General chatter - Any cat experts?




View Full Version : Any cat experts?


PatLib
04-08-2014, 07:43 PM
So, I am pretty sure my cat has a UTI, I already have an appointment with the vet for the morning and while I have always volunteered at animal shelters I actually never owned a pet because I always lived with people allergic so I have no dealings with vets.

So, I guess what I am asking is how do I know what is a reasonable tests, etc. for my cat when I take? I have been taken advantage twice by vets while pet sitting (one guy actually ended up losing his license for fraud so thankfully my friend didn't have to pay that bill). Any advice? I have done an internet search but I'd like some more advice from experienced people here!


JayZeeJay
04-08-2014, 08:06 PM
Hi PatLib,

I'll try to answer this briefly (I'm a veterinarian). First, to work up a cat for a suspected UTI, a urinalysis test is required. To obtain urine from a cat, a bladder ultrasound is generally required as they are unwilling to pee in a cup (unlike dogs and humans), so the urine is removed directly via cystocentesis. This procedure has the additional advantage of revealing any abnormalities within the bladder (stones (calculi), tumors/growths, etc.) that may be causing urinary tract symptoms. Once urine is obtained, the urinalysis can either be performed in-house or sent to a referral lab, depending on the expertise of your veterinary practice.

UTI is quite uncommon overall in cats, and is far more common in female than male cats. Other urinary problems are more common, and can include a variety of causes such as irritation from crystals in the urine (the urinalysis will help to diagnose this). Urinary stones are also a common finding in cats, and will be diagnosed via the bladder ultrasound. The type of crystal in the urine, if present, will help to guide the treatment. If your cat is a male, urinary problems can present a very serious danger as the urethra can become blocked, a fatal condition if untreated. I am glad to hear that you have an appointment. If you have a male cat and he is not urinating at all, it is an emergency and you should take him in today/tonight.

Some cats have a condition that is analogous to a human condition (interstitial cystitis) in which the bladder is chronically or repeatedly inflamed without a clear cause. There are treatments to help manage this condition in cats. Let us know what they find!

PatLib
04-08-2014, 08:22 PM
He is male but he is still urinating (he just did in fact just not much). My vet told me it should be okay until morning since he isn't complaining, he is playing and seems to be eating and drinking normally. He also didn't complain when I felt his belly he actually enjoyed it and did his typical purring and roll over.

Should I still take him in tonight?


EagleRiverDee
04-08-2014, 08:59 PM
I was going to answer but see JayZeeJay has already given you expert advice so I will say:

A) I hope your cat is ok!
B) Thanks to JayZeeJay for being willing to share expertise here.

PatLib
04-08-2014, 09:09 PM
Yes thank you!

JayZeeJay
04-08-2014, 09:19 PM
You're welcome!

If he is still urinating, is acting normally and has a non-painful abdomen, it does not sound like a "today emergency". Tomorrow should be fine - just keep an eye on him until then.

PatLib
04-09-2014, 06:46 PM
So, he does have a UTI and have to give him meds.

But I was wondering what is the best wet food to prevent UTIs. My doctor prescribed me Hill's C/D Urinary Tract Health but after lots of researching it seems that some people have complained about the long term use of it plus it is expensive.

Is there a cheaper but still good wet food?

JayZeeJay
04-10-2014, 12:43 PM
The c/d diet is formulated to control and reduce the formation of two main types of urinary crystals, struvite and oxalate. It is not a preventative for UTI, per se. Control of these urinary crystals is very important in a male cat to prevent urethral blockage. Did they find one of these crystal types on the urinalysis? If so, this diet is a good idea - it can dissolve the crystals and prevent new ones from forming.

For cats that don't like the c/d diet, there are a few alternatives including Royal Canin Urinary SO cat food. Cost-wise, I'm not sure if it is much cheaper than the c/d - it depends where you can get it. Some cats can eventually be weaned back to a "regular" cat food diet once the crystals are gone but I don't often recommend it, in case the kitty winds up back where it started, or worse. Some clients choose to make homemade cat food instead, and there are recipes for appropriate urinary-friendly diets.

Maintaining good hydration is important for urinary health, so you can either feed wet food (+/- dry), or feed dry food and add some fluid to the kitty's diet separately, e.g. "tuna water" or diluted broth.

Chubbie Chick
04-10-2014, 01:09 PM
Hi PatLib,

I'll try to answer this briefly (I'm a veterinarian). First, to work up a cat for a suspected UTI, a urinalysis test is required. To obtain urine from a cat, a bladder ultrasound is generally required as they are unwilling to pee in a cup (unlike dogs and humans), so the urine is removed directly via cystocentesis. This procedure has the additional advantage of revealing any abnormalities within the bladder (stones (calculi), tumors/growths, etc.) that may be causing urinary tract symptoms. Once urine is obtained, the urinalysis can either be performed in-house or sent to a referral lab, depending on the expertise of your veterinary practice.

UTI is quite uncommon overall in cats, and is far more common in female than male cats. Other urinary problems are more common, and can include a variety of causes such as irritation from crystals in the urine (the urinalysis will help to diagnose this). Urinary stones are also a common finding in cats, and will be diagnosed via the bladder ultrasound. The type of crystal in the urine, if present, will help to guide the treatment. If your cat is a male, urinary problems can present a very serious danger as the urethra can become blocked, a fatal condition if untreated. I am glad to hear that you have an appointment. If you have a male cat and he is not urinating at all, it is an emergency and you should take him in today/tonight.

Some cats have a condition that is analogous to a human condition (interstitial cystitis) in which the bladder is chronically or repeatedly inflamed without a clear cause. There are treatments to help manage this condition in cats. Let us know what they find!

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU. You have helped me immensely!