South Beach Diet - Hate to Cook




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Gypsydancer
02-08-2005, 03:00 PM
Hi! I'm considering following Phase II (I'm still breastfeeding my one year old), but read somewhere that it's not a good diet for those who hate to cook. Well, I DESPISE cooking. I can cook eggs and that's about it. My question is, is it possible for the cooking-phobic to follow this plan? If so, any suggestions for easy, convenient meals?


a broad abroad
02-08-2005, 04:01 PM
Hi! I'm considering following Phase II (I'm still breastfeeding my one year old), but read somewhere that it's not a good diet for those who hate to cook.
- True.

Well, I DESPISE cooking. I can cook eggs and that's about it.
- What do you plan on feeding your child after the breastmilk and pureed food stages are finished? If you depend on packaged meals/convenience foods later on for the kid then you will possibly be setting him/her up for health and weight issues when they are older, not to mention how un-nutritious all that stuff is.

My question is, is it possible for the cooking-phobic to follow this plan? If so, any suggestions for easy, convenient meals?
- Perhaps someone else may be able to offer another option.

wendyjo
02-08-2005, 04:04 PM
While I hate to discourage anyone from doing this diet, I agree that if you hate to cook it's not the diet for you. As I told my sister, who also hates to cook, you'd be better off doing Jenny Craig or any other plan that has prepared meals that you can purchase.

And yeah, what ARE you gonna feed you baby once it's no longer breast feeding?


Gypsydancer
02-08-2005, 04:21 PM
I guess I should clarify so y'all don't think I'm raising a malnourished yet obese kid. My son is already past the pureed food stage and eats a primarily organic whole food diet: egg yolks, oatmeal, yogurt, hummus, whole grain toast with tahini, fruits, cottage cheese, whole grain cereal, veggies, cheese, beans, whole grain pasta, and occasionally meat. You'll notice these are all very quick and easy foods to prepare that require little or no cooking (except the meat, which he usually eats when we go to relatives' houses). I usually eat what he eats, with a few additions (things he can't eat yet like nuts).

I'm not looking for a way to eat packaged, processed food. Quite the opposite! However, I read that if you hate cooking, SBD may not be the right diet for you because part of it's allure is the ability to try new and creative recipes, and without trying new recipes, it will get boring. I have no desire to try new and creative recipes, just simple whole foods. I was just trying to find out if the SBD is possible for someone who prefers simplicity and ease to creativity and variety.

Ruthxxx
02-08-2005, 04:44 PM
Thanks for the clarification. I can stop worrying and Mother Henning.

egg yolks, oatmeal, yogurt, hummus, whole grain toast with tahini, fruits, cottage cheese, whole grain cereal, veggies, cheese, beans, whole grain pasta, and occasionally meat. All these foods are SBD friendly. The oatmeal, pasta, cereal, bread and fruit will have to wait until Phase II for you but you probably could get through Phase I on the foods listed. Read the Phase I Food List in the FAQ and see what you think.

(I love to cook but have not found this plan made me cook any more than usual.
On the other hand, cooking is a lifeskill and you could learn to love it!)

Bamiegurl
02-08-2005, 04:58 PM
I hate to cook but have no problem followin the plan. I'm not big on all the recipes and such I usually just stirfry meat and veggies. Quick and easy! Welcome aboard!

tlcstar
02-08-2005, 06:19 PM
You may also want to invest in a crockpot. I purchased one along with a cookbook, "The Everyday Low-Carb Slow Cooker Cookbook" by Brohier and Mayone. The book has recipes for everything and goes beyond your typical crock-pot stews. You can cook meatloaf, chicken, vegetables, breakfast stuff. Plus, a lot of the recipes in the SBD book are workable in the crockpot. It's really not cooking, just throwing the ingredients in and waiting 6-8hours. It's very easy!

HunnyBee
02-08-2005, 07:41 PM
HI, Welcome to the Beach!
I just wanted to say IM so glad your breastfeeding your child. It's the best reward you can give your baby. IM a breastfeeding advocate and said If I could bottle the goodness of breastfeeding I would be rich. :D

I agree with the crockpot thing. It's so easy anyone can do it! try www.crockerykitchen.com and look up ingredients that are SB friendly and modify recipes if need be... Gluck

chick_on_the_beach
02-08-2005, 07:59 PM
I don't spend a lot of time cooking and we eat really well. I cook eggs for breakfast but that is pretty easy. Lunch is often cold meat and salad and dinner is usually rump steak or boneless chicken breast with salad or steamed veges. I do stir fries sometimes because they are quick and easy. In winter I cook up a big pot of vegie soup on the weekend then usually have a bowl before dinner or sometimes have a couple of bowls for lunch. I also make a vegetarian chilli because I find the beans are filling enough with a pile of veges. These are things you could make in a crockpot.

There are healthy snacks and meals that don't require a lot of cooking, just preparation. They include vegie sticks with cottage cheese or hummus, yogurt, nuts, celery sticks with l/f cheese. It sounds like your preferred way of eating is very conducive with SB so you should be fine.

Marianna
02-08-2005, 10:15 PM
We focus on eating organic wholefoods here at home as well. I actually love to cook but there are many things that you could do to make it all easier... we order our fruit and vegies online and they have prepackaged freshly cut up packets of vegies for stirfrys and also for steaming. Just simply add some lean meat or fish maybe some noodles and your done. We eat couscous which is low GI and very easy to prepare.. just add some steamed vegies, some spices and some canned chickpeas.

We also have pasta here (you may not want to on phase 2) but just add some shop bought pesto a can of tuna, sliced olive and fetta cheese and basil leaves and that it also done. Being at uni three days a week and getting home late we also just have lean meats and fish with salad quite alot and we just a have a few different dressings.. the salads can also be bought precut and packaged.

Whatever you decide to do I hope it works well for you.

Marianna
02-08-2005, 10:16 PM
Ohh and by the way.. congratulations on still breastfeeding a 1 year old.. My daughter is 2.5 years and still going strong!

Gypsydancer
02-08-2005, 10:46 PM
Thank you for the ideas and responses!! I really appreciate it. I got a crockpot for Christmas and haven't used it, but I"m thinking it's about time. :o

And I'm thrilled to see breastfeeding moms here being successful on SBD :goodvibes That's been another of my concerns: you read about how it's important to lose weight slowly when you're nursing because of the release of toxins. I lost 15 pounds in January after giving up sweets and snacks, adding exercise, and abstaining from starches at dinner. While I'm thrilled with the weight loss, I'm concerned about the effect of continuing to eat as I was. So I'm thinking SB might work best for me. Then when my son weans, I'll go back and do Phase I.

I'm glad to meet all of you and look forward to getting to know you better!

ellis
02-09-2005, 09:03 AM
Darlene, welcome to the Beach! :wave:
I think it's great that you keep to simple foods... it can be a very healthy way of eating. (I hate to cook, too. :rolleyes: )
Good luck with the crockpot!!

Barb0522
02-09-2005, 10:49 AM
Welcome to the Beach, Darlene! And congratulations on continuing to breastfeed. My son gradually reduced the frequency on his own and weaned at age 3. At that point we changed our bedtime ritual to read in bed instead of nurse and we do that today.

I wasn't sure how to answer you before because I certainly do cook alot but then I love it. With what you are already cooking, you should be fine. And I find that my son eats a wider variety of vegetables than he used to.

beachgal
02-09-2005, 06:28 PM
I have to say that I love to cook too. :D Gypsy, you've completely trashed my whole idea that if I didn't love to cook so much, I wouldn't be fat! :o :lol: Oh well...

There are lots of great ideas here! Your menus for your son sound delicious, and I think you can continue in the same vein as long as you add more veggies for you. I find steaming veggies in the microwave to be so easy and fast. That method keeps the most nutrients...if you boil, the nutrients leach into the water and you lose some of them. If you steam, you lose less, but some still leach. Microwave, and you get to keep them all! ;) Try chopping up some broccoli (or buy it pre-chopped) and throw it in a container with a pop-up lid (I love the Pyrex dishes with blue lids that pop). Micro on high for 3-5 mins or until broccoli is light green. You can eat it just like that with some lemon on top, or put some smart balance (or other good-fat margarines) on top with salt and pepper.

You might find cooking more palatable if you do it all at once, then freeze or store the work you've done. I know someone on this board does a cook once a month thing and had a whole system...might be worth checking out.

AZLowcarber
02-10-2005, 10:48 AM
A crockpot will make cooking easy for you :)