Weight Loss Support - New study shows weight gain depends on how many calories we eat, and not when we eat




Glory87
02-15-2006, 03:22 PM
http://www.webmd.com/content/Article/118/112924.htm

I found this link to be very interesting. I know so many people are intent on not eating after a certain time of day since there is a belief that you are more likely to gain weight if you eat at night. That didn't match my experience, where I routinely got home from work late and had big dinners at 9-9:30 and then went to bed. Didn't seem to affect my weight loss at all. Nice to see the science backs it up!

"If it were true that nighttime eating made you fat, everyone in Spain would be obese -- because they don't eat dinner until 10 p.m."

Oprah - keep chewing that orange zest after 6:00 pm, baby.


AquaChick
02-15-2006, 03:24 PM
Hey!

Thank you for the information!!!! Tres cool. :cool:

I always was one of those, "do not eat after a certain time" people, but you have my attention.

Angel33
02-15-2006, 03:26 PM
This is great news. I have had so many people tell me that I would loss weight if I stopped eating after 6pm. I'm lucky if I get dinner by 8pm.
Thanks for sharing the article

Leec


kykaree
02-15-2006, 04:01 PM
I lost most of my weight whilst working 12 noon to 8pm shifts, with a one and a half hour commute home, so dinner at 10pm most nights.

I never quite believed the "thou shalt not eat after x o'clock" I held with the calories in calories out theory, and it's nice to know I was on the right scientific track.

LadyFirelyght
02-15-2006, 04:02 PM
I never really believed that eating after a certain time made me gain weight. HOWEVER, I've found in my own life that if I don't eat after 8, I eat less. And I eat better food. After 8, I tend to grab "munchies" such as chips, crackers, and candy. I'm less alert, so I don't realize what I'm doing until it's too late.

blues4miles
02-15-2006, 04:04 PM
Thanks for the article Glory, I agree fully. I understand the "mental" implications of not eating late, but for me it's always been easier to space out lighter snacks during the day and eat a bigger dinner (I'm sure these are all psychological limitations) and if I'm eating like I'm supposed to it's worked so far :)

Kim R
02-15-2006, 04:14 PM
While I don't completely discount this study, I think a more valid (and less invasive) one could have been done using human subjects. Makes me wonder why they didn't. :?:

I've never thought that the time of day that a calorie is consumed matters. I do believe that the number of hours spent eating and the number of hours awake does. For example, when my husband stays up late several hours after I go to bed he eats more than I do. (I know because of the leftover dirty dishes and the missing food. :p ) I get up earlier then him but spend that time preparing breakfast and packing lunches, etc. However, I tend to eat more in the morning than him, because I've been awake longer burning calories.

srmb60
02-15-2006, 04:17 PM
"New study shows weight gain depends on how many calories we eat" :tape:

MrsJim
02-15-2006, 04:34 PM
I never really believed that eating after a certain time made me gain weight. HOWEVER, I've found in my own life that if I don't eat after 8, I eat less. And I eat better food. After 8, I tend to grab "munchies" such as chips, crackers, and candy. I'm less alert, so I don't realize what I'm doing until it's too late.

Trust me...you're not the only one - For me, that's the main point of setting a rule of not eating after such and such a time - because it's so easy to get into a habit of snacking mindlessly in front of the teevee or getting up during a suggestive commercial (if you KWIM!) to see what the Snack Fairy has left in the fridge during the past 15 minutes...

http://www.nabiscoworld.com/images/promos/snackfairy/promo_home_fairy.gif

Since I have 'weird hours' after work (classes at the gym, riding lessons, etc) it's usually impossible for me to have dinner before, say, 6:30 or 7:00 (or even later...there's a great boot camp class at the gym from 7-8 pm tonight that I was thinking about going to which means dinner for me will be at around 8:15-8:30). But I have a rule - after dinner, the kitchen is CLOSED. And I always find it's best to have a PLANNED dinner - if I don't have anything planned then it tends to turn into a snackfest which is NOT a good thing...

just my two cents...

LLV
02-15-2006, 04:41 PM
http://www.webmd.com/content/Article/118/112924.htm

I found this link to be very interesting. I know so many people are intent on not eating after a certain time of day since there is a belief that you are more likely to gain weight if you eat at night. That didn't match my experience, where I routinely got home from work late and had big dinners at 9-9:30 and then went to bed. Didn't seem to affect my weight loss at all. Nice to see the science backs it up!

"If it were true that nighttime eating made you fat, everyone in Spain would be obese -- because they don't eat dinner until 10 p.m."

Oprah - keep chewing that orange zest after 6:00 pm, baby.
I never paid attention to what time I eat. A friend of mine says, "I don't eat anything after 7pm, even if I'm hungry." And I would always say, "Why?"

As long as you keep it within your calorie range, it makes NO difference what time of the day you eat. Your body processes food the same at 12 midnight as it does at 12 noon. I've lost 80 pounds eating late at night - every night.

Denying yourself food just because it's a certain time of the day is just plain crazy. And unnecessary!

LLV
02-15-2006, 04:44 PM
"New study shows weight gain depends on how many calories we eat" :tape:
lol! I thought the same thing. I was like, this is their new study? Well duh! Ask the many of us that have already figured that out.

Excess calories make you fat. Not what time of day you eat.

2frustrated
02-16-2006, 08:47 AM
I third Susan B's comment! I need a bang head against wall smilie! :rofl:

cinnamonspice
02-16-2006, 09:27 AM
I understand this to a point, but for me if I eat later in the evening I don't tend to eat the right type of foods. After I eat supper that's it for me. Hungry or not. I usually eat around 5:30 or 6:00 and go to bed around 10 or 11. If I were to eat I'm sure it would not be the healthiest of choices. It just helps me to say "ok, I'm not eating anything after 6".

morrigan
02-16-2006, 11:18 AM
I'm with Oprah - not because I think evening calories have a different impact, but because by 6 or 7 pm I have used up all my calories for the day. Eating late in the evening puts me over my daily limit and compromises my weight loss.

srmb60
02-16-2006, 12:27 PM
Planning is everything. I have always been an evening snacker. It's something that I've had to deal with. I leave calories for later. Nobody should go to bed hungry.

Less of Lena
02-16-2006, 12:35 PM
The only reason I try to limit time-of-day eating is so that my food has time to digest before my body heads off into deep sleep. I always thought that during deep sleep, everything, including your rate of digestion, calories expended, etc., slows down.

I don't think it's a good idea to eat a full dinner and then lay right down to sleep (think Thanksgiving dinner). Therefore, I try to stop eating an hour or two before I go to sleep. Or, rather, after eating anything substantial (anything heavier than just a quick snack), I try to stay up long enough for the digestion to get into full swing.

Since I'm a night owl by nature, night time eating is a given for me. Holy cow, if I had to stop eating at 6pm I'd be ravanous... ravenous... raevenous... um HUNGRY by bedtime!!!

Kery
02-16-2006, 12:43 PM
I'll agree with Less of Lena-IMHO, it's more a matter of not going to bed *right after having eaten*. Eating at 8 and going to bed at 10 is perfectly acceptable, in my book.

I've never abided by the "don't eat later than 6pm" rule anyway (and it didn't prevent me from losing weight), mostly because if I eat too early, I end up grazing by 9 pm (I'm not an early sleeper, and eating at 6 would mean sleeping at 8 to avoid snacking? Yuck...*shoot herself at the only thought*).

wundawoman
02-17-2006, 12:50 PM
The belief was that if you ate late at night, the calories would "stick" to you. But eating 1200 cals. a day is eating 1200 cals. a day and if you burn up more than you take in, you're gonna lose weight! Same goes for the type of calories. 1200 calories of celery is not much different from 1200 calories of mayonnaise, except celery provides more fiber and the fat in mayonnaise takes less energy to store as fat in the body (guess you skip a step).

What cracks me up are the people who believe that certaining combinations of foods are "taboo." If you are told you can't combine "fat" and "carbs" in the same meal, yes, you'll lose weight. It's not because of science or strange metabolism boosting effect. It's because if you are forbidden to combine them, then you can't eat cake, french fries, cookies, etc. So you've just found a different way to cut out junk. (Although I will admit that it's better to eat a bit of protein with fruit because it'll slow down the sugar rush from fruit. Eating fruit by itself makes me very hungry.)

LLV
02-17-2006, 05:23 PM
Planning is everything. I have always been an evening snacker. It's something that I've had to deal with. I leave calories for later. Nobody should go to bed hungry.
That's what I do. I've always been a late-night snacker and when I began my lifestyle change, I tried cutting that out and found that I just couldn't do it. Because on the nights I forced myself to stay away from my usual (and very addictive) habit, I'd lay there wide awake - hungry - wanting something to eat - and I'd end up in the kitchen stuffing my face with things I shouldn't have had. So I made a 'pact' with myself that from then on I was going to save calorie room for whatever I wanted to eat at night and I PLAN what I'm going to eat so I don't mindlessly go bonkers with stuff I don't need.

My calories aren't used up by the end of the evening because I don't allow them to be. I make sure I save those calories for whatever I want to eat at night and if that means being a little hungry during the day, it's no big deal to me. I'm used to it. I'd rather have a few hunger pangs than give up my late-night munchies.

It's a trade-off. Small sacrifices, if you will. You just have to be willing to make them :)

maegdaeien
02-17-2006, 05:36 PM
Yeah, I've always had the idea that time of day really doesn't matter. I mean, why does it matter when you eat, because it's all going to the same place? But I figure it's not so much for the people who get up later and stay up later (thus, eat later) than for the people who eat breakfast/lunch/dinner at a normal time and then feel compelled to eat a 4th meal late just because there's room in their bellies.

Kery
02-18-2006, 04:20 AM
What cracks me up are the people who believe that certaining combinations of foods are "taboo." If you are told you can't combine "fat" and "carbs" in the same meal, yes, you'll lose weight. It's not because of science or strange metabolism boosting effect. It's because if you are forbidden to combine them, then you can't eat cake, french fries, cookies, etc. So you've just found a different way to cut out junk. (Although I will admit that it's better to eat a bit of protein with fruit because it'll slow down the sugar rush from fruit. Eating fruit by itself makes me very hungry.)
Haha, that's a nice way of explaining it.

I had started by following such a "plan" (it also involved glycemin index). I've kind of dropped that now. I could do without the cakes etc, but being "forbidden" to eat an egg with a slice of bread in the morning because it's a "wrong" combination did, uhm, suck in the long run. I still go on with the glycemic thing, since it seems healthier to me (who needs processed foods anyway), but the forbidden combinations... meh.

Tealeaf
02-18-2006, 01:49 PM
I've always thought that concepts such as "don't eat after x time" or rigid food combinations were just ways to complicate the the "eat less" part of weight loss, and make people feel more in control. Eating less, moving more is simple and effective, but it's far from easy.