before you know it!! ;)

Now I have to be a braggin' Momma and post a pic of my two babes, cause well...I just love them! ;)

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g240/famograham/01036.jpg

xoxoxo
:hug:
Linda

SuchAPrettyFace
07-04-2006, 02:37 AM
Look what you started, Linda!! :cool:

Everyone, meet my boy!

ChocLabLover
07-04-2006, 08:41 AM
Sandi,

What a cutie! I remember the puppy days and they are not fun. I crate trained Kiley and it worked wonders. However, I hate to break it to you, but you will be doing some middle of the night runs to the back yard with your pup for a few weeks at least.. A pup can only "hold" it for a few hours at 8 weeks of age. Do you have someone to come in during the day to let the pup out of the crate? Pups will not "mess" in their dens, but if it is too long, they will go in the crate. With Kiley, we had a schedule right down to the minute and we kept to it. It really worked well and established a routine for her. We bonded really well. You will find even after a few weeks you will be able to leave your pup longer.

Linda, thank you, now I can brag about my baby.....

http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d108/ChocLabLover/Kiley3.jpg

She was a lot of work, but now that she is 5, she is such a wonderful dog. I am also a huge advocate of training. Take your pup to puppy class (PetSmart has some pretty affordable ones) once you have gotten all the shots. It is so important to socialize and expose your pup to all different things while they are young. It makes for a well adjusted dog in the future.

Lyndyn
07-04-2006, 09:01 AM
See...now I feel the need to get a digital camera so that I can post pics of my rascals!

If it gets to be after about 11:30, our GiGi (she turned up on our porch at about 6 months old) hassles US to go to bed because she wants to go to her crate. We'll tell her "You can go to bed" and she will dash up the stairs...if we lollygag too long before coming to bed ourselves, though, she will come and try to "fetch" us. It is too funny.

We close the door to the crate at night, but only to keep our grouchy 12 year old Pekingese from "invading" GiGi's space...all three of our dogs are crate hogs!

ETA: Now that I think about it, even the cats have been known to hang out in the crates...seeing that always surprises us...not to mention the dogs!

DishyFishy
07-04-2006, 11:14 AM
What gorgeous doggies you all have! :cool:

Goddess Jessica
07-04-2006, 02:26 PM
These are my two rescue pups.
Emo was the last of her litter at a county animal shelter when I adopted her. I thought I knew SO much about dogs! Emo ate all the ornaments off the christmas tree that year AND chewed through the lights while they were plugged in! Emo is nearly 12 years old now.
http://static.flickr.com/26/181743801_4719b171e7_m.jpg
Keiko is 7. He was going to be put down at a shelter in the afternoon. They had classified him as "unadoptable" because he was an escape artist and no family could keep him for long. The husky rescue called me and asked if I would foster him. Of course I did and (of course) I fell in love. He is the sweetest dog and loves everyone. It's hard to believe someone gave up on this guy.
http://static.flickr.com/48/181743802_b98e629dc5_m.jpg
They have both been through all sorts of training but still belong to the "Ok, I'll do that when I wanna" philosophy. I would love to make Keiko a therapy dog but we'll see.

Carol - Wow, I love the leaves and bandana in that one. How beautiful!
SAPF - What is he buried in! He's so tiny!
Linda- OMG, I love them! They are so cute and hyper.

dragonwoman64
07-04-2006, 04:08 PM
beautiful animals! congrats on that adorable puppy, Sandy. We have a cat (should I admit that here?). She's pretty good at keeping us awake now and again!

SuchAPrettyFace
07-04-2006, 05:48 PM
SAPF - What is he buried in! He's so tiny!That is his kitty blanket. :lol: When I was 11 or 12 it was a Christmas gift. Since we could not have pets in our apartment at the time, things with kitties on made a good present. :) Fast forward to 1995 when we rescued him from a foster home, that was the blanket we had for cuddling on the couch & he took to it like a duck to water. Now that's his blanket. :lol:

He is anywhere from 15-18 pounds. He was over 20 pounds when we got him, looked like a little blanched pecan. His former owners fed him canned dog food & didn't take very good care of him. :( But we've treated him great & here he is now, enjoying his second favorite snack! (he loves tomatoes more)

http://i3.tinypic.com/vxeziu.jpg

buckettgirl
07-04-2006, 08:48 PM
1. Using abuse as an example of common practice is ridiculous. It's like saying taking something away from a child is the same as neglect.

2. I don't use a bark collar and I agree that there are better ways to handle barking before moving to a bark collar. However, to state that there is no reasons to use shock collars as a method of determent is ignorant. Shock collars can be properly used in lots of situations. If the choice is between a shock collar or being put down at a shelter because neighbors call to complain of the barking, I am sure the dog would choose the shock collar. If the choice is between never seeing the sunlight or having a electric fence, I am sure the dog would choose a shock collar.

3. Shock collars can be more humane than many other choices of reprimand. Chock collars, prong collars can cause serious physical harm such as windpipe damage, especially if the dog is a constant puller, or bred for a high pain tolerance. Simply, as with any training device, whether or not it is used for purposes of cruelty is totally dependent upon the intentions and experience of the trainer.

Its not ignorance. I would never shock a dog (or probably anything else either, but I wouldn't have anything besides dogs, cats, birds, and hedgehogs). Dogs bark...it is natural and instinctual - I would NEVER punish them for that. There are ways change behavior with dogs as with humans. The Dog Whisperer is an excellent example of that. I also would never dish out a punishment that I wouldn't be willing to do to another human... Shock collars hurt! Barking (or whatever else) becomes associated with PAIN! Positive reinforcement is a much better choice and can work wonders for animals as with children. It's all about patience. Too many people who own animals either don't care, don't have the patience, or are ignorant in other effective ways...it is very sad.
An it harm none, do as ye will.... animals included.

choices
07-04-2006, 08:53 PM
FaFabulous pup..! I want one!!..I've been thinking of it..but DH put the skids on anything else that isn't human around here...but if it were me, I'd have 5acres,and dogs..lots of them..they just always love you,no matterwhat! Good luck with all that follows..I found a great book in "Puppy Care"..for those beginning months..I also advise,(without my avice being asked,so pardon) that you crate train this pup...After all the dogs I've had, I followed this routine,crate training,and it's a huge benifit..for everybody..you,the dog,etc. take care..and keep in touch,(if your not too busy.)FOCUS!

Sandi
07-06-2006, 09:52 AM
Thanks for all you AMAZING advice everyone. With a towel in place of the newspaper and the addition of a tick-tock clock and no radio, he is doing just great!! Last night I think he only wimpered for 5 or 10 minutes!!! And this morning when I put him back in crate so I could shower, he didn't wimper at all!!!

Now on to house-breaking him. He is doing well, but we watch him like a hawk!! :)

When I took him on his walk this morning (at 5:00 a.m.) he managed to get under my legs and trip me. Thank goodness he is Ok, I could have really hurt him. At 335, when I fall, I fall hard, so my leg is pretty banged up, but I'll live. I was trying to be soooo careful!

Heather
07-06-2006, 12:51 PM
Sandi -- DO watch him like a hawk. Our dogs responded very well to the following if they tried to go in the house:

- a loud yell (to surprise them)
- pick them up and carry them outside
- praise them high and mighty for doing it outside (that should be a given!)

Last year... actually about 1 year ago exactly... I fell down the stairs carrying our puppy -- at 5 am. I managed not to hurt him, or our other dog, but I very badly hurt my coccyx (tailbone!).

I was at my high weight at the time, and that pain was part of what motivated me to lose weight. In hind (haha) sight, I am grateful that it happened, but it hurt so badly at the time...

Goddess Jessica
07-06-2006, 02:06 PM
Positive reinforcement is a much better choice and can work wonders for animals as with children.

I agree that positive reinforcement is excellent in training. However, training's purpose is to establish the pack order - not just training our dogs to respond to commands.

Totally positive reinforcement works against a dog's natural instincts of belonging to a structured pack and trains a dog to respond to a command as if they were tricks. Just because you click your dog for carrying out a certain command and ignore unwanted behavior, does not instil in your dog his natural understanding of the pack structure.

For instance, let's take my lovely dogs for example. If I was doing totally positive reinforcement training, when I give Keiko a command he has a choice: do the command and receive love and adoration from me (or treats or clicks, depending on which training method I am using) or disobey the command and get ignore. In the absence of outside stimulus, he will probably choose to do the command. Ta-da! Great dog. However, I have never exerted my dominance. And well, who cares? In this situation, I've asked him to obey and he did it. Why do I care if I'm dominate or not?

Let's take the same training method and apply it to a stimulus situtation. With Keiko, he has a huge prey drive. In fact, part of the reason he was going to be put down at the shelter was his need to escape and kill little animals (mostly chickens and cats). This is a natural instinct in Keiko but in order for him to live in this world, he has to be controlled. In totally positive reinforcement, he has a choice: stay by my side or go for the cat. If he goes for the cat, I will ignore him but if you were Keiko, wouldn't you risk that for the satisfaction of killing prey? Heck yeah!

In negative reinforcement, I am placed as the dominate pack member. Think of it as the "Because Mom Says So" Effect. Keiko can not be asked to understand that if he kills a cat, the shelter will put him down. Instead, he has learned to understand that because I say so, he must obey or face negative reinforcement.

The term "negative reinforcement" has a bad rap. I do not mean being cruel or base your training on fear. ALL training should include positive reinforcement, and this should be used a lot more than negative reinforcement. However if the dog is to understand the difference between right and wrong in the pack, he should be immediately corrected for the wrong behavior and praised lavishly for acceptable behaviour.

Too many people who own animals either don't care, don't have the patience, or are ignorant in other effective ways...it is very sad.

Ignorance is the worst part. I wouldn't say that owners don't care as much as they just don't understand their dog. Effective training makes shelter dogs into loved pets. It's so unbelievably sad to know that dogs are put down everyday because they did not "obey" commands that they don't understand. Working in a shelter, I saw so many dogs that people dumped because they were simply "uncontrollable." With a little training, they became great dogs.