100 lb. Club - Dry brushing to prevent skin sag




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LivingWater
01-11-2006, 10:55 PM
IT works! I had to loose a significant amount of weight once before and while loosing the weight, I dry brushed. Once at night-once in the morning. I lost all of the weight and had no skin sag. I'm not kidding you.

Anyway, just thought I'd share. :)


Glory87
01-11-2006, 11:16 PM
Of course, you could be just one of the lucky people who are genetically blessed not to suffer sagging skin after weight loss.

LilMsCntBeWrng
01-11-2006, 11:29 PM
What exactly is dry brushing?


SuchAPrettyFace
01-12-2006, 12:24 AM
Do a search on "loose+skin". I think it's a sticky thread in the Maintainer's Forum. It explains dry brushing, lotions, etc.

LivingWater
01-12-2006, 02:27 AM
Dry brushing is like brushing your hair but with a "dry brush" and it's your skin. You can get a dry brush at most retailers. Natural brushes are best because they're gentler on your skin. You just rub your skin (your whole body) in circluar motions towards your heart ~ twice a day. Start with your feet and work your way up. You'll know to stop brushing an area when it gets a little rosey. Anyway, it feels good and makes your skin so soft. :D Velvety almost.

I don't know about genetics... I have stretch marks everywhere from pregnancies. Big, deep, ugly ones. My mom has sagging skin. She's never dry brushed but gone up and down in weight her whole life.

funniegrrl
01-12-2006, 11:57 AM
Dry brushing used to be touted as a cure for cellulite -- now it's being promoted as a cure for loose skin? :P

Dry brushing will NOT prevent loose skin. It may exfoliate and stimulate circulation, which will improve your skin's appearance, but it does nothing to make the skin shrink more than it would anyway.

charliekay
01-12-2006, 12:00 PM
while reading this it just sounded like exfoliating to me,i do the very same thing before i lay in the tanning bed,it just sloths off dead skin cells.

activeadventurer
01-12-2006, 01:56 PM
I was hoping I could get some more details about what kind of brush you used and how long you took to do it each 2xs/day. I know that what you are talking about is something that they do in Indian medicine (as in India). My doctor recommended it for detoxification. It sounds great for circulation and stimulation. Thanks for sharing this.

synger
01-12-2006, 02:10 PM
I was curious, so I Googled it. Here are a couple of links that explain.

http://altmedicine.about.com/od/homeremedyhowtos/a/dry_brushing.htm

http://www.womenfitness.net/beauty/skin/skin_brushing_for_detox.htm

activeadventurer
01-12-2006, 02:19 PM
Thanks Synger:D

LilMsCntBeWrng
01-12-2006, 10:18 PM
Thanks for all the Info, the soft skin alone will get me to do this...

LivingWater
01-13-2006, 12:36 AM
It's worth a try. I only know what I experieced and have read about. :)

I bought a long handled, natural bristles (no plastic or synthetic fibers) brush from W-mart, I think, but I've noticed they don't carry the natural ones anymore. Any health food store would carry them :)

I usually dry brushed 15 mins. each morning and night.

Lionlade42
01-13-2006, 02:13 AM
:dizzy: What is dry brushing?

Lionlade42
01-13-2006, 02:15 AM
lol, can you tell I'm new...nevermind

famograham
01-13-2006, 03:13 AM
:lol: Lionlade!

So you found it then?

:welcome2: To the board..you'll love it here

:hug:
Linda

funniegrrl
01-13-2006, 03:17 PM
My question is, how do you know you wouldn't have gotten the same result WITHOUT the brushing? I'm not trying to be combative, but a lot of the lore that gets passed around like this is just that -- lore with no proof or even sound scientific theory. I would just ask that some critical thinking be applied to claims like this before people run out and buy brushes and spend a lot of time and energy. Show me a published, peer-reviewed scientific study that shows that this has some benefit, and I'll be the first in line for a brush. But both my common sense AND what I've read from REPUTABLE sources say it's a bogus idea.

Heva2015
01-13-2006, 03:30 PM
But whatever it does or does not do, it DOES exfoliate your skin and makes is softer and lovely, just don't put too much belief in the idea that it will stop saggy skin or cellulite or whatever....

lessofsarahtolove
01-13-2006, 03:56 PM
Soft, velvety skin sounds lovely indeed! Twice a day, though? Jeez, I don't have time to put on lotion twice a day, much less BRUSH myself twice a day! :lol: Oh, well, maybe my skin would still benefit from at least some occasional brushing. ;) I dare say I'm with funniegrrl 100% on this one, though: I sure as heck wouldn't expect this to prevent any weight loss-related skin sag -- that just completely flies in the face of logic or established science, in my opinion.

I'm glad your skin looks great though, LivesinWater!

Heva2015
01-13-2006, 04:01 PM
Oh yeah, there is no logical way that a bit of brushing stops saggy elephant skin in the belly area!!!! I brush in the shower...just a little bit of a brush now and then!

ledom
01-13-2006, 04:07 PM
Well you know, I went out and bought a brush last night and went through the routine. No matter what the benefits or how often you get around to it - it feels great! And this morning, my skin is so soft after only trying it one time. Might not be the cure we'd like it to be, but it sure isn't going to hurt anything. My brush has a long handle, boar bristles and quite a bargain at .99 at Wal Mart.

funniegrrl
01-13-2006, 05:38 PM
Sure, it's not going to hurt anything, and exfoliation and stimulation is a good thing. It's just like giving yourself a little self-massage with some exfoliation to boot.

But, ya know, I've been using "loofah gloves" instead of wash cloths for years and years in the shower, so I exfoliate my face and whole body every day. Yes, it feels nice and it helps make my skin smooth all over. You can get cheap ones at Target or just about any store that sells spa-y type things. Here's some really nice ones you can get from H20+: http://www.h2oplus.com/retail2002/productdetails.aspx?ProductID=200-03072-000. I love their "Bath Aquatics" shower gel, too.

ledom
01-13-2006, 06:12 PM
I have really been getting into my baths lately. Soaking in hot water feels so good. I have been a shower girl forever. I guess there is a lot I don't know about pampering myself. Exfoliating is a nice addition to the routine. Did it again today.

LivingWater
01-14-2006, 03:34 PM
Well, I'll say it again, I only know what has worked for me and what I have read. I realize there are many skeptics out there, ****I**** happen to be the biggest one. I will be dry brushing again during this weightloss (have to find my brush from one of our many boxes). I have alot of weight to loose and I'm going to try what I can. Better than doing nothing at all. :D

DeterminedLady
08-04-2006, 02:18 PM
My question is, how do you know you wouldn't have gotten the same result WITHOUT the brushing? I'm not trying to be combative, but a lot of the lore that gets passed around like this is just that -- lore with no proof or even sound scientific theory. I would just ask that some critical thinking be applied to claims like this before people run out and buy brushes and spend a lot of time and energy. Show me a published, peer-reviewed scientific study that shows that this has some benefit, and I'll be the first in line for a brush. But both my common sense AND what I've read from REPUTABLE sources say it's a bogus idea.


Hi!

Brand spankin new here. I was doing some more research on dry skin brushing and came across this thread in my search results.

I don't know about preventing sagging skin, but dry skin brushing has a whole host of health benefits....not the lease of which is it's beneficial effect on the lymph system. The cosmetics benefits (glowing, soft skin) are just icing on the cake.

I feel a little compelled to add that science is not all it's cracked up to be. In fact, science is is often behind the 8 ball. It still catching up with what people have known for hundreds, sometimes thousands of years. Also, how many times have we come across things that science (and the FDA) assured us was perfectly safe, and.....well....you know how THAT goes.

I'm not dismissing science...I think it is a beneficial gift from God that allows us to learn more about the material world in which we live. However, I don't need a double-blind scientific study to tell me the benefits of drinking green tea, dry skin brushing, yoga-type exercise, and a whole host of other things that science is just now "discovering"....because I've experienced them. Anecdotal evidence should not be dismissed out of hand.

"Lore" often gives way to the "scientific advancements" and cures of today and tomorrow. The two can go often hand-in-hand!

Besides, a dry skin brush is all of about $7.00. It's not a major investment in time or money.

Snowbrocade
08-04-2006, 02:47 PM
"I feel a little compelled to add that science is not all it's cracked up to be. In fact, science is is often behind the 8 ball. It still catching up with what people have known for hundreds, sometimes thousands of years."

I totally agree Determined--there are lots of folk remedies out there that are now being rediscovered by science like it is a new thing!

Exfoliating should have some effect on the skin in terms of helping stretch marks etc. I dont know about its effect on the deeper layers of skins that cause the big sag. What I have read is that with slower weight loss there is less sag--so obviously it can be prevented? Probably brushing or loofahs should increase circulation which could possibly help healing and restoration of the skin layer. Exercise is probably a big part of that too.

I imagine there is not much different in the effect of dry brushing versus using a loofah in the shower.

There are firming lotions that are supposed to help restore the elasticity of the skin--any thoughts or studies on that?

Tygerlilie
02-19-2010, 03:21 PM
Dear Snowbrocade,

This is in response to your question about firming lotions. I know this post is a few years late, but I just came across this forum while searching for information on dry brushing.

I worked for a clinical research site that conducts research trials on cosmetics and personal care products. My Principle Investigator (the doctor on site) did her own personal experiment using Nivea Firming Body Lotion. We never conducted a study on the efficacy of the product, but she wanted to know for herself if it worked. As you might imagine, we use highly intricate instruments to conduct these studies. She used a 3D Imaging System that took before and after photos of the treated area. Not only did she see results visually, but she used the photos to acquire quantitative data by using the associated software to lay the photos on top of one another and measure the distance between the two images where the cellulite was present.

I guess this is my long way of saying the stuff really works!

And just so you know, I do not work for Nivea. I just thought I would share this information with you :)

happymama4
02-19-2010, 04:00 PM
Isn't dry brushing the same as exfoliating?

Exfoliating is great for the skin, and I've done it all my life, but after having 4 kids, including 3 kids in one year (my second child was born, and then my twins were born 10 months later) . My skin is torched. Oh well. I embrace. But I do try to take the best care of it that I can. :)

Sunrose
02-19-2010, 04:15 PM
"What I have read is that with slower weight loss there is less sag--so obviously it can be prevented?"

But the could the reason there is less sag with slower weight loss be because the skin has time to firm up during the loss, instead of waiting until after? Could that be why people who have tummy tucks and other surgeries to remove loose skin have to wait a six months (I think)? So, if the same person loses weight slowly or quickly, will their skin will end up being the same in the end?

Michelle98272
02-19-2010, 04:48 PM
What if you are already sagging? Hello BatWings and Mother's Apron!