Food Talk And Fabulous Finds - Is organic superior to regular food?




telemetrynurse
06-02-2006, 05:36 PM
I just read an interesting article about organic foods

http://biz.yahoo.com/brn/060601/18168.html

I'm curious, do you use organic foods? If so, where do you buy them?


LLV
06-02-2006, 05:43 PM
I'm curious, do you use organic foods? If so, where do you buy them?
No, because they're too expensive. I buy the regular food and just wash it.

kykaree
06-02-2006, 05:51 PM
I buy some stuff organic. We get an organic box of veggies sometimes. It's no dearer than buying other veggies, but it's a bit of a suprise. I love organic bananas and get them, I also buy organic dark chocolate.

I like organic meat and chicken too, but rarely invest in that.


ellis
06-02-2006, 06:00 PM
I try to buy them as often as I can afford to. :yes: We belong to an organic food co-op.
I don't agree that they're a "scam". We absorb enough chemical in our bodies, and I think that any little bit helps. Particularly where my kids are concerned. I don't care what the studies say... I'm all for using "natural" products whenever possible. :shrug: It just makes more sense to me.

mandalinn82
06-02-2006, 06:01 PM
I use organic, but only because it ends up being cheaper than regular and provides me with a lot of variety (I get produce boxes weekly from an organic farm nearby). Also, it gets delivered, so it saves me grocery store time.

If they had a cheaper service for non-organic, I might consider using it instead.

Suzanne 3FC
06-02-2006, 06:44 PM
Consumer Reports recently published an article about organic foods and when to choose them. Apparently pesticide doesn't easily wash off of some foods, so they recommend organic in many cases. They recommended http://www.foodnews.org/ for more information. It looks like a pretty interesting site.

cardsfan2009
06-03-2006, 12:21 PM
Right now the only thing organic in my kitchen is granola and strawberries (a local guy grows them and we bought some yesterday. SO much better than store bought!) And once my chickens start laying, all of our eggs will be organic. Plus, we grow tomatoes, jalapenos/habanaro peppers, and corn ourselves.

But otherwise, i really dont bother, because where we shop, its way more expensive, if you can even find something organic.

Alicia:)

jillybean720
06-06-2006, 09:01 PM
I sometimes unintentionally buy organic products. Our Giant grocery store chain now has a line of organic products (their brand name is "Nature's Promise"), and since it's a store brand, it's often cheaper than the other brands. It's not just fresh produce--I've gotten organic frozen fruits, organic chicken broth, organic frozen pizza...keep in mind that just because something is organic does not automatically mean it's healthy ;)

Tampaquillowner
06-12-2006, 12:23 AM
I buy as organic as possible. Organic standards mean that they are grown without using chemical pesticides (which are poison keep in mind) and my personal fave is that they cannot grow the produce using sewage sludge which is a common practice in conventional farming. I for one dont want my produce grown in sewadge sludge, its just gross. They have done studies that show organic produce have more nutrients which makes sense to me.

There was another study done with children to see how the levels of pesticides in the bodies would fluctuate if they were fed organic for a short time. I believe it showed that even being fed organically for a month rid their bodies of most of the chemicals and that when they were reintroduced the chemical levels went back to their high levels.

My children will eat organically as much as possible because I just cannot see how these thousands of different chemical pesticides (which have no other use but to kill) can be good for us. You cant always just wash them off. Conventional farming uses so many different chemicals its insane.

I also buy organic because its good for our environment. They rotate crops, they use natural pesticides,and in general they take care of their land. If you cant depend on massive amounts of poison to kill any insects that come onto your land then you must make sure that you have rich soil and many natural remedies. Its so much better for the earth, and organic farmers make more money. I am all for supporting farmers because if you look at the statistics hundreds of thousands of small family farms go out of business every year due to conventional factory farming methods. Many farmers go into organics as a last resort.

Anyway sorry for the book but thats my 2 cents.

veggielover
06-12-2006, 11:11 AM
pesticides are in ppms. Thats almost neglible. You're right, it does accumulate and add up, but what about other methods of chemicals getting into your body? Instead of just ingestion, what about breathing in and absorbing chemicals through your skin? Shampoo, soap? Sulfer compounds and basement gases are dangerous too. I don't think you can escape toxic chemicals these days, and you know what? I'm not scared. I have to die eventually. Eating organic food won't make you immortal.


But you see, people who eat organic will say that it makes a difference. In a recent study, the NIH showed that eating organic foods DOES NOT PROVE TO BE "HEALTHIER", meaning the health findings related to disease development are insignificant.

I personally buy the cheapest produce possible. If someone wants to spend $5 on organic mac n' cheese I say good for them. When social security dies out in the near future and medicaid drops completely, I'd like to see those saving for retirement or those in retirement buy their organic produce. I'd rather save the money in my piggy bank. The way I see it, even if I ate organic food, I still have the same chances of being killed or dying from some disease developed or contracted. Pesticides are SO overrated.

(on a side note: there's a funny homeless guy who hold ups a cardboard sign on the streets of nyc. He changes the statement on the sign every now and then to something really witty. He once wrote: Bankrupted and now on the streets because I spent all my money on organic food and yoga classes. )

Tampaquillowner
06-12-2006, 11:32 AM
Shampoo, soap?

I use all natural soaps, shampoo, face cleansers. Sure we are all going to die but I dont believe thats an excuse to live marginally. I could weigh 210 again and respond "well I am going to die anyway, might as well keep eating horribly and be obese" but I didnt and I am steadily losing weight for my HEALTH. I feel great, I dont eat meat (thats pumped full of chemicals and antibiotics), try to avoid cheese and dairy (again with the antibiotics/growth hormones), and do the best I can to be healthy.

My thing with studies is this, you can say or "prove" anything with a study. I dont put much stock in them either way. I believe organic produce is better because I believe it tastes better and common sense tells me that the less chemical pesticides touch my food the better. Thats only half of why I buy organic.

Another large part of why I buy organic is because I support small farmers who are doing the right thing for the future of this planet. I dont want to support large factory farming, they are killing the small family farm and I think its horribly sad. My grandfather used to be a dairy farmer and in this day and age he probably wouldnt make it. Not when he would have to compete with factory farms using antibiotics, pesticides, growth hormones, and mashed up animals for feed. The small farms cant compete and they go bankrupt trying. So whenever possible I buy local produce and when I move I am going to be a part of a co op. I do what I can now, and when I own a house I plan to grow my own produce.

ellis
06-12-2006, 12:33 PM
Tampaquillowner, I agree with everything you said. :hat:

jillybean720
06-12-2006, 03:24 PM
I dunno--it's not really fair to say the big farms are crushing all the small ones. I mean, the larger ones are more efficient and can, therefore, off their products at a lower price. I don't buy organic produce because I just can't afford it--the chemically enhanced produce is expensive enough as it is :p But yeah, it's kinda like when people complain that Walmart is driving all the "mom and pop" stores out of business. Well, if those little mom and pop places could find a way to be as efficient and inexpensive as Walmart, then that wouldn't happen. It just doesn't seem fair to blame the big farms/companies just for being, well, big. But, I know, that's a whole different can of worms :dizzy:

People certainly did NOT live longer before farmers started using chemicals, so I don't think it's doing all too much harm to me, personally (now, if you're allergic or sensitive to certain chemicals, that's one thing, but for me being Joe Schmoe on the street, I don't have a problem). Oh, and as a minor aside, produce grown in season in its natural climate (as in, not in an environmentally controlled greenhouse) has more nutrients whether chemicals are used or not, so chemically-enhanced/alterred produce grown in the right place and time of year will be better for you than organic produce grown out of season in a greenhouse, nutritionally speaking. How's that for a factor that may easily be ignored (yet used) to sway studies to provide the data you want? :devil:

Tampaquillowner
06-12-2006, 10:34 PM
could find a way to be as efficient and inexpensive as Walmart, then that wouldn't happen.

Now I am no business major but that doesnt seem possible to me. How can small mom and pop stores compete with something like Walmart? Do you have a business strategy (seriously here im curious) because I am sure all those that are failing would love to know.

I have really started to try and get away from using products from huge companies like Kraft etc. I try to go to smaller owned health food stores more often and only go to Walmart when its a neccesity.
There are many different reasons why small farmers are going under but Factory farming is a big one. If you want to know more the books I have read are "Hopes Edge: the next diet for a small planet by Frances Lappe Moore" and "Mad Cowboy," as well as "Food Revolution: John Robbins."

Anyway what it boils down to is I eat organically because I believe its healthier and better for me. If nobody else agreed with that it wouldnt so much matter to me. I feel healthier when I eat organically, and to me it tastes better.

jillybean720
06-12-2006, 10:53 PM
Now I am no business major but that doesnt seem possible to me. How can small mom and pop stores compete with something like Walmart? Do you have a business strategy (seriously here im curious) because I am sure all those that are failing would love to know.
Well, Walmart started out as just one store, not as an out-of-control widespread corporation. They found an innovative way of doing business and currently have the most ingenius way of handling inventory, supply/demand, and shipping. I just don't think it's fair that just because they were smart enough to learn how to grow, expand, and be insanely profitable, everyone blames them for putting other shops out of business. They very well could have been put out of business themselves in the early days, but they found ways to make their business work and grow rather than be consumed--IMO, they should be applauded, not blamed. I was a business/marketing major, and it just seems to me that everyone is so ready and willing to jump to the little guy's defense without really understanding the nature/origin of the big guy :dizzy: But, just as you said, "if nobody else agreed with that, it wouldn't so much matter to me."

And, like I said, I just don't eat organic because I simply cannot afford it. If I shopped at small stores instead of large chains, I'd be beyond broke :p I admit I feel better when I eat whole foods, but whether they are organic or not does not make a difference to me, personally. Notice how I keep using words like "personally" and "to me"--I'm not ARGUING with you; just pointing out an opposing view :^:

Suzanne 3FC
06-12-2006, 11:54 PM
Walmart has buying power. They will only buy products from manufacturers if they can get the prices waaaaay down, by buying in such high volume. It would be impossible for mom and pop stores to do that, so they can't compete, no matter how efficient they are. But if given a choice, I'll buy from a mom and pop store any day of the week. For me personally, it's not about saving a buck here and there, but feeling good about my purchase, and knowing that my hard earned money is appreciated. I just don't get that vibe at Walmart :lol: We're all different and have different goals when we shop as in everything else in life, lol.

I like to buy specialty foods for those reasons. Like salad dressing - I'll croak before I ever buy Kraft dressing again. I'm bothered by the ingredients, and the fact that they have to compromise food quality to make their products so cheap. Smaller companies that create gourmet brands generally use much better quality ingredients, less artificial ingredients, and are healthier. I'm becoming much pickier as I get older :lol:

I like to buy my produce from farmers markets, which is much cheaper than supermarket produce. Some sell organic, but not all of them. Krogers frequently have good sales on their organic produce.

kaplods
06-12-2006, 11:57 PM
In our area, organic produce is hard to find and extremely expensive (sometimes three times that of non-organic). Going by my understanding of the research, I feel very comfortable buying non-organic produce. If I bought only organic, I would be eating fresh produce much less regularly, and I figure eating lots of non-organic produce, is better than eating only a little organic produce. It's also a matter of choosing battles. If you're looking for pesticides and preservatives, you'll find more in non-organic products, but if you're looking for naturally occuring health hazards (molds, ecoli, salmonella, listeria, and other bacteria...), you'll find more in organic foods. There's statisticaly a greater chance of immediate illness in organic foods, than the chance of eventual illness in inorganic foods. However, since the risks of both are relatively small, I make my choice based on freshness, flavor and price. In the summer, we have many local farmers markets, although some are organic and some are not, the produce is usually cheaper and always fresher and better tasting, so I buy from the farmer's markets whenever I can.

chicagoposter
06-13-2006, 01:29 AM
to answer your question. yes organic products are superior. especially for some foods like peppers. bananas, not so much because you take off the skin.

for me, i picked up a PETA booklet, read about the toxins in animals, etc.. (i don't want to be one of THOSE veggies ;) so i won't go into detail), but ever since then.....i haven't eaten meat.

so, i feel like, if there's a will, there's a way.

never in a million years would someone think that i would stop eating meat, but when i educated myself, i made a decision THAT DAY. so, if you research organic food and want to make the choice to consume it, then i feel like if you have a will, there's a way.

and for those who claim price is the ONLY reason you don't buy it, again, i feel like, if there's a will, there's a way.

in my mind, i think of it as gas prices. if you want to drive your car, you'll find a way to pay for the gas. if you want to eat organic, you'll find a way. and whole foods *cough* whole paycheck, is not the only way to get organic food. my organic food is less expensive than supermarkets (i get 5-6 bags of produce for $25-$30).

so, i do think it's better, and i think it's one more healthy thing that you can do if you make that choice. it may not be the easiest, but if there's a will, there's a way.

:)

jillybean720
06-13-2006, 06:43 AM
To me, cost IS a factor. As it is, I typically spend about $75 a week just to feed my boyfriend and me--it's more expensive because I no longer buy ANY junk food (save the one bag of SunChips I might buy each week for his lunches). Maybe some people have access to places where organic foods are not nearly double the price of the already-expensive non-organic foods, but not me. I'm 23 years old--definitely living paycheck to paycheck. If anyone knows of a place in Alexandria, VA, where I can get non-astronomically expensive organic food, then please let me know--I'm willing to try anything once :p

I'm not saying I don't EVER eat organic food. Like I mentioned in a much earlier post, we have a store brand at the Giant grocery stores here called Nature's Promise--it's all organic, and since it's a store brand, it's not usually very expensive. However, a lot of those foods are more processed, such as snacks and frozen pizzas and whatnot, so it's not products I buy normally anyway. I don't go out of my way to make sure I get the organic choice, and PERSONALLY (there's that word again), I don't think it makes much difference.

I don't think you can make blanket statements such as, "Yes, organic products are superior" (nor should you blanket-state the opposite). I think the answer is: it depends on YOUR individual choices, goals, ideals, mindset, and which media sources you choose to believe. In recent years, I've never heard of anyone getting ill from eating an apple, even if *gasp* they didn't rinse it off first. I'm pretty sure it's not the lean meats and produce that make people today so unhealthy, organic or non-organic aside.

If you chose to eat mostly organic foods, then congratulations. There's nothing wrong with that--it's your choice. I just think there are WAY more important battles to fight before even worrying about that for me (i.e., increasing whole foods, ridding HFCS, saving money when I can, etc.), and I don't appreciate it when people are not open-minded enough to accept others' views.

And on that note, I leave the discussion...I can't get into a discussion involving such a hypocritical organization as PETA without definitely getting kinda heated :devil: Of course PETA will tell you meat is bad--they don't want you to eat animals. It's just like the sugar industry telling everyone how evil Splenda is, or, hmm, the organic food producers telling everyone how evil non-organic food is :o

LLV
06-13-2006, 10:37 AM
Well, it all boils down to choice. I'm not going to say one type of produce is better than the other. Who am I to say that? Am I a farmer? Do I know exactly what chemicals are sprayed onto every vegetable? Do I stand there and watch these "organic" vegetables and can I say for sure no chemicals have been used on them?

Are any of you aware that "organic" vegetables in some areas tested positive for pesticides?

Anyone can say their product is organic. It doesn't mean they're telling the truth.

I buy regular old veggies. I've been buying them for years. So did my mother, I've been eating them since I was a kid. It hasn't killed me yet.

Incidentally, I wasted extra money on a bag of organic baby carrots and they went bad in 3 days.

And let's not freak out and argue with each other over stupid organic vegetables. I fought and made a jerk of myself to keep this topic open (after a mod had already closed it) and if it turned into a true catfight, then I'd feel bad for opening my big mouth.

MTHead
06-13-2006, 10:50 AM
For every study that says organics are healthier, you'll be able to find another that says they are no better. I wash produce with a bit of baking soda regardless of whether it is organic or regular. I buy both kinds of produce, depending on what is on sale and in season.

LLV
06-13-2006, 10:52 AM
For every study that says organics are healthier, you'll be able to find another that says they are no better. I wash produce with a bit of baking soda regardless of whether it is organic or regular. I buy both kinds of produce, depending on what is on sale and in season.
Yes, me too :)

And in summer... farmer's markets! I go crazy at those places.

Suzanne 3FC
06-13-2006, 11:22 AM
Jill, when I was your age and had another mouth to feed, I also had a tight budget, so I can understand your concerns with saving money on food. It can be hard to balance the bills and still put healthy food on the table, especially when the unhealthiest food is often the cheapest. I think just choosing fresh vegetables and healthier foods is what is most important, and going organic is just an extra step that not everyone may want to take. It's a personal choice that's based on many variables.

I'm 44 and only very recently started paying more attention to the types of food I eat and started paying more for organic or all natural products. I never bought into the "organic" food ideology before, but now it is important to me. I started making homemade dog food for Lola, using free range chickens and organic veggies, because she's so old and fragile and I wanted to do the very best for her that I could, because I don't want to lose her. Her old dog food contained things like high fructose corn syrup and a variety of unmentionables. Then I realized that if I was so concerned about what my DOG was eating, maybe I should pay more attention to what I put in my own mouth.

I don't exclude non-organic. But I'll look first for organic and if I don't find what I'm looking for, then I'll move on to the non-organic and load my basket.

nelie
06-13-2006, 11:42 AM
Jill,

When I lived in Colorado, there was a store called Wild Oats (it exists elsewhere but not here as far as I know) where their organic produce was usually around the same price as the regular store. If I buy organic, there is generally a reason as it is about the same price as the regular item or I need an item and the regular item looks bad. If you don't shop at Trader Joe's, you should :) It has a lot of good prices on organic and non-organic items. I have found Giant to be the most expensive grocery store in my area so I try not to shop there. I usually shop Magruder's (do you have those?), Trader Joe's and Costco.

chicagoposter
06-13-2006, 02:37 PM
Jill, when I was your age and had another mouth to feed, I also had a tight budget, so I can understand your concerns with saving money on food. It can be hard to balance the bills and still put healthy food on the table, especially when the unhealthiest food is often the cheapest. I think just choosing fresh vegetables and healthier foods is what is most important, and going organic is just an extra step that not everyone may want to take. It's a personal choice that's based on many variables.

I'm 44 and only very recently started paying more attention to the types of food I eat and started paying more for organic or all natural products. I never bought into the "organic" food ideology before, but now it is important to me. .......

I don't exclude non-organic. But I'll look first for organic and if I don't find what I'm looking for, then I'll move on to the non-organic and load my basket.


well said. i agree. it is an extra step. i never said anything that i CHOOSE is something that everyone else will choose to do, it's something recently i have put a lot of thought into and thought was right for ME. i still stand by my feelings that if there's a will there's a way. it may cause you to make some sacrifices, but i think it's something that can be done.

and Jill- i never said PETA was the be all and end all of organizations. it simply was a catalyst for me to sit down and think about things. not gonna lie.... i picked up the booklet for recipes that's it, it simply got me thinking, i don't think there's any fault in that.

i did very limited and very quick research. if you're interested....

http://www.rawdc.org/dc/fruitDC.html

http://www.greenpeople.org/healthfood.htm

KristasMom
06-13-2006, 05:56 PM
Ok, I try to stay out of these discussions, but I did grow up on an organic farm -- my father was one of those post-WWII nuts who fell in love with Rodale, and got this book called 5 Acres and Independence.

I was like 30 when I realized that the reason my folks gave me a horse was that they wanted the manure!

Here's what I was taught -- on this planet, we are given a finite amount of arable land and clean water. If we farm organically, we return to the earth what we take out of it.

Large factory farms use petrochemical fertilizers and special herbicides and pesticides to get more crops from a given piece of earth than it would naturally give up. This need not be a bad thing - but they are testing organic vs conventionally farmed veges, and they find that organics have higher levels of trace elements and other things that get depleted in conventional farming. How important this is, I don't know.

The other reason I try to eat organic is -- do you know the rates of cancer in farm workers who are exposed to high levels of pesticides -- some farmers actually spray their fields while the workers are in them! Yuck.

That said, I suspect that eating conventionally farmed food is not likely to hurt you much. But I found when I got pregnant with my daughter that I had to eat what was best for her - and I made a lot of organic baby food as well.

So I try to eat organic now - TJs is great for keeping down prices, and we eat less meat, but we eat meat without additives as often as possible. Free range cattle can't give you Mad Cow, and cows that haven't received BST can't give my daughter hormone problems. Yes, the chances are small, but it's worth it to me not to take the risk.

One thing I tried and love, is that you can join a group of people who guarantee a small farmer a fixed income for a season, and in return get a share of the resulting crop. It's a good, not expensive way to get your produce, and we were able to give the okra and kale away...

Sue

mandalinn82
06-13-2006, 06:39 PM
Sue - I do the community supported agriculture thing too - but I made it my personal mission to eat everything (trying to get more variety) - we just had kale this past week. But beets. Man, am I sick of beets.

We get a veggie box every week and a mostly fruit box every other week - the food is SOO good, and you're right, its not that expensive. I save money over my old conventionally farmed produce, and I like the "supporting local business" angle.

Tampaquillowner
06-13-2006, 09:28 PM
And, like I said, I just don't eat organic because I simply cannot afford it. If I shopped at small stores instead of large chains, I'd be beyond broke I admit I feel better when I eat whole foods, but whether they are organic or not does not make a difference to me, personally. Notice how I keep using words like "personally" and "to me"--I'm not ARGUING with you; just pointing out an opposing view

Jilly I agree that sometimes as a college student I cant afford to eat only organic. I cant always. I am not trying to argue it just seems that this thread is all about saying how bad organic food is or how its worthless, etc. Just trying to show that maybe its not completely worthless or stupid. That there might be a reason to pay more for it.Ok, I try to stay out of these discussions, but I did grow up on an organic farm -- my father was one of those post-WWII nuts who fell in love with Rodale, and got this book called 5 Acres and Independence.

I was like 30 when I realized that the reason my folks gave me a horse was that they wanted the manure!

Here's what I was taught -- on this planet, we are given a finite amount of arable land and clean water. If we farm organically, we return to the earth what we take out of it.

Large factory farms use petrochemical fertilizers and special herbicides and pesticides to get more crops from a given piece of earth than it would naturally give up. This need not be a bad thing - but they are testing organic vs conventionally farmed veges, and they find that organics have higher levels of trace elements and other things that get depleted in conventional farming. How important this is, I don't know.

The other reason I try to eat organic is -- do you know the rates of cancer in farm workers who are exposed to high levels of pesticides -- some farmers actually spray their fields while the workers are in them! Yuck.

That said, I suspect that eating conventionally farmed food is not likely to hurt you much. But I found when I got pregnant with my daughter that I had to eat what was best for her - and I made a lot of organic baby food as well.

So I try to eat organic now - TJs is great for keeping down prices, and we eat less meat, but we eat meat without additives as often as possible. Free range cattle can't give you Mad Cow, and cows that haven't received BST can't give my daughter hormone problems. Yes, the chances are small, but it's worth it to me not to take the risk.

One thing I tried and love, is that you can join a group of people who guarantee a small farmer a fixed income for a season, and in return get a share of the resulting crop. It's a good, not expensive way to get your produce, and we were able to give the okra and kale away...




__________________

Thank you!! You said what I was trying to say, only SO much better!
I am going to try and join a Coop when I move in August. The only one we have in Tampa is like 500 a year and I just cant afford it yet. Although if I sat down and did the math I would prbably be surprised. How expensive were your co-ops?

2frustrated
06-14-2006, 08:21 AM
I buy organic chocolate(!) because it tastes better. I buy Organic bananas when I feel like a banana, because they taste all creamy rather than all chemically. However I eat about 3 apples a day and I buy my pesticide-smothered cheap-as-chips apples in bulk, in a polythene bag! I don't even wash them... Heard the one about all the anti-bacterial sprays making people (esp kids) less resistant to bacteria and common allergens? I figure I'm strengthening my immune system by not washing my apples! :lol: Either that or I'm too lazy! :dizzy:

If I can get home-laid eggs then I will, they taste better - the dead mice and cat food that my parents' hens eat make for tastier eggs than shop-bought organic! Did you know that for an egg to be certified organic, the hen only has to have been fed an organic diet for 3 weeks?

If I can, I use those "grow your own" lettuce and herbs and would grow tomatoes on my balcony if I liked them! :lol:

I don't buy ALL organic, because 1) I'd be flat broke and 2) Some things just aren't worth it - eg "Organic" processed foods, like pizza and soup and things, if you truly want something to taste nice, then make it yourself with organic ingredients and you can control the sugar and stuff that goes into it! Also things like organic processed meat things like organic fish sticks :rofl: just make me laugh out loud!

I think organic has become a panacea for Joe Bloggs - "Oh but look mummy, these turkey twizzlers are ORGANIC, they must be healthy!" and "Well this ice cream is organic - better for me than my skinny cows!"

It depends on what angle you take with your healthy eating - whether eating "clean" is important for you, or getting more bang for your buck is important for you. I know my DF buys extra cheap cheese that must've been processed to **** and back, but he is money motivated, so it doesn't bother him at all - he also buys extra cheap cakes and tarts and things, but that's his choice. Whereas if I go and do the shopping, I buy a ton of fresh veggies and some speciality bread and plenty of meat.

Each to their own :)

LLV
06-14-2006, 10:32 AM
I buy organic chocolate(!)
Organic chocolate?

lol

That has to be a joke, right? They really make organic chocolate???

sugarlove
06-14-2006, 02:27 PM
Organic chocolate?

lol

That has to be a joke, right? They really make organic chocolate???

:) Nope, no joke!! I only buy Green & Black's organic chocolate - not only do I prefer the taste, but my son has an immune disorder, and cocoa beans are one of the most highly sprayed crops out there.

I choose organic where it matters most (strawberries, for instance, are heavily sprayed - pineapples aren't as bad), and largely due to my son's health issues. He really needs the highest quality "fuel" I can provide, and for us this means all our meat and poultry is organic (and let me tell you, not worrying about every new report of recalled ground beef is a godsend!), our chocolate is organic, our milk and eggs are organic, and the majority of our fresh produce is organic. We don't buy processed organic foods - they are more about capitalizing on the hype of the "go organic" craze.

It really comes down to personal preference. For us, we do taste a difference in the food we eat, and we've all noticed that we feel a little better, too. NOT that we've discovered some fountain of youth or anything -just little things, like I don't get migraines very often anymore, and some stomach problems have gone away, too. I think that perhaps some people are more sensitive to the chemicals used on foods, the same way others are sensitive to artificial sweeteners. It really is very much like the "sugar vs. aspartame" debate - each side has information to prove their point, each side has its devotees. In the end, it's all about what you choose to believe, and what you decide is fine for you. ;)

mandalinn82
06-14-2006, 02:34 PM
I will say that I've noticed a difference in taste between locally grown (usually organic) produce and supermarket produce, but no difference between supermarket organic and non-organic, except in terms of size. Locally grown produce that gets to your plate faster does taste fresher, sweeter, and better to me, and most produce that you can buy that way IS organic.

sugarlove
06-14-2006, 03:07 PM
Agreed - and I should have mentioned that we do make our purchases "farm direct" rather than at the supermarket. We're lucky in that we have easy access to organic ranches and farms - it really does make a difference when the food is fresh, you know the person who cultivated it, and you have it on your table quickly :)

KristasMom
06-14-2006, 05:06 PM
Our food coop was about 400 per year - but -
You could get a price reduction if you did a certain amount of labor
And I canned and froze some things - I have limits, too. Another side of growing up organic is you learn to preserve and freeze. Personally, I am a great blancher.

Many of the moms in the food coop were also in an organic food purchasing coop. They got really good deals on organics. It made a big difference - over a 50% saving for families where there was a wheat allergy.

Yeah, sometimes it is a little TOO close to the earth - I still remember finding half a cabbage butterfly caterpillar in my steamed broccoli, but that has never killed any aborigines, as my dad pointed out.

Yeah, I'm not sure organic mac and cheese is a good idea. But, if I am going to eat crackers, I can be sure that the small organic brands are less likely to use trans-fat or GMO incredients, both of which I try to restrict.

I love farmers markets - probably the easiest way to do any of this.

My guess is that we do about 50% organic - many fruits and vegies, a lot of the meat and fish, most of our milk. I'm pretty happy with a lot of things - herbs, onions, apples, oranges, etc as they're on the store shelf.

That said, I'm not a nut. We have regular milk sometimes, especially if we have to run out at the last minute. Cheese - I eat what Kroger stocks. I get Bell and Evans chicken and turkey, but if we don't get to the market that carries that brand, I eat Amish country.

I've been paying more attention lately. Part of that old, taking care of myself thing.

Sue

LLV
06-14-2006, 05:27 PM
I don't understand the organic chocolate. I mean, doesn't organic mean foods with no pesticides or chemicals? Why would they put chemicals or pesticides in chocolate?

mauvaisroux
06-14-2006, 05:34 PM
sugarlove - I first got introduced to Black and Green's on a trip to London, England - loooooove the stuff! :love: My favorites one is the dark chocolate with orange and spices.

LLV - the cocoa plants are sprayed to protect them from insects and disease. The organically grown plants are not. Plus a some of the organic cocoa growers and coffee growers are involved in fair trade programs.

I buy organic fruit, vegetables and meat when I can afford to or when it is on sale. We also have an organic farmer's market where I live which is only open on Saturdays in the summer. I find their produce to be a bit cheaper than the grocery store's organics.

I just find that local and/or organic produce tastes better, probably because it doesn't sit in a warehouse or on a truck somewhere for weeks before it gets to you. Also conventional produce is sprayed with preservatives or other agents to make them last longer. That is why some produce ends up looking and feeling waxy like peppers, apples and cucumbers.

I don't buy organic frozen meals or prepared canned/boxed foods as they are pricey and in my opinion, still processed :p I have bought canned organic tomatoes and jarred salsa and they were delicious!

I would love to buy the organic milk but it is almost $8.00 for 3 litres :faint: as opposed to $3.49 for 3 litres of regular milk.

I like to buy my produce from local growers to support small farms in my area. There is a woman at our local flea market that makes homemade jams, salsa, pickles, pickled beets, chutneys ect. at reasonable prices. Most of her ingredients come from her own garden and they are delicious! :T We also buy honey and maple syrup from local farms.

I'm growing herbs and tomatoes in my garden using organic soil (which I got on sale for 99cents for a huge bag) and organic pest control products.
I read in a gardening book that planting basil and chives in with tomato plants keeps the insects away so I tried that out and it seems to be working.

For me it is about feeling good about what I am eating, supporting farmers and small business in my area and being mindful of the ecological effects on the earth.

I guess I'm a gothic hippe :rofl:

telemetrynurse
06-14-2006, 05:36 PM
I don't understand the organic chocolate. I mean, doesn't organic mean foods with no pesticides or chemicals? Why would they put chemicals or pesticides in chocolate?


I was also curious so I did a web searh and found this about organic chocolate:

What makes Dagoba organic? Is it also shade grown?
All of our products are certified organic. Certified Organic cacao farmers donít use any chemical pesticides or fertilizers, the beans arenít fumigated with methyl bromide (a carcinogen and ozone-depleter) and beans are not mixed with non-organic ones. Our cacao is grown in the natural rainforest, preserving biodiverse, fragile habitats.

We also operate a dedicated organic facility and go beyond cacao to use certified organic sugar, essential oils, fruits, and nuts as available. All ingredients are GMO-free and non-irradiated. Our product ingredient pages note the organic status of our ingredients.

How does Organic differ from ďall natural"?
"All natural" is a term that has no legal meaning and can be used freely. It does not mean that the cocoa is organic, or free of chemical pesticides of their residues. Chose organic.

LLV
06-14-2006, 08:19 PM
Thanks, girls, for the explanations. I was totally confused about that!