Exercise! - Barefoot on treadmill




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HeaterAC
08-05-2005, 04:04 PM
Anyone do this? Is it really a big deal. It's my at home treadmill...


Star
08-05-2005, 04:13 PM
Not a good idea, bad for your feet becuz they need support....

Ruthxxx
08-05-2005, 04:16 PM
Definitely not a good idea.


Solus
08-05-2005, 04:27 PM
Bad for your feet? It's bad for your KNEES! You should definitely need the impact absorption of shoes.

lizzbabe
08-05-2005, 07:13 PM
Ditto to the above. Can I also mention that there is a girl at my gym that lifts weights in FLIP-FLOPS? I hope she never drops a dumbbell!

AmberM
08-05-2005, 07:47 PM
I tried it one day because I was too lazy to come upstairs to get my shoes (yes I was too lazy to come up the stairs even though I was exercising *smile*) and I tore my feet up. I got blisters where I stepped and had to lay off the treadmill for a couple of days. I do still do my exercise videos without shoes though, even though they say you should have shoes on.

Good luck!
Amber

Ilene
08-05-2005, 07:53 PM
I've read several articles of the benefits of running barefoot, I personally wouldn't do it myself, but there seems to be some benefits ... Here is just one (http://www.runwashington.com/features/barefootrunning.html)of several articles that I found...
The Truth About Barefoot Running
By Tim Sprinkle
May/June 2004
For the Washington Running Report

In this age of hyper-engineered performance gear and space-age wicking fabrics, it's a little strange to hear athletes talking about "getting back to the basics." But, despite the technology that's come onto the scene in the last few decades, there's a subset of runners--you might even call them a subculture--hailing the virtues of the ultimate in throwback uniforms: bare feet.

It's not as "out there" as you might think. After all, Ethiopian runner Abebe Bikila won the 1960 Olympic marathon after cruising sans shoes through the streets of Rome (although he did lace up for his 1964 repeat performance). But is barefoot running really a viable option in this day and age? I mean, have you seen some of the things lying on the side of the road out there?

"We are not born with an innate need to protect our feet from nature," says Ken Saxton, running guru and owner of runningbarefoot.org, a clearinghouse of information for "au natural" foot enthusiasts. "Running barefoot is what we were designed for. Our ancestors . . . survived because they had healthy feet. They ran well because their feet helped them learn how to run the way they were designed to run."

And Saxton should know, he's been running barefoot for nearly eight years, completing dozens of road races and marathons in that time without lacing up as much as a shoe. Saxton, the current torchbearer for the bare foot movement, believes that shoes are actually preventing runners from learning how to run. "Sure it is painful to run badly in bare feet," he says, "but that is why barefoot runners learn not to run badly."

"I think it is an amazing example of the power of the advertising dollar that more people aren't running barefoot," he says. "One of the most common arguments people give for not running barefoot [is] 'if my feet hurt this much with shoes, imagine how badly they would hurt without!' We cannot see [that] the pain in our feet is because of, not despite, our shoes."

Even Saxton will admit that he sometimes gets funny looks from other runners, but the benefits, he says, far outweigh the stares. Since shedding his shoes, his running technique has improved (now smoother and less pounding), he's developed better foot strength, his circulation during workouts has improved, and he's gotten faster. The lack of "running shoe fungus" is an added bonus, he says.

But Washington, DC, podiatrist Stephen Pribut, DPM, himself an athlete who dishes out running injury prevention advice at drpribut.com, isn't convinced.

"My goal is to do whatever it takes for [my patients] to run without pain," he says. "If they have a perfect foot and barefoot running has been working for them, then OK, but for the vast majority of runners out there, I wouldn't recommend it. I just haven't seen any solid studies that show barefoot as a more effective way of running."

The problem for Dr. Pribut is that, while a handful of people have perfectly shaped feet (in regards to their bone and muscle structure) that would allow them to run comfortably without shoes, the vast majority of us don't even come close. Our extra-long toes, wide foot beds, and stubby heels are well served by our running shoes, which are designed to compensate for just those sorts of shortcomings.

"Shoes make up for the perfect feet that most of us don't have," Pribut says, adding that foot structure is just one of the problems facing barefoot runners. "I'd just wish them luck and hope that I don't have to be the one to take the shards of glass and beer can tops out of their feet afterwards," he laughs. "Even race horses wear shoes for protection."

Would he encourage someone who'd been running comfortably in bare feet to change his or her approach?

"It's a tough call. If they'd be doing it for a long time and were used to it, I wouldn't try to change their style. It's one of those things that may (at least according to the anecdotal evidence) be good for some, but is not ideal for most."

In any case, both Saxton and Pribut recommend that runners considering the barefoot scene start slow (even just walking at first) and build up gradually. Remember that your feet have likely been protected from the elements for several decades, so it will take time for them to toughen up. And when it doubt, speak to your physician before trying anything radical (such as running through Washington, DC, without shoes). The Truth About Barefoot Running
By Tim Sprinkle
May/June 2004
For the Washington Running Report

In this age of hyper-engineered performance gear and space-age wicking fabrics, it's a little strange to hear athletes talking about "getting back to the basics." But, despite the technology that's come onto the scene in the last few decades, there's a subset of runners--you might even call them a subculture--hailing the virtues of the ultimate in throwback uniforms: bare feet.

It's not as "out there" as you might think. After all, Ethiopian runner Abebe Bikila won the 1960 Olympic marathon after cruising sans shoes through the streets of Rome (although he did lace up for his 1964 repeat performance). But is barefoot running really a viable option in this day and age? I mean, have you seen some of the things lying on the side of the road out there?

"We are not born with an innate need to protect our feet from nature," says Ken Saxton, running guru and owner of runningbarefoot.org, a clearinghouse of information for "au natural" foot enthusiasts. "Running barefoot is what we were designed for. Our ancestors . . . survived because they had healthy feet. They ran well because their feet helped them learn how to run the way they were designed to run."

And Saxton should know, he's been running barefoot for nearly eight years, completing dozens of road races and marathons in that time without lacing up as much as a shoe. Saxton, the current torchbearer for the bare foot movement, believes that shoes are actually preventing runners from learning how to run. "Sure it is painful to run badly in bare feet," he says, "but that is why barefoot runners learn not to run badly."

"I think it is an amazing example of the power of the advertising dollar that more people aren't running barefoot," he says. "One of the most common arguments people give for not running barefoot [is] 'if my feet hurt this much with shoes, imagine how badly they would hurt without!' We cannot see [that] the pain in our feet is because of, not despite, our shoes."

Even Saxton will admit that he sometimes gets funny looks from other runners, but the benefits, he says, far outweigh the stares. Since shedding his shoes, his running technique has improved (now smoother and less pounding), he's developed better foot strength, his circulation during workouts has improved, and he's gotten faster. The lack of "running shoe fungus" is an added bonus, he says.

But Washington, DC, podiatrist Stephen Pribut, DPM, himself an athlete who dishes out running injury prevention advice at drpribut.com, isn't convinced.

"My goal is to do whatever it takes for [my patients] to run without pain," he says. "If they have a perfect foot and barefoot running has been working for them, then OK, but for the vast majority of runners out there, I wouldn't recommend it. I just haven't seen any solid studies that show barefoot as a more effective way of running."

The problem for Dr. Pribut is that, while a handful of people have perfectly shaped feet (in regards to their bone and muscle structure) that would allow them to run comfortably without shoes, the vast majority of us don't even come close. Our extra-long toes, wide foot beds, and stubby heels are well served by our running shoes, which are designed to compensate for just those sorts of shortcomings.

"Shoes make up for the perfect feet that most of us don't have," Pribut says, adding that foot structure is just one of the problems facing barefoot runners. "I'd just wish them luck and hope that I don't have to be the one to take the shards of glass and beer can tops out of their feet afterwards," he laughs. "Even race horses wear shoes for protection."

Would he encourage someone who'd been running comfortably in bare feet to change his or her approach?

"It's a tough call. If they'd be doing it for a long time and were used to it, I wouldn't try to change their style. It's one of those things that may (at least according to the anecdotal evidence) be good for some, but is not ideal for most."

In any case, both Saxton and Pribut recommend that runners considering the barefoot scene start slow (even just walking at first) and build up gradually. Remember that your feet have likely been protected from the elements for several decades, so it will take time for them to toughen up. And when it doubt, speak to your physician before trying anything radical (such as running through Washington, DC, without shoes).

aphil
08-09-2005, 11:04 AM
Running barefoot outdoors is one thing...but it needs to be worked up to slowly. I was checking out the "Free" shoes and the guy who runs at the sporting goods store said they pretty much have a manual on how to break into wearing them. He runs about 60 miles per week already, and doesn't want to take the time to break them in. (Since you are using different muscles and a slightly different stride, you can't just hop in them or go barefoot and run the length that you would in standard running shoes.)
On a treadmill though, I would definitely wear shoes...just because you are on a MACHINE. :lol: Call me paranoid. :lol:
Also with step aerobics, walking videos like Walk Away The Pounds, regular aerobics videos, strength training, and other things of this nature shoes are important. It is also important to wear the right type of shoe for what you are doing. Don't wear walking shoes if you are running, and so forth because your stride and impact are different.

The only videos and exercises where shoeless in general is needed are things like yoga, Pilates, Hula dance videos, Belly dance videos, and the like. The two dance styles I mentioned have a different "posture" that you use, so you really cannot do these dance forms in athletic shoes without throwing that off. If you must wear footwear for these dance forms, soft ballet slippers-(not pointe obviously) preferably split sole, or lyric sandals used for modern dance are recommended.

Please though...don't do videos such as Walk Away The Pounds (too many kicks and such in them) or strength training without shoes.