100 lb. Club - I have a disease...




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Sandi
05-25-2006, 01:33 PM
It's called Obesity. But I am lucky, there is a cure. The perscription is 1800 calories, taken daily. Exercise will help the calories do their work and water helps too.

This is my new way of thinking. If I went to the doctor and he said I had something wrong, I would do whatever he told me so we could fix it. I get leg cramps due to dehydration (& weight I imagine) but if I stay VERY hydrated, I don't get the cramps. 2 or 3 days off water and I will get charlie horses all night and they will stay cramped throughout the day. So what do I do? I stay hydrated!! Well, of course I do, duh. Who wouldn't do something so simple. Water isn't my drink of choice, I much prefer diet pop. But I drink tons of water and slip the pop in here and there when I feel like I can "afford" it.

Who also wouldn't do something so simple as limit their consumption of calories to 1800 calories a day, every day, no matter what to combat Obesity. I realize that it may not be that simple, but I am also thinking that maybe it just is that simple.


famograham
05-25-2006, 01:40 PM
Sandi, that is wonderful.

And who says it can't be that simple? We all have our own reasons for doing this. It's like Sarah was saying the other day..we wouldn't let our kids or pets gorge themselves into oblivion...so we remove that choice and do not allow it. Sarah has done that now for herself as well. It's simple...but it works.

I love your idea...and you're absolutely right. We wouldn't avoid our insulin if we had diabetes, or even our mastectomy if we had breast cancer...so why can't we make it that simple and follow out treatment for obesity? We can....and you can do this!!!!!

:cheer:
:hug:
Linda

dragonwoman64
05-25-2006, 04:47 PM
when I started trying to exercise, I remember I completely hated it. I would skip days all the time. Then I've feel bad, because I wanted to lose weight, and get in better shape. Rob exercises every day, and he encouraged me. It really did take me a long time to get into a routine, and the more I managed to do, the easier it got -- especially after I had a number of days under my belt where I stuck to my exercise plan. It was so easy to psych myself out not to do it. The only way I finally did get myself into gear was to NOT think about it, just do it.

I know eating and losing weight can have all kinds of different implications for each person. Sometimes for me making myself not think about it and just follow a plan DOES help. It's a bizarre thing.


andoreth
05-25-2006, 05:05 PM
Yeah, I think that 90% of the battle is finding that "click" in your mind, that force that will get you though the calls of old habbits and temptations. For some of us, it might be a vision of what we want to become, for some a vision of what we want to stop being. It could be looking at our situation in a new light or a specific goal that can only be reached through a lighter and healthier body.

I suppose it's related to the concept of "doing it for yourself"...doing what for yourself? What is the true goal, what is the true reason? I wonder if it is really enough to have "losing weight" as the goal. When I was 250 lbs, it wasn't a good enough reason to change my lifestyle. Would it be a good enough reason when I return to 250? Would it be a good enough reason when I reach maintenance weight?

And fear..well fear is fleeting. That which scares us becomes familiar so quickly. I used to be afraid of 300lbs, but now I'm afraid of 400. Wouldn't I have just become afraid of 500 if I had gotten to that point? If I ever reach 190, how in the world could I expect myself to fear 200, which I now long for so greatly? Even those "little" physical symptoms that scream to us that we need to change NOW become so easy to ignore if they don't kill us right away.

I think that diagnosing yourself with a condition, and then treating that condition as a life-long affliction can be a great way to find your "click". It gives you a clear image of exactly what your issue with the weight is, and a strong reason to follow through with the months and years of actions that will be needed to resolve that issue (and keep it resolved). 90% of the work done!:)

tchrnow
05-25-2006, 10:31 PM
Sandi,
You gave me an "ah-ha." I have been trying and analyzing why I could go for 9 months during my last pregnancy without junk food or sweets (well I know the sweet answer, they made me vomit) BUT the point is how could I do it for so long and then now NOT! The reason is tied to your post: I did it because it was to "treat" my medical condition, ie pregnacy. I knew I had one chance to grow my baby and I wanted to do everything in my power to see that she would be healthy and carried to term.

That's my "click." It isn't a tramatic occurance or an embarrasing moment or a life scare. It's simplier than that. It's matter of fact. It's the concrete concept that has been alluding me.... I have a disease and the treatment is 1800 kcals daily with regular exercise.

THANK YOU!
Lynne

SherryA
05-26-2006, 12:24 AM
Sandi,

Try taking some potassium for your leg cramps. Dehydration, if it means that you are peeing out a lot of the water you take in, can also wash potassium out of your system. That loss of potassium can mean terrible Charlie Horses at night.

Of course, potassium works best with magnesium and calcium, so you could take all three.

I don't agree that obesity is a "disease". Maybe a "health condition" that needs treatment.

I'm all for anything that helps you get that "click". For me even that isn't doing it though. I liked what Andoreth said the other day about sitting and evaluating what it is that you really WANT. I still haven't decided. I think that is why I'm struggling as much as I am. For years I "kind of" wanted to be back to 130, thin like I used to be with that cute figure I used to have.

But that "kind of" was really an ambivalent feeling because that cute figure didn't come without its share of problems. Being heavier is in some ways EASIER. Now that I'm older, that 130 doesn't appeal to me near as much as it did. I don't think I would even look good that small any more. I wish I could believe that I would, but I think it is too late for that. I'm 50 after all. I was only in my 20s when I was that small.

I might like being as small as I was in my mid 30s though when I was going to the gym 3 times a week, but I was unmarried then and had more time and more motivation for losing. I wanted to get married again, and without feeling confidence in myself, guy shopping just wasn't in the cards.

That deciding what you want, REALLY want. Who you want to be, what you want to look like and what steps you are wililng to take to get there, and deciding that you want it BADLY enough to do the work involved. That is what I need to work on. At this point all I know is what I DON'T want to be (fatter than I am), and so I'm working at this from the wrong direction I guess. Because obviously you are never going to be "fatter than you are". I mean even if I gain 5 pounds or a 100 I won't be "fatter than I am" at that point!

Deciding what you want, how you will deal with it and then staying by your resolve. That is SO hard for me right now. It wasn't hard at the beginning of the year, but I'm thinner now than I was then (by about 20 or so pounds) and it doesn't seem so imperative that I continue taking the weight off.

Finding motivation again after doing well for awhile and slipping off the "wagon" is so hard sometimes.

Rtael
05-26-2006, 04:40 AM
It's called Obesity. But I am lucky, there is a cure. The perscription is 1800 calories, taken daily.


Is that prescription in addition to what you're already eating? Because if so, I think we may have found your problem! :devil:

Jen
05-26-2006, 10:34 AM
Sherry, I highly recommend that you don't give medical advice unless you are a physician. Potassium can kill you if there is too much in your body. Most electrolytes fall into a narrow range of appropriate levels in the body. Too much or too little can be very harmful. Taking a multivitamin is probably okay for most people but to take specific supplements such as potassium, that should be prescribed by a physician after reviewing bloodwork results. Some people cannot even eat bananas because that raises their potassium to above normal levels.

Sandi, I've often said that losing weight isn't rocket science. Theoretically it is a matter of calories burned being greater than calorie intake. We know this and know like you have said that if we intake a healthy number of calories then we can lose weight probably quite easily. It is just a matter of getting our emotions on board with what our brains are telling us. I know a woman who had weight loss surgery and has lost 22 lbs this past month because she can only eat 600-800 calories a day. Well if we ate that much we'd lose 22 lbs a month as well! She knew that as well but she couldn't do it without surgery. All the surgery does is provide a good reason not to overeat, if she tried it (especially so soon after her surgery) she'd be vomitting it up in 2 seconds. If we can somehow emotionally do what she had to do with surgery, that is give ourselves a good reason not to overeat, we'd be able to lose weight just as quickly. Long term though even surgery won't keep the weight off. I've seen too many people though who don't follow whatever regimen they need to follow to keep their health on track regardless of what disease they may have. There are a lot of people who won't take their medications or follow their diabetic diets and they are just as sane and intelligent as we are. Would you say that is stupid? I would but then I am just as stupid when I eat stuff I know I shouldn't and don't exercise and I know that ultimately it will cost me. I will die before my time and likely my last years will be uncomfortable or painful. I have seen this first hand in the hospital so I know what I am talking about. It is hard to find that motivation to keep on losing weight and I hope that whatever 'click' has happened will help keep you motivated to lose weight.

famograham
05-26-2006, 12:28 PM
I've seen too many people though who don't follow whatever regimen they need to follow to keep their health on track regardless of what disease they may have. There are a lot of people who won't take their medications or follow their diabetic diets and they are just as sane and intelligent as we are. Would you say that is stupid? I would but then I am just as stupid when I eat stuff I know I shouldn't and don't exercise and I know that ultimately it will cost me. I will die before my time and likely my last years will be uncomfortable or painful. I have seen this first hand in the hospital so I know what I am talking about.

Jen, I never said that people who don't follow their medical regimen...or that we, who sometimes can't/don't follow our plan are stupid! Nor did I say people who don't are less than sane, or unintelligent!

So let me clarify, I guess: MOST of us wouldn't avoid our insulin if we had diabetes, or even our mastectomy if we had breast cancer.

I believe that Sandi has a very good working point here.... after doing the emotional work, treat the medical condition, and keep it as simple as that.

I'm sorry if what I said bothers you.

:hug:
Linda

SherryA
05-26-2006, 01:03 PM
Potassium can kill you if you take too much. Absolutely I agree with that. Potassium supplements in the stores are like "3 percent" of the RDA however, and most vitamins give you a great deal more than "3 percent" of whatever you are supplementing.

For this reason I believe that the "safety" part of potassium supplementation is built into the mineral supplements themselves. But absolutely no, you shouldn't take too much. However Charlie horses while sleeping can be a sign of not enough potassium in the body. When I have had them and have supplemented potassium, they have gone away. A good "multivitamin" if it contains potassium (and some do, some don't) will probably be enough as well. But that same "multivitamin" probably also contains no more than "3 percent" potassium.

dragonwoman64
05-26-2006, 02:55 PM
Deciding what you want, how you will deal with it and then staying by your resolve. That is SO hard for me right now. It wasn't hard at the beginning of the year, but I'm thinner now than I was then (by about 20 or so pounds) and it doesn't seem so imperative that I continue taking the weight off.

Finding motivation again after doing well for awhile and slipping off the "wagon" is so hard sometimes.

I hear you on that one! I have envisioned lots of things I want to do, and some of the positives of being thinner (clothes, health, activity level, self esteem, etc.). On the other side of that coin, I wonder what I get out of being heavy. I can't help thinking there is something powerful I get out of it or I wouldn't be holding on to the weight for so long. It's comfortable, it's familiar, it protects me...maybe stuff like that.

The truth is I don't find it that hard to do the exercise, but I LET myself wander off the eating plan. Usually my thinking is something along the lines of "well, I worked really hard with the exercise, I deserve a treat!" or "I've spent several days pretty well on program, I deserve a treat." I know in my heart that losing the weight would be the biggest treat of all, but it just a matter of consistently convincing my brain of that!

sometimes just having a plan, and following it each day and not thinking about it keeps me going. plus, having a journal that I put my results down in every week (and how much exercise). I have to say, seeing over time what I'm doing and how I'm doing makes a big difference. I HAVE to face the good and the bad. I sound like I'm contradicting myself, but somehow in my brain it makes sense. :p

Shelley1969
05-26-2006, 04:16 PM
To Jacobsmommy
I used to suffer from leg cramps or charlie horses that would bring me to the floor at night. My doctor suggested or told me to drink at least 100 oz of water a day. He said leg cramps are the result of not enough water in the tissue or joints. I tried it and it actually worked. As for the potassium issue , I think i would talk to him about that one. For me , I have high blood pressure so too much potassium would be dangerous,esp if you take medication.

Shelley

SherryA
05-26-2006, 09:56 PM
I once read that minerals are something that will not taste good if you don't need them. There are salt substitutes that you can buy which have potassium in them. If you use them on your food and they taste nasty, then you don't have that particular mineral deficiency. If they taste good to you, then your body needs it however.

I also heard once years ago, that gasoline smells good to those with an iron deficiency, but not to other people. I mentioned this casually at the time to a friend of mine and she said she had never heard that, but that in her family her sister was the only one who had iron deficiency problems and that she was also the only one in the family that gasoline smelled good to.

Possibly true, possibly not. If taking supplements bothers you, eat a few potassium rich foods and see if that helps the cramps or see if they taste good or nasty to you. Too much potassium IS dangerous. I agree with that. But too little can cause health problems too. On Atkins people tend to lose potassium (particularly in the beginning of the diet) and he advocated taking some potassium. But he also included warnings with that advice. Charlie horses and leg cramps at night were signs of potassium deficiency according to him. He was a cardiologist. I'm not sure if people on other types of diets lose as much water weight and potassium as those on low carb diets do, so it may not be true for you. Sure ask your doctor about it if it worries you.

SherryA
05-26-2006, 10:12 PM
On the other side of that coin, I wonder what I get out of being heavy. I can't help thinking there is something powerful I get out of it or I wouldn't be holding on to the weight for so long. It's comfortable, it's familiar, it protects me...maybe stuff like that.



I hear you. What DO we get out of being fat? Maybe something as simple as identity. It has become a part of who we are. The language we use regarding our attempts to get healthier are in themselves "negative" too when you think about it. "losing weight". Who wants to be a "loser?" When in most of our regular life is "losing" considered a good thing?

Someone sees you and they say "You've lost weight". Does that sound like a compliment? Say they saw you and said "I hear you lost your big game yesterday..." is that a compliment? No it is pointing out your "failure". Losing weight isn't a failure of course, but a success. It just doesn't sound that way.

I was listening to some motivational tapes one time by a speaker named Brian Tracy. He had done a lot of research into various ways of looking at life, and one of the things he said that I thought was interesting is that the subconscious mind can't process a "negative". That if you want to accomplish anything you can program your subconscious mind by using "affirmations" But these affirmations can't be worded in negative words. For instance you can't say "I don't smoke any more". Mind doesn't get it. You can say "I am smoke free" or "I am a non smoker".

I think one way of helping ourselves to "lose" weight is to drop the word lose. Think instead about what we are gaining. "I am gaining a better body" or "I am gaining a healthier, stronger body". "I only eat good nutritious healthy delicious food."

I think for me? I don't want to "lose" a part of who I am. That sounds very extreme and drastic, even knowing that it is a part of me that is only excess and unneeded stored fuel. My fat is a part of me. Maybe I don't LIKE being fat, but when I'm thinking about how I must "lose" it, it is demotivating. Gaining more health, gaining more ability to move pain free, gaining strength? Those things sound really good.

A lot of times it is just a matter of how we think about it. To me "losing" weight equates to "losing" the ability to eat all the things I love. That is an unbalanced and stupid thought process that we should be able to overcome. Maybe just a mind set change would make the difference.

A thought just occurred to me. Since language is so powerful and since the language we use here is "losing", it makes me wonder what other cultures call it in their language. I was reading a book about how "French women don't get fat". One of the things she described was a lady enjoying her particular little favorite sweet and calling it (in French) "my tiny adorable sin".

Her point was that only in French would a sin be called both "adorable" and "tiny". I wonder how they refer to removing a few pounds. It could be that the language makes a lot of the difference.

Jen
05-27-2006, 06:36 AM
Jen, I never said that people who don't follow their medical regimen...or that we, who sometimes can't/don't follow our plan are stupid! Nor did I say people who don't are less than sane, or unintelligent!

So let me clarify, I guess: MOST of us wouldn't avoid our insulin if we had diabetes, or even our mastectomy if we had breast cancer.

I believe that Sandi has a very good working point here.... after doing the emotional work, treat the medical condition, and keep it as simple as that.

I'm sorry if what I said bothers you.

:hug:
Linda


Actually Linda I don't think I was even going by your post when I wrote that part. I was thinking of myself and family and people I have had as patients in the hospital. IMHO opinion people can be very stupid when it comes to their health. We can be very wise when it comes to offering advice but it is so much easier to say than to do. I think I am stupid fairly often when it comes to watching my weight. I'm not going to candy coat it and say that it isn't dumb to eat stuff I know I shouldn't. I can't blame everything on some kind of emotional problem. I must be a real basket case if everything I eat is the result of something emotional prompting it. No, sometimes I am downright stupid, I know what I should be doing and I don't do it. I am not beating myself up, I am being honest. Maybe if I could be this honest with myself all the time I would follow my plan and be losing weight. Too often I give myself excuses to eat what I eat and to not exercise and all I am doing is wallowing in denial.

Stevi-rocks
05-27-2006, 07:42 AM
Jen, I read it the way you intended...Just for clarity.

MsHelena
05-27-2006, 10:52 AM
I can't think of obesity as a disease, at least for myself. If I did, I'd allow myself to sit back and pack on the pounds. After all, it's an illness. No use punishing myself/fighting the inevitable.

I suffered with depression for a good part of my life, and I completely gave in when I was final told that it was a disease. I was waiting for someone else to give me the cure. I stopped taking any personal responsibility. I felt like I had a right to be unhappy. I didn't get better until I started thinking of it as a matter of choice. "Helena, choose to be happy." I still struggle sometimes, but control is back in my hands.

While I'm sure it's beneficial for many of you to think of obesity as a disease, it is critical for me to think of it as a matter of choice. For reasons that I've spent a lot of time thinking about, I allowed myself to become obese. There were many points along the way where I could have turned things around. I didn't. A few weeks ago, I made a stand. I know that if I spend one more day packing on the pounds that I made that choice. This works for me.

Just to clarify, I am not saying that obesity is not an illness. It might well be. It probably is. It's simply not the way I choose to think about it.

dragonwoman64
05-27-2006, 01:16 PM
I hear you. What DO we get out of being fat? Maybe something as simple as identity. SherryA

I REALLY agree with that for myself. I think part of me says I've been fat all my life, it's part of who I am. It makes it harder for me to imagine a thinner, healthier me.

I think for me? I don't want to "lose" a part of who I am. That sounds very extreme and drastic, even knowing that it is a part of me that is only excess and unneeded stored fuel. My fat is a part of me. Maybe I don't LIKE being fat, but when I'm thinking about how I must "lose" it, it is demotivating. Gaining more health, gaining more ability to move pain free, gaining strength? Those things sound really good.

A lot of times it is just a matter of how we think about it. To me "losing" weight equates to "losing" the ability to eat all the things I love. That is an unbalanced and stupid thought process that we should be able to overcome. Maybe just a mind set change would make the difference. SherryA

yep yep and yep. I know logically that I don't have to give up all the things I love to eat, that I can and have learned to replace more harmful food choices with better food choices. That I can survive and be happy with LESS food. To keep lose the weight consistently, I have to accept those things and work on them even more. It really is a mindset, imho.


I'm not going to candy coat it and say that it isn't dumb to eat stuff I know I shouldn't. I can't blame everything on some kind of emotional problem. Jen

I don't think it's stupid or dumb to try and figure out why we keep certain habits when we want to change them. They can be emotional, psychological, just a continuation of an easy pattern, or all of the above, or something different. By figuring out the cause it can be easier to figure out a solution.

It can be different at different times for me. If the goodie is there and I want to eat it, no emotional stuff going on, then the solution is to not have that goodie around. If I'm upset, and I go to the corner and get chocolate, then I have to figure out a different way to handle being upset.

Also, I do think when I continue a pattern of behavior that I KNOW is bad for me, keep eating those taquitos at night when my goal is to LOSE WEIGHT, I'm letting myself zone out and giving in to the treat (that momentary it will be good and I want it). I think for me part of that is maintaining my consciousness of the goal and feeling like I'm worth it and can do it.

I don't know if anyone else deals with this, but I have a tough time getting some of those goodies out of the house because I feel like I'm letting go of the comfort of having it around. The kid in me wants to have my cake and eat it too (and lose weight after I eat it). Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way!!

kykaree
05-27-2006, 06:48 PM
When I first started to think about seriously getting the weight off, I approached obesity the same way I approach a behavioural difficulty with a client at work. I didn't see my obesity as an illness as such, but a condition - and one that I had contributed to.

I analysed the behaviours that made me fat. And basically it boiled down to this.
1. I am obese because I am frightened of myself - being fat is my identity, my protection - if I lose the fat, what do I become? How do I protect myself?

2. I am obese because food effectively medicates my emotions that I am running away from. When I am lonely, depressed, happy, frightened - I turn to food. If I remove that behaviour, what goes in its place?

3. I am obese because I have learnt that movement frightens me. If I run, I wheeze, if I swim, I might have an asthma attack and no one will see me. I am uncoordinated and might hurt myself (I have mild cerebral palsy). What can I do to combat this and to do what I need to do?

I came up with strategies for each of those things. That's why exercise is such a huge part of what I do now. I got as much help as I could. I posted here and on the exercise forum, I found as many trainers as I could and asked lots of questions. And I tried one new thing every week. Now I do so much exercise and I love it.

For me, the answer to the emotional stuff has been, to some extent, weight training. I feel safer fatter, but soon worked out that muscle will make me feel just as strong, it's metabolically active, and it looks nice :)

For me, I have had to make myself accountable. I spent years blaming others for my obesity - the man who abused me as a kid, the teachers who told me not to exercise or I would have an asthma attack, my parents, the kids who bullied me.

I am responsible for my obesity. I am responsible for my weight loss. No one can do this for me.

Obesity can be classified as a disease, but that does not obviate our responsibilty to cure that disease ourselves.

Jen
05-28-2006, 02:34 AM
I don't want anyone to think that I am saying that anyone else is stupid. I can't or wouldn't put a label on anyone else. I say MY behaviours are stupid.

SuchAPrettyFace
05-28-2006, 03:52 AM
I didn't take offense to your post. In fact, I do believe the medical community refers to this as a "non-compliant patient". Am I close?

People with kidney disease cannot have the extra potassium. I get leg cramps all the time. I just deal with them. Sandi are you on birth control pills? I know the warning labels on mine say that leg cramps are a normal side effect, but if they get bad, to seek medical treatment.

I remember the first time I read my medical chart & saw the words "morbidly obese". (2004 or so) What an eye opener. I'm not sure if it should be categorized as a disease. I know I need to move more & not 'treat' myself so often. I really do think dieting is as simple as calories in versus calories expended. I've done it before. I can do it again. :)

SherryA
05-28-2006, 04:21 AM
Kykaree, my daughter has had asthma and I hate it. It used to scare me so badly to watch her suffer from attacks. It really is a limiting thing. I made up my mind to find a "cure" for her if I could. I looked into a thing called Buteyko (which if you do a search you can find online). She doesn't have attacks any more. She doesn't use medication either. Extreme exercise (such as running) does still cause some problems, but most other things she can do. I honestly think this method helped her. You can PM me if you'd like to know more. I'm not selling anything, what we did was free.

Regarding the rest of your post, I can understand and agree with your method of analyzing it. I honestly think I'm obese for about 3 reasons.

The first is that I've been addicted to chocolate my whole life. Giving up chocolate would be the very best thing I could do for myself, but I probably never will because I seriously love it. (There that's honest, if not very productive). I did give it up for a large part of the first of this year and it did help.

The second reason is that I stopped being as active as I was as a child and teenager. When I grew up I told myself I didn't have as much time to "play" as I used to (and the reality is that a lot of that is true).

The third reason is that sometimes I just don't eat early enough or often enough, or eat on the run, or eat too fast, which all translates to slowing my metabolism, and making myself too hungry later in the day so I wind up eating too much, or the wrong foods (usually chocolate).

I think in the back of my mind I know that if I stopped with the chocolate and even if the only other change I made was to become more active, the weight would probably come off. But the idea of a life without chocolate? Ugh. That's hard to face. The activity I can do. The chocolate I think I could do for awhile, but how does someone give up something they love so much forever?

YP1
05-28-2006, 05:02 AM
I've used the disease/illness analogy in my head before, but in a slightly different way. I don't believe that obesity is a disease as such, and I blame no-one and nothing other than me for the weight I let myself get to. But if I'm ever unmotivated or complaining about having to work out or eat sensibly, I remind myself that if I was (for example) blind I wouldn't necessary like not being able to see, but I wouldn't have a choice about it. There wouldn't necessarily be any treatment or any lifestyle changes that I could make that would give me back what I'd lost. I'd have to live that way every day, whether I liked it or not.

I know that with obesity I have choices, and that the state that my body is in is entirely under my control. I can choose to be obese by not working out, or I can choose to be a normal weight by sticking to a healthy lifestyle.

SuchAPrettyFace
05-28-2006, 03:23 PM
Great post, Helen!! I agree 100% it's all about choices. :yes:

The chocolate I think I could do for awhile, but how does someone give up something they love so much forever?I think you don't have to give it up forever, I think it's more about how to enjoy your favorites in moderation. If they are too troublesome, well then yes, it's maybe time to live without them until you feel you can have them in moderation. You've already proved to yourself that you can do it, so to do it again would not be a huge deal.

And yes, you may have lost the weight quicker w/o the chocolate, but would it have been as enjoyable? You still have to live your life.

kykaree
05-28-2006, 05:42 PM
Ditto SAPF (nice to see you posting ;) ) I have eaten chocolate throughout this journey. I have changed how I approach it, and changed the sort of chocolate that I eat. I eat low sugar chocolate, with at least 70% cocoa solids, and in small amounts.

Because I saw this as a lifestyle overhaul, I knew I couldn't do anything like "ban" my favourites. I'm sure I could have lost weight much quicker without some of my "compromises", but this is a lifelong commitment I'm making, not a "weightloss diet".