Exercise! - Beginner with weights....




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Gitterdone
06-21-2005, 01:22 PM
After all the great things I have heard about weight training, I have decided to add them to my program. I don't have a clue whereas to start. I like to excercize in the privacy of my home, and I only have 2lb-ers, for walking. I know I can get other weights at Walmart, but which size should I start with? Is their a certain program or book that I should follow? I would like to target my arms, back and abs. I already do cardio 6 times a week, so I just need some strength training advice!!!! It would be nice to work out in front of the TV too, instead of a video, but I will settle for anything. Another request??? ANYTHING WITH THE FASTEST RESULTS!!!! (Although I've heard arms are the hardest body part to see change in toning.)


funniegrrl
06-21-2005, 01:39 PM
This is a repeat of a post I did a week or two ago to someone who had the same questions:

The types of weights you need to start with will totally depend on your current abilities. When I started I had a pair of 3 lb dumbells, a pair of 5 lbs, and a pair of 8 lbs. You may need lighter or heavier weights, but that's a typical set up for a woman just starting out.

I can point you to a bunch of different resources that I've found helpful, and others here will have other recommendations.

I really like Kathy Smith's video series called Lift Weights to Lose Weight. I think the original version would be a great place to start -- it contains a 20-minute upper body and a 20-minute lower body workout. You could do both on the same day, and do it 2 or 3 times per week (resting a day in between). Or, you could do upper body one day, lower body the next, for either 4 or 6 days per week. This is in addition to the cardio you might do. The routines are well-designed and she gives good instruction on form. When you've worked with this tape for a while you could move up to the innovative volume 2. (You can also start out with volume 2, it's just a little more challenging). She also has a book with the same title that gives great explanations about why weight lifting is important and general information, along with specific exercises.

There is also a great online reference at www.stumptuous.com/weights.html if you are more of a do-it-yourselfer. TONS of great info and inspiration there.

paperclippy
06-21-2005, 01:47 PM
I'd also suggest the book Fitness for Dummies. It has a good discussion of the benefits of weight training, all the basic exercises, and tips on how to get the most out of your strengthening workout.


Ilene
06-22-2005, 12:19 AM
I love www.stumptuous.com/weights.html that funnygirl suggested :yes:...

WaterRat
06-22-2005, 02:11 PM
There's also a Weight Training for Dummies that I like. I have the Kathy Smith book too and between them and the stumptuous site I've gotten lots of good information. I bought 3, 5 and 8 lb weights, but I've gone beyond the 3# for everything, and the 5# for most things, and even the 8# for a couple. Nowadays I do all my lifting at the gym where they have any weight I want, and some I'll never get to! :lol:

aphil
06-23-2005, 10:37 AM
There's also a Weight Training for Dummies that I like.

This video is called "Getting In Shape With Weights For Dummies" and is available at Collage Video, or Amazon.com. You may be able to find it on Ebay as well. It is very good for beginners.

If you want to start doing a beginner total body routine like this one with your 2 pound weights, you can, but judge how fatigued you are after each set of exercises. If you aren't struggling to get the last repetition of an exercise out, then you need to go up a size in weights. This is the key, you have to judge your fitness level as you progress, and go up when it becomes easier. Slowly move up from your 2's to 3's, your 3's to 5's, and your 5's to 8's as you progress. Soon you will be doing 10's and 12's with some exercises. You have to evaluate your strength as you progress personally.

To save money, some stores and sporting goods stores offer sets-that may have 3-8 pound weights, or 5-10 pound weights in them as a starter set.