Looking Good, Feeling Great - Stopping at overweight




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Dagny18
05-23-2014, 09:19 PM
I'm now 191 but I was 312. I was able to get down to 175 but for some reason am at 191 now...and trying to lose again. My coworker thinks that I should just be this weight. He says some people are not supposed to be small and there are stories of those who lost weight, felt awful and gained some weight back and felt better.
Has anyone decided to be overweight instead of a healthy weight to maintain? According to BMI (I am 5 feet 7 inches) I am at the high end of overweight, maybe even obese. I just don't like that...
But I eat healthy, workout. I wear a size Large in most clothes. I wear size 12-14 pants.
What do you think? Should I just try to accept my body as it is or kick myself in the butt and keep losing?


IanG
05-23-2014, 09:37 PM
It's up to you. Personally, I think you could get some more mileage yet based on your height and weight. But don't get obsessed about being "normal". My BMI is 25.2 (overweight) and normal (<25) just seems so untouchable even though I am clearly not "overweight".

katerina11
05-23-2014, 09:44 PM
it's debatable if you'll get health benefits from losing weight. currently the jury is out when you are in the "overweight" range of BMI. it depends on a whole host of issues.

if you are really interested about health benefits, i would suggest getting an accurate measurement of your bodyfat (bod pod would do) as well as a full checkup and then see what the results are.

is your bodyfat under 30%? if so, you are actually within the healthy range of bodyfat percentage for females.

how do you feel. how is your athletic ability? other questions to posit and mull over.

eta: i don't know if you do, but like another member here, who posted about loving her body, you should *definitely* love your body as is. IMHO!!


Just Dance Girl
05-24-2014, 03:19 AM
First, congratulations on your amazing success! I hope you feel very proud of your achievement and can see how far you've come.

I agree with getting a body fat measurement if you can. And consider your bone size, small or large?

Maybe you should just take a break and maintain for a while. Just enjoy your size and get some great clothes.

But please, feel successful!

Janet

thirti4thirty
05-24-2014, 04:22 AM
Wow, you've come a long way! Congrats!

When did you reach 175, and how long did it take for you to reach the current 191?

I'm asking because that data could help you MAKE YOUR OWN DECISION.

I stopped halfway twice before. Reason: I look at myself in the mirror and see a perfectly normal, cute and sexy body that I'm TOTALLY SATISFIED with. Sad to say, I have never ever been able to maintain it. It would take me months to lose, and weeks to come back to the obese category. And then the cycle would restart.

So this time around, I decided that I'm going to reach goal no matter what I think/feel, because my past failures have taught me that it's EVERYTHING OR NOTHING AT ALL.

So has this happened before? Do you feel it's likely to happen again? Do you feel it's better to leave a wider margin between 191 and the weight you don't ever want to cross again? If so, listen to your gut and continue to make efforts.

I agree with your coworker though, not everyone was made to be thin. BUT...this decision belongs to you and YOU ALONE to make. How would you know whether you were made to belong to the category of thin or not? By knowing your body, by experience, medical data etc So please focus on YOUR OWN PHYSICAL AND MENTAL WELL BEING. If being on the borderline makes you uncomfortable, leave yourself a reasonable margin for your own tranquility.

Don't forget that if you go back to your 312 all she can tell you is...sorry! So this is about you and you alone.

Best of lucks!

Pattience
05-24-2014, 05:03 AM
I think there are healthy benefits and other benefits to being in your healthy weight range.

You definitely can't argue against there being health benefits. If being overweight doesn't cause heart disease, it certainly causes joint disease so lose the weight and your joints will last longer.

Secondly physically its much more comfortable being in your healthy weight range. You can cross your legs easily. Sleep easily at night and be less likely to snore and have sleep apnoea. (another health benefit).

You will be more comfortable in planes and trains seats. When you are older, you will be more comfortable getting in and out of cars if not already.

Life is easier being smaller.

It will also save you lots of money on your grocery bills and clothing bills.

Ultimately you have to do what's comfortable. If it was me and i had to lose a lot of weight, i'd start saving from the beginning for any skin surgery you may want later on.

Its probably good you had a pause in your weightloss program. Its easier to lose weight if you do it slowly and pausing gives your body a chance to adjust to the new lower weight which means you are less likely to experience the famine reaction. The famine reaction is an automatic response of your body to losing a large amount of body fat. If you pause periodically on your way down you have a much better chance of being able to keep the weight off forever.

Certainly i don't think anyone is actually meant to be at a higher weight. If you want to be at a lower weight long term you need to change your eating habits permanently though. You can't continue eating a lot of food and you can't continue eating junk food on a regular basis. Anything that doesn't really provide much satisfaction will make you want to eat more while whole foods are more satisfying and you can feel more satisfied for longer so need to eat less over all.

katerina11
05-24-2014, 10:22 AM
pattience, you do realise that it's about body fat percentage rather than BMI, right? you can't POSSIBLY be thinking that BMI is the gold standard.

life is easier being stronger.

life is easier being happy.

PatLib
05-24-2014, 11:38 AM
Something similar happened to me at around 180. I plateaued and was getting frustrated. I decided just to work at maintenance, which taught me two things.

1. Maintenance is WAY harder than weight loss.

2. I realized really did want to reach my original goal weight.

I say just work at maintenance for 3 months and see how you feel after. Also, doing a practice maintenance run will help you if you decided to continue on losing weight. I think that the time off from weight loss actually helped me when I decided to continue losing weight again.

mars735
05-24-2014, 11:58 AM
Dagny: Congratulations on your mega-success!

I'm in the middle of reading Robert Lustig's Fat Chance. He's an acclaimed pediatric endocrinologist at UCSF med center with extensive clinical & research experience (as well as firsthand) in dealing with obesity.

I learned some interesting facts...BMI is useful in populations but virtually useless for an individual. Many people that it classifies as overweight are metabolically healthier than people that it classifies as normal BMI. BMI cannot tell the difference between lean mass and fat. More importantly for health, BMI does not distinguish between visceral fat and subcutaneous fat.

Visceral fat is in muscles and organs, and is associated with diseases of obesity like diabetes2, hypertension, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, etc. Subcutaneous fat is what we all see and want to shed, but is associated with longer life span and does not contribute to those diseases, according to the studies cited by Lustig. A thin-looking, low BMI person with high visceral fat is metabolically LESS healthy than an obese-looking, higher BMI person with little visceral fat.

He says that you can get expensive lab tests or MRI to determine your visceral fat. A cheaper way is to measure waist/hip ratio. .85 or below suggests a healthy range. Also belt size under 35", though this depends on where you where your belt of course.

Finally, he says one way to tell if you have insulin resistance is to "look at the back of your neck, armpits, and knuckles. What you're looking for is acanthosis nigricans, or a darkening, thickening, and ridging of the skin. Many people think this is dirt or, in the case of the neck, 'ring around the collar,' but it's actually excess insulin working on the skin.."

BigNomore71
05-24-2014, 02:53 PM
Ahhh.... I wish you had posted pictures of yourself, so we could see how you look.. whether upon looking, you seem like you have to lose weight... or not.

Even my body is not supposed to be 'petite' - my bone structure is large, hence always I go for the highest weight within the range of weight that is appropriate for my height. Going by this, you definitely can lose some more weight. Also, another point is that, if you go down another 20 lbs, later during maintenance, even if you were to gain some, you would still be within the 190 range and you can go back to losing immediately. You can have this 190 lbs as the cut-off or the highest weight you can afford to have and thus if you stay about 20 lbs lesser than this cut-off value, you can allow yourself some freedom in your food choices and exercising during maintenance. Hope this makes sense. :) If I were you, thus I would aim to be at 175.

Pattience
05-24-2014, 04:42 PM
Katerina i think if you reread my post you will notice i never ever mentioned BMI. I did mention body fat though didn't i.

4Health2
05-24-2014, 05:13 PM
How do YOU feel? What does your doctor think? If you are happy and healthy, then you are great where you are. If not, do whatever you need to be happy and healthy.

What has really surprised me on this journey is that in addition to the various compliments, some folks have discouraged me from losing weight and living health. Really?!? It was a shock.

I think we are about the same size. Personally, I am really glad to be at this weight now. I do want to lose a bit more, but my goals have shifted away from being about the numbers. Instead, I would like to feel more fit during workouts and have my size 12s comfortably rather than be too tight. That's me.

I've stalled for a bit and am getting refocused now. For me, it's not about kicking my *** to get going. It's about living the kind of healthy, active life that I want to live.

Dagny18
05-24-2014, 05:27 PM
Thanks for the responses. I think I just need a kick in the butt.
I don't know my body fat percentage. I think I am more of a pear shape though. I carry alot in my thighs and hips. Like I can wear smaller tops than I can pants and the only thing I can think of why this is would be my hips and thighs, right?
My belly is biggest around my belly button though it is just slightly larger than my public bones-not sure how to explain that. I think that if I were to get rid of any of the excess skin though from being larger, it might actually be smaller. I think its 40 inches at the belly button though. I think if I were to have a goal it would be 35 inch waist though I know I can't choose where my body wants to lose.
Going from 175 to 191 took about 2 years I would say. I was trying to maintain and went from college student to working. And I think that now I am actually more active than before. I am a receptionist, I am on my feet alot in the office. I have a Fitbit and whenever I wear it I usually get 4,000 to 5,000 steps in my work day. That is not counting exercise.
Exercise wise I did slow down on cardio and added more strength training. But I can't imagine that I gained that much muscle? I honestly don't have heavy dumbbells but I workout at home and am always adding stuff to my "gym" I now have a Total Gym that I use. I have up to 15 pound dumbbells and did Chalean Extreme. I did Turbo Fire. I just finished Xfactor St. I am not the most athletic but I can modify anything that is too difficult. I walk at a nearby park and timing myself I can finish the mile (walking and jogging) in 15 minutes.
Also I eat healthier than I did even at 175. At 175 I ate more processed foods and carbs. Like I would have a sandwich for lunch and lots of bread. Its odd...I now fewer carbs and weigh more? I know I need to really track calories because healthy does not equal low calorie. But now I guess I place more importance on food quality than calories. I started eating more meat like chicken and turkey and make salads for lunch with them. I measure out my salad dressing. I never really measured everything when I was losing weight...

katerina11
05-24-2014, 05:37 PM
Sometimes it's hard to see how one's advice may be triggering and/or not helpful.

I think there are healthy benefits and other benefits to being in your healthy weight range.

Please define healthy *weight* range. this has nothing to do with body fat percentages.

You definitely can't argue against there being health benefits. If being overweight doesn't cause heart disease, it certainly causes joint disease so lose the weight and your joints will last longer.

you definitely can argue (and another poster gave out some great information from lustig) about health benefits while being "overweight" (which is currently only defined by BMI, so you have implicity referred to BMI here, pattience).

Secondly physically its much more comfortable being in your healthy weight range. You can cross your legs easily. Sleep easily at night and be less likely to snore and have sleep apnoea. (another health benefit).

healthy weight range again. see, you do not mention BMI, but the standard used to define "healthy" "overweight" and "obese" all hinge on the BMI.

You will be more comfortable in planes and trains seats. When you are older, you will be more comfortable getting in and out of cars if not already.

you have no idea exactly how big or small anyone is by their given weight.

Life is easier being smaller.

life can be pretty difficult when "smaller," as well.

It will also save you lots of money on your grocery bills and clothing bills.

Ultimately you have to do what's comfortable. If it was me and i had to lose a lot of weight, i'd start saving from the beginning for any skin surgery you may want later on.

Its probably good you had a pause in your weightloss program. Its easier to lose weight if you do it slowly and pausing gives your body a chance to adjust to the new lower weight which means you are less likely to experience the famine reaction. The famine reaction is an automatic response of your body to losing a large amount of body fat. If you pause periodically on your way down you have a much better chance of being able to keep the weight off forever.

Certainly i don't think anyone is actually meant to be at a higher weight. If you want to be at a lower weight long term you need to change your eating habits permanently though. You can't continue eating a lot of food and you can't continue eating junk food on a regular basis. Anything that doesn't really provide much satisfaction will make you want to eat more while whole foods are more satisfying and you can feel more satisfied for longer so need to eat less over all.

i also think pauses are a great idea.

what exactly do you mean by you don't think that anyone is meant to be at a higher weight? what is "higher" weight.

you claim that you don't mention BMI, and while technically this is true, you are all over the place in your post discussing how people need to be at a lower weight.

and that just isn't true. people need to be where they are comfortable and happy, first off. and if you want to just discuss physiologic health, then more useful terms would center around hip to waist ratio, body fat percentage and visceral vs subq fat, and other health measures. discussing people in terms of being smaller or bigger really is outmoded, especially when you are discussing the BMI range of "overweight"

katerina11
05-24-2014, 05:44 PM
dagny it sounds like you have incorporated a lot of positive changes that will lead to better health. the question of needing to lose more weight really comes down to how you feel about yourself and your current health and what your doc says, like some people upthread have mentioned.

i am very exercise oriented so tend to put that out there, but IMO it's a very personal thing.

katerina11
05-24-2014, 05:45 PM
Katerina i think if you reread my post you will notice i never ever mentioned BMI. I did mention body fat though didn't i.

i hope my quoting your post and pointing out the terms you used is helpful. :)

Dagny18
05-24-2014, 06:22 PM
http://www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_photo_gallery_enlarge.asp?id=4804622

Here is a recent photo of me. My dress is a size large. I do look better with clothes on but I wouldn't take pics without covering my stomach...
I should take new pics since I finished a new workout dvd program and plan to start another beginning of next month.

Dagny18
05-24-2014, 06:24 PM
Oh my picture didn't show up....

http://www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_photo_gallery_enlarge.asp?id=4804622

http://photos-ak.sparkpeople.com/nw/1/6/l1629519511.jpg

Dagny18
05-24-2014, 06:39 PM
You will be more comfortable in planes and trains seats. When you are older, you will be more comfortable getting in and out of cars if not already.


Certainly i don't think anyone is actually meant to be at a higher weight. If you want to be at a lower weight long term you need to change your eating habits permanently though. You can't continue eating a lot of food and you can't continue eating junk food on a regular basis. Anything that doesn't really provide much satisfaction will make you want to eat more while whole foods are more satisfying and you can feel more satisfied for longer so need to eat less over all.

I can fit into seats easily. I don't think that is a problem anymore.
Oh and I don't eat junk food on a regular basis. On a weekly basis I don't always eat junk food. I tend to like maybe a hershey kiss or little piece of chocolate after dinner but I don't do that everyday. I was having "desert" which to me became a cookie or 2 and some 30 calorie hot chocolate. I have been teaching myself portion control, stop at 1 or 2 cookies.

On the weekends I tend to let myself have a little ice cream. But again I don't always have that. It depends on if I am craving it and during the winter when its cold I don't always crave it. Sometimes a box of ice cream can sit in the freezer for a month without me touching it.

BigNomore71
05-24-2014, 07:57 PM
You have a beautiful face, Dagny!

From the photo it does not seem like you have to lose weight. :cool:

Dagny18
05-24-2014, 09:34 PM
Thanks!! Actually I got my hair cut and wear it down more. I actually don't like my face and so I feel leaving my hair down hides my face...
I know by seeing pictures of successful people, I know that my stomach is not as flat as it could be. I could lose more but when I say that people always ask why. I guess I just carry my weight well and don't look like I weigh as much as I do.
I think that is what my coworker means when he thinks I should just stay where I am. That I look ok now...and to stop worrying about it.
I was about 197 around Christmas but I managed to get down to 191. Only my body seems to like staying in the 190s. I am not sure if this is where I am supposed to be or if I should lose more. I know I will never be tiny but I just want to be normal I guess...

PatLib
05-25-2014, 09:24 AM
BMI is useful tool but necessarily not to be the only thing to be used for a diagnosis.

If you are outside the "normal" BMI it is something to investigate deeper. You my discover that the weight you are currently at is good for your physical and mental health or you may discover that you do need to lose more weight. Yes, there are many studies showing you can be metabolically healthy and overweight. But there are studies that show that two people with equal health test results, the thinner person will have better health long term.

However, the differences were minimal and personally I WOULD shave a year off my life to eat cheese! :)

CAPECODWOMAN
05-25-2014, 09:54 AM
Personally, I hate looking at BMI!! At most, I should weight 135 at my height. I have not seen 135 since grade school! I have always had a more muscular, athletic build so I have always been "overweight" according to BMI, even at my healthiest.

I set my goal at 150 because this is not only a reasonable goal for me to maintain but I feel like I look good and I know I feel good at that weight.
You have achieved an amazing weight loss! Find a weight that you are comfortable with how you look and feel and that you can maintain. I have read that the up and down of the scale sometimes takes more of a toll on a body than just maintaining a weight that is slightly higher than recommended!

mars735
05-25-2014, 11:48 AM
BMI is useful tool but necessarily not to be the only thing to be used for a diagnosis.

If you are outside the "normal" BMI it is something to investigate deeper. You my discover that the weight you are currently at is good for your physical and mental health or you may discover that you do need to lose more weight. Yes, there are many studies showing you can be metabolically healthy and overweight. But there are studies that show that two people with equal health test results, the thinner person will have better health long term.

However, the differences were minimal and personally I WOULD shave a year off my life to eat cheese! :)

I hear ya!!! :)
The book I mentioned, Fat Chance, was an eye opener for me, though I know it's not set in stone. If you have excessive visceral fat, especially in the liver, the data he cited indicate your life span can be shortened by as much as 10-20 years. At the same time, people with subcutaneous fat, aka big butts as he puts it, but little visceral/organ fat, live longer than very thin people. If you have both? This claim is based upon looking at populations, not individuals. And it doesn't factor in the stress of pounds on our joints, among other things.

I'd approach even the most well-designed obesity studies with a big 'wait and see' attitude and stick to something that feels good and is sustainable. Yet, the info that Lustig provided in his book has given me some freedom from obsessing over little curves & bumps that I might see in the mirror. "Perfect" is a very relative term!

katerina11
05-25-2014, 12:20 PM
BMI is useful tool but necessarily not to be the only thing to be used for a diagnosis.

If you are outside the "normal" BMI it is something to investigate deeper. You my discover that the weight you are currently at is good for your physical and mental health or you may discover that you do need to lose more weight. Yes, there are many studies showing you can be metabolically healthy and overweight. But there are studies that show that two people with equal health test results, the thinner person will have better health long term.

However, the differences were minimal and personally I WOULD shave a year off my life to eat cheese! :)

And there are also studies that show that people who are "overweight" by BMI classification have a lower mortality rate with diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/36/Supplement_2/S276.full

katerina11
05-25-2014, 12:23 PM
I'd approach even the most well-designed obesity studies with a big 'wait and see' attitude and stick to something that feels good and is sustainable. Yet, the info that Lustig provided in his book has given me some freedom from obsessing over little curves & bumps that I might see in the mirror. "Perfect" is a very relative term!


this is exactly where i am with all of this. i focus on building muscle mass, trying to shed some excess fat that i am unhappy with, make exercise a part of everyday life, keep the general eating pattern towards whole foods and live as happily as i can within those parameters.

PatLib
05-25-2014, 05:25 PM
And there are also studies that show that people who are "overweight" by BMI classification have a lower mortality rate with diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/36/Supplement_2/S276.full

My point is that you can always find studies to prove your point especially if you are entrenched in that point of view. MOST studies are studying something very specific and people either want to believe they apply to them or don't want to believe it. Which is why I pointed out there are conflicting studies on weight.

Obesity is complex issue involving societal, physical, genetic, cultural, and emotional issues on a larger and individual scale. Something NO study covers.

For example, my issues with weight are highly effected by my Latino culture and how we treat food in my culture. Something some of you might not experience.

Pattience
05-25-2014, 06:49 PM
i hope my quoting your post and pointing out the terms you used is helpful. :)

Katerina

I find your long post obnoxious so i can't be assed responding to it.

I stand by what i posted. If you don't like it, that's your problem. If you don't agree that's your prerogative. I maintain your arguments are incomplete and incorrect.

If the OP doesn't want to take on my opinion, that's her choice. I don't feel the need or inclination to say any more. Not because i couldn't argue the case but i think for anyone with an open mind, its clear enough. I've just got better things to do.

Pattience
05-25-2014, 06:57 PM
Dagny, you look nice and not obese but whether you lose more weight is entirely up to you.

re the visceral fat idea. I understand that the people more prone to that are those with apple shaped figures. The pear shapes are less likely to get that problem. Though i don't know what happens when all types get really large.

This is from the visceral/abdominal fat entry on wikipedia.

Abdominal obesity, also known as belly fat or clinically as central obesity, is excessive abdominal fat around the stomach and abdomen. There is a strong correlation between central obesity and cardiovascular disease.[1] Abdominal obesity is not confined only to the elderly and obese subjects.[2] Abdominal obesity has been linked to Alzheimer's Disease as well as other metabolic and vascular diseases.[3]

Visceral and central abdominal fat and waist circumference show a strong association with type 2 diabetes.[4]

Visceral fat, also known as organ fat or intra-abdominal fat, is located inside the peritoneal cavity, packed in between internal organs and torso, as opposed to subcutaneous fat‚ which is found underneath the skin, and intramuscular fat‚ which is found interspersed in skeletal muscle. Visceral fat is composed of several adipose depots including mesenteric, epididymal white adipose tissue (EWAT) and perirenal fat. An excess of visceral fat is known as central obesity, the "pot belly" or "beer belly" effect, in which the abdomen protrudes excessively. This body type is also known as "apple shaped‚" as opposed to "pear shaped‚" in which fat is deposited on the hips and buttocks. Scientists have come to recognize that body fat, instead of body weight, is the key to evaluating obesity.[citation needed]

Researchers first started to focus on abdominal obesity in the 1980s when they realized that it had an important connection to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Abdominal obesity was more closely related with metabolic dysfunctions connected with cardiovascular disease than was general obesity. In the late 1980s and early 1990s insightful and powerful imaging techniques were discovered that would further help advance our understanding of the health risks associated with body fat accumulation. Techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging made it possible to categorize mass of adipose tissue located at the abdominal level into intra-abdominal fat and subcutaneous fat.[5]

katerina11
05-25-2014, 11:02 PM
Katerina

I find your long post obnoxious so i can't be assed responding to it.

I stand by what i posted. If you don't like it, that's your problem. If you don't agree that's your prerogative. I maintain your arguments are incomplete and incorrect.

If the OP doesn't want to take on my opinion, that's her choice. I don't feel the need or inclination to say any more. Not because i couldn't argue the case but i think for anyone with an open mind, its clear enough. I've just got better things to do.

:?: huh. You said that you weren't talking about BMI, but rather body fat? And then I pointed out that you were, in fact, not discussing body fat, but using very different words, such as bigger and smaller and heavier and over weight, etc.



PatLib, I realise, of course, that studies often have inherent bias, and metanalysis are more reliable than individual studies.

I was impressed by the fact that diabetes.org, a pretty conservative organization, feels comfortable enough to report it.

Pattience
05-26-2014, 08:55 AM
The famine reaction is an automatic response of your body to losing a large amount of body fat.

Quoting from myself here Katerina.

Secondly let me quote from a book i'm currently reading, which is not about what i said or didn't say but more to the point of what matters here:

The book:
Don't Go Hungry for Life by Dr Amanda Sainsbury-Salis who is a scientist who has made the study of medical science and obesity her life's work. She was obese as a young woman so its not just a job but persona. This is her second book. Her first was called The Don't Go Hungry Diet. She has a very credible list of credentials behind her. in 2008 she was selected by the International Association for the Study of Obesity to the be the chairperson of the International Conference for sex and obesity in Bangkok.

"Chapter 3 How much weight do you need to lose?

…"In this chapter i am going to explain the the acid test that will reveal exactly what weight you're biologically meant to be. But first i'm going to explain how you can get a useful ballpark estimate of your ideal weight and size based on crude measure of body mass index and waist and hip circumference. This information is based on estimates drawn from medical research as to which values of BMI and waist or hip circumference are healthy for most people [my emphasis]. I'll then show you how to narrow down your search and pinpoint the optimum weight for you.

"Get a ballpark estimate of your ideal weight and size.

"One way to get a broad estimate of your ideal healthy weight is to calculate your body mass indices.

…"current research suggests that having a BMI of 25kg/msquare or above puts you at significantly higher risk of hypertension, metabolic disease such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease. The greater your BMI, the greater your risk…"



"every time i punch these numbers into my calculator, i'm acutely aware of the fact that, at my usual weight of 65kg, i'm 1.3 kilos overweight according to the WHO! Its important to know that BMI is not the only determinant of your ideal weight or metabolic health, and that BMI is not a validated predictor of disease risk in children, in adults who have not finished growing, in adults who are naturally very lean or very muscular, in people from certain racial or ethnic groups or in adults over the age of 65. This is illustrated by the fact that many olympic atheletes have a BMI that places them in the overweight or obese category as definite by the WHO, although metabolically they are extremely fit. On the other hand, some people with a BMI in the normal range store excess fat around the midriff , and this places them at significantly higher risk of metabolic diseases.


...

"Waist Circumference

When it comes to being healthy, its not so much ow much you weigh but how much fat you have on your body and where you store it that counts. Carrying too much fat around the midriff, especially in the visceral space around the organs such as the intestines, liver and pancreas (belly fat) is linked with significantly higher risk of preventable lifestyle disease such as diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers. Research shows that most Caucasion and Asian women with a waist circumference of 80cm or over and most Caucasian men with a waist circumference of 94cm or above are at significantly greater risk of developing preventable lifestyle disease and metabolic complications, regardless of how tall they are … For women and men with waist circumferences greater than or equal to 88 or 102 cm, respectively, the risk of metabolic complications is even higher."



"Waist to hip ratio
"…in a review i recently co-authored for the International journal Obesity Reviews, several epidemiological studies suggest that having ah ugh waist-to-hop ratio (that is your waist circumference divided by your hip circumference_ is a better predictor of death from cardiovascular disease than having a large waist, regardless of your waist circumference of how much belly fat you have. In brief, if you're a sufficiently pear-shaped, your risk of dying from metabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease may be less than that of most people who are more apple-hspaed, even if you're larger overall.

"Are you an apple or a pear

"To calculate your waist to hip ratio, divide your waist circumference as determined above by your hip circumference

...

" In terms of metabolic health, research suggest that if you waist to hip ratio is less than .8 for women and less than .9 for men, you're doing well. "

There's nothing like a regular check-up

BMI and waist and hip circumference are helpful tools for estimating and comparing the overall metabolic health of populations, butr are not accurate tools for determining the health of individuals. To get an accurate assessment of your own metabolic health and risk of ideas, see your doctor for a full check-up.

Fine-tuning your weight and and size targets….. you'll have to read the book if you want to know what she says. The thing is, i'd have to type too much more but for the sake of this to and fro with Katerina, i think i've said enough about where i'm coming from.

But she does summarise the chapter thus:
As a first step towards determining your ideal healthy size and weight, its helpful to take stock of how you measure up against research into metabolic health. If your BMI is over 25kg/m squared and your less than 65 years of age, then aiming for a BMI of 24.9 or less is a prudent move. Additionally if your waist circumference is 80cm or more for Causasian or Asian women […] then stripping weight until you waist falls under these cut-offs points is one of the best things you can do for your long term health and longevity. Every kilo you lose will result in a loss of approximately 1 cm from your waist.

CAPECODWOMAN
05-31-2014, 10:12 AM
I just bought a very useful tool that relates to this topic! I bought a scale that measures not only your weight but also your muscle and fat so you have a more accurate idea of your health as a whole. It was only $40 on amazon and I am very happy with it so far! May help you decide if you are ready to maintain or should lose more.

mars735
05-31-2014, 10:23 PM
I have a scale that measures those things but these home scales are notoriously inaccurate other than weight, at best. Still, I use it to track my own trends. I know that once my fat % is over 25, I need to take action & under 24 is correlates with feeling well and fit. But I don't believe the numbers correspond to the actual amount of fat on me, in terms of health risks.

The problems with waist & hip measurements are finding the right place to measure and consistently taking measurements in the same place.

berryblondeboys
05-31-2014, 10:39 PM
People just need to remember that even overweight is still better than obese. Every 10 lbs or so pounds has an impact on your health - and that varies from person to person. So... If it is easy enough for you to maintain 190 and impossible to maintain 175, stay at 190. Have a line in the sand number that is for your "must not go over".

For me... I wanted so desperately to get below 25%body fat! but it was killing me as if I ate one thing extra in a day! that meant maintenance for that day. I had to be so utterly perfect with exercise and eating every single day, that I was beginning to go crazy trying to get to 160 when I was for a second, 165 (and 25.5-26% body fat)

I now realize that 175 is fine for me. Ideally, according to doctors is 155-160, but if I can't maintain that but can maintain 175, then that is what I will do. It is by far better than what I just did to re ballooning back up to 243.6!

mars735
05-31-2014, 10:52 PM
People just need to remember that even overweight is still better than obese. Every 10 lbs or so pounds has an impact on your health - and that varies from person to person. So... If it is easy enough for you to maintain 190 and impossible to maintain 175, stay at 190. Have a line in the sand number that is for your "must not go over".

For me... I wanted so desperately to get below 25%body fat! but it was killing me as if I ate one thing extra in a day! that meant maintenance for that day. I had to be so utterly perfect with exercise and eating every single day, that I was beginning to go crazy trying to get to 160 when I was for a second, 165 (and 25.5-26% body fat)

I now realize that 175 is fine for me. Ideally, according to doctors is 155-160, but if I can't maintain that but can maintain 175, then that is what I will do. It is by far better than what I just did to re ballooning back up to 243.6!

I totally agree with these wise words. Sometimes 'the enemy of good is better'. Perfectionism leas to all sorts of crazy eating behaviors for me. And makes me postpone living my life to the fullest.

Lunula
06-03-2014, 03:15 PM
Huge congrats on your weight loss - that is AMAZING!

I was actually stuck at 160 for a looooong time. I kept thinking I wanted to lose that last 20, since 160 is technically still overweight for someone 5'6. I just could not motivate myself to do it, ya know? I was making much healthier choices, working out, etc. - and I was maintaining 160 completely, but I just could not get myself into "weight loss mode" again. So, I concentrated on maintaining, instead. I ended up losing another 10 lbs over the next 6 months or so because I was trying to learn how to cook and trying new recipes and also trying new stuff at the gym to stay interested - it just came off naturally. I would've been happy at 160, but was happy at 150, too.

I think it's totally fine to concentrate on maintaining (temporarily or permanently) - but I think it needs to be your decision and not based on what someone at work says. If you are happy where you are, then stick with it. If you want to try losing again in a year or whatever, then it's a lot easier to do that starting from 190 than from 240+!!!

ubergirl
06-07-2014, 09:54 PM
I know this is an old thread but it caught my eye.

I'm just a hair under 5'8" and when I lost 110 lbs, I simply could not shove my body below 190. I did go down to 186, for a week or two, but running 3 miles a day 4-5 x a week and keeping my calories at or just below 1200 I still maintained around 190-193.

I had a body fat analysis and it was 32% which the doctor said was normal for my age.

I liked how I looked, but it still niggled me and I still kept trying to push lower.

I wish I had made a definite decision to maintain around 190-195. I did manage to maintain in that range for about a year, but always with the idea that I was failing to go lower.

Now, since I regain, I wish I had picked a higher goal than normal BMI first time around. Now I've set 195 as my goal, which is just inside the "overweight" range for my height.

Here is a pic of me three years ago at 190. I'm wearing an XL workout shirt that was, at the time too big.