Weight Loss Support - I have fallen off the wagon




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lucky216
03-18-2014, 08:39 PM
A couple of years ago I started a weight loss journey. I was dedicated and no one was going to stop me from achieving my goals!!! I did an amazing job (lost 80 lbs). I ate healthy, worked out nearly everyday, and I felt pretty darn awesome :) Then I tore my ACL. My activity has been very limited since last October. At first I was slowly gaining weight here and there. Then it began to PILE back on (gained back 50). The more weight I gain the more depressed I get and the more I eat. I am not able to work right now due to my slow recovery. I continue to make excuses as to why I can't lose weight, but the truth is I am not loosing weight because I am not eating right. Whether or not I can move is not the determining factor for losing weight. I am addicted to food, and I just can't seem to escape the hold it has over me. HELP please. I need an intervention. BTW my ticker is way off...


MauiKai
03-18-2014, 08:44 PM
Well, weight loss is 80% diet, so even if you're unable to exercise you can still lose weight. What sort of things are trigger foods for you? What food plans have you tried in the past?

lucky216
03-18-2014, 08:55 PM
I love carbs and sweets. They are my weakness. I have done the weight watcher plan with great success. It's just that I let myself have a treat and then another and then another and so on.... I am out of control! I love healthy food, but I love crappy food as well.


kelijpa
03-18-2014, 09:19 PM
You're taking the first step up the ladder to get back on the wagon, being aware that you want to change.

You know you can succeed because you were successful in the past.

I'm a regainer, never thought at 50 I would be able to lose it again, but I have, and am really determined to live a healthy lifestyle, I exercise but pretty gently, mostly walking, some recumbent bike and light (6 lb) weights. I do all those little things like making myself get up from the desk, park where I have to walk up stairs to come into work, walk down for the mail. I've read that even fidgeting burns calories, you don't have to be extreme, just try to develop some active habits.

Start keeping track of what you eat, I find that naturally starts me eating less, just paying attention to what's going in, again, be gentle, you can fast if that's what you love, but you don't need to, you need to swap some fruit and veggies for sweets and carbs, allow yourself a treat when you need one so you don't feel deprived, that can lead to unhealthy behaviors.

Most of all, just get started, I find the less of a big deal I make of it, the more successful I am, I don't have to have all the measuring cups and scales in place to get on track, I just need to pay attention.

Wishing you the best of luck, you'll do great!
:sunny:

kelijpa
03-18-2014, 09:20 PM
By the way WW is great and you know what the base of the program is, keeping track, journaling. :D

newleaf123
03-18-2014, 09:34 PM
Most of all, just get started, I find the less of a big deal I make of it, the more successful I am, I don't have to have all the measuring cups and scales in place to get on track, I just need to pay attention.
:sunny:

^^^ wise words above ^^^ I couldn't agree more. Sometimes I feel like I get so wrapped up in the whole affair that I either undo myself or make it seem insurmountable to reconvene when necessary.

Best if luck to you :twirly:

lucindaarrowspark
03-18-2014, 09:41 PM
OK Lucky216! You have named and identified your addiction. You are an addict. Like me. I am a sugar addict who was well on her way to becoming an alcohol addict too. I have tricked myself into thinking I could eat whole wheat pasta and whole wheat sugar free bread and beat this addiction. NO I COULD NOT!
I have thrown off the shackles of addiction by naming the enemy... I can not eat any wheat, corn, anything with sugar ever. EVER. I am done lying to myslef. I reject low calorie pretend food. I eat everything that is a vegetable . I have gained control by juicing, by eating salads without oil dressings and I am no longer eating a whole can of beans by myslef.
You can kick your sugar addiction.

lucky216
03-18-2014, 09:54 PM
All of you are so awesome. Thank you for you wise words and support. It helps to share my struggles. Not only do I get great advise, but now someone other than me knows. As silly as it may sound I feel more accountable now that it's out there. I will conquer my addiction (with a lot of help).

GetHealthy
03-18-2014, 11:47 PM
I get in a really bad habit of just starting down the wrong track, and then continuing. I'm terrible with moderation, so for me it's easiest to just quit unhealthy foods cold turkey instead of trying to eat a small amount because I totally over do it. I have had ups and downs. I find that jumpstarting your weight loss is really helpful because it keeps you so motivated when you see the numbers go down. To jumpstart my weight loss this time (because I haven't been having much success counting calories) I am going to do a 15 day challenge that is essentially a grape fast. After that I am going to join weight watchers because I think they will be able to teach me portion control, which is one of my biggest issues!

RareandUnknown931319
03-19-2014, 12:03 AM
Everybody has fallen off the wagon some way or another. We all get those cravings that just won't go away until we give in! So don't feel too bad and don't be too hard on yourself. Try indulging in your favorite treat twice a week, and make your hands into fists for 20 seconds. It's called muscling your way to more willpower, it works! I you do those two things, you'll think twice next time you want a piece of pie or a cookie. I swear! Just keep moving forward!:)

Koshka
03-19-2014, 12:46 AM
I find that for certain foods that I have trouble controlling how much I eat (I also do WW), it is better for me to just not have those foods in the house. For some of them, I may be able to eat a single portion while somewhere else (a cookie at Subway) but I can't buy packages of them for the house. Since I started doing it that way, things have been much, much easier.

MauiKai
03-19-2014, 07:03 AM
Koshka is right, if you can't handle it, don't bring it home! I know that if I bring home things that trigger me I WILL eat them. And not reasonably. I have, in the past, made a sheet cake and by the next morning I am scrubbing the empty baking dish. I will not bring failure in to my house anymore. Recently my friend's kids were all selling GSCs. I bought a few from each and upon receipt they promptly got delivered to other people, not me. I'd eat the whole box.

So don't bring failure home.

Sometimes it's hard because my DH loves junk. While he could lose a few pounds, for him, it's literally just a few pounds. So no big deal if he wants junk, he can afford it. But I just tell him "I cannot have that in the house and stay on track." And he understands and wants to help me, so he refrains. If he wants junk he'll go out and get a single serving from DQ or whatnot rather than bringing it home. Enlist your family to help you!

seagirl
03-19-2014, 07:23 AM
Update your ticker. Update the number in your sidebar. Look at them. Then make a plan for tomorrow. Like an addict, take it one day at a time. One meal at a time. one choice at a time.

Pattience
03-19-2014, 07:53 AM
I love carbs and sweets. They are my weakness. I have done the weight watcher plan with great success. It's just that I let myself have a treat and then another and then another and so on.... I am out of control! I love healthy food, but I love crappy food as well.

Well except for the WW plan, this is my past. I also once was doing really well with a weight loss program some years ago. That was in about 2000 and i had taken up triathlon. Got all lovely and skinny and super fit and then guess what, i injured the ligaments in my knee, got a job or vice versa and then things rapidly went downhill. I don't remember sweets being a huge for me at that time. They became a bigger issue for as the years have gone on.

Three years ago i did my first diet when i thought thats it, no more sweets and i thought a fair bit about quitting sweets forever. That diet that started out with three months at home and turned into another two months of a cycle journey when i got really skinny. Then i came home and i can't remember the details now but it all came undone. I think it was 2011.

My weight has gone up and down since then until January this year and i decided ok i'm doing a diet this time with exercise not being a formal part of it, though later on in the year i want to train up for a 10km race (which could bugger everything up again if not careful).

So i am on the quit sweets method again. I just eat good nutritious foods and sweets of all kinds except fruit is NOT verboten. Fruit is not as sweet as everything else so it doesn't cause me to binge or over eat. I find sweets make me less interested in healthy food. So they are gone gone gone. And i don't miss them at all. that's the beauty of quitting sweets.

I am also getting more and more comfortable about not eating them in my diet, except on really rare occasions when i feel it might be safe to do so. But i don't want to push my luck so the sweets on offer have to be pretty darn good before i will indulge and it has to be a situation with other people around where i can't keep on eating them. But i am scared it could be the thin end of the wedge. So anyway no sweets and i really like it like that.

No special exercise though i do things like take the dog for a walk sometimes (its not my dog so its not my responsibility to take it daily. But it is this week so i enjoy doing it then. ) and i work in the garden when i can motivate myself.

I take antidepressants and my diet feels like its at risk when i get stressed about things so i am trying very hard to get stress under control asap. I try to deal with problems sooner in some way. Often just finding someone (a counsellor) to talk through them with helps a great deal to alleviate stress and pressure.

But i self talk a lot about my commitment to my diet. I find that really helps me keep on track.

To get started i found self disgust with my weight was a motivator but i was already in a fairly good mood. YOu may not be and might need to sort out your mood first. Though of course deciding to start a diet can fairly quickly lift a mood sometimes.

But i know it can be difficult. When i am fat, just like you i think about it all a lot before i am actually able to switch into action mode and start a diet properly.

to help you switch into that mode, you can try doing things that will lift your mood and set your motivation more effectively like say going to see a dietician, or starting a yoga class or some other positive helpful thing. See a counsellor. Or start a volunteer job an afternoon a week. Anything that might lift your mood and make you feel more optimistic and positive. Just keep looking for possibilities.

Who knows even reading some of the goal achieved threads on here might help you. Just keep trying to find some way to lift your mood and kick start your motivation and stay right away from sweets.

Be kind to yourself but don't indulge in food things as a reward. Get plenty of sleep.

Keep trying.

Pattience
03-19-2014, 08:08 AM
Oh someone mentioned jump starting. It reminded me that i did a one day fast very near the beginning of my diet. It was hard. I wouldn't do it for any longer than that i wouldn't do anything like a 15 day fad diet thingy. Such a diet would take a lot of resolve.

My idea about one day fasts was that i would do them from time to time but i haven't actually felt the need to do any more since. A second part about doing one was that i thought it might help me practice restraint. But i would be tempting fate by having a treat twice a week. To my mind that is like cutting down cigarettes. That approach works for very few people. I"mi a cold turkey kind of person. I did ith with cigarettes 17 years ago and am doing sweets like that now.

I don't have a problem with other carbs though. Just eat more vegies with your carbs and less fat cause mostly i think why people eat so much of things like bread and pasta is because of all the goo that goes on top of it. Its not actually the pasta itself that's the problem. But that's my view and i know a lot of people here don't agree with me.

I mean truly, i've never been able to eat more than one bowl of 125grams of dry spaghetti. I never have a feeling of wanting more. Of course if the serve size was half that i would have to go back for more. Now mostly though i try to eat 100grams only of spaghetti and i do find spaghetti better than other pastas for some reason. I don't know if they are different.

Tell me try this and let me know if you feel you need to make another serving:

125grams spaghetti (usually 1/4 packet of 500g so not necessary to weigh.
1/2 metric cup of tomato pasta sauce from a jar - better quality the better
some chopped mushrooms sautéed separately in a 1tsp olive oil first up and if you like some zucchinis also or red pepper or some other veggie.
When the vegies are done, add in the sauce, heat through then add in the cooked spaghetti to get it hot again.
top off with 1 tbsp of finely grated fresh parmesan cheese and ground black pepper.

Let me know if you feel the need of a second serve after that.

I find nothing unhealthy or wrong with this meal. And it keeps me going a long time.

samcrokitty
03-19-2014, 08:40 AM
A couple of years ago I started a weight loss journey. I was dedicated and no one was going to stop me from achieving my goals!!! I did an amazing job (lost 80 lbs). I ate healthy, worked out nearly everyday, and I felt pretty darn awesome :) Then I tore my ACL. My activity has been very limited since last October. At first I was slowly gaining weight here and there. Then it began to PILE back on (gained back 50). The more weight I gain the more depressed I get and the more I eat. I am not able to work right now due to my slow recovery. I continue to make excuses as to why I can't lose weight, but the truth is I am not loosing weight because I am not eating right. Whether or not I can move is not the determining factor for losing weight. I am addicted to food, and I just can't seem to escape the hold it has over me. HELP please. I need an intervention. BTW my ticker is way off...

It's good you are seeing this and wanting to so something about it this soon. I have a similar story. Back in 2008 I started my first ever diet and lost 72 pounds. I was so proud and felt great. One day I twisted wrong and dislocated my knee and was in pain for weeks. I stopped my daily walking/biking and the pounds started to creep up. Then pretty soon I was back to my old ways of eating. After almost a year I gained every pound back plus 8 more. I was so disappointed with myself. It took me until this year to get my mind together again and start over. I've lost 29 pounds since the beginning of this year and I'm back to my old self mentally with my diet. I did have to force myself to make the change for the first 2 weeks though. But I just keep certain goals in my head when I feel my mind slipping. I think about summer coming up and having to squeeze into a bathing suit again, I think about wanting to do more activities while on vacation, etc. I was feeling real crappy one day in particular and saw Target putting out swimsuits and my head got together REAL quick! Just find things that work for you that you will look forward to and just take it day by day. That has helped me alot.

LucyRic
03-19-2014, 12:11 PM
lucky, thanks so much for posting exactly how I feel. I was on a roll, having lost around 90 pounds and totally committed to a new lifestyle.

I've gained 15 pounds in the past 6 or so months, and I don't think I even realized it was that much until I thought about it just now. And the scale number just keeps going up...

I'm actually a little jealous because at least you have a good excuse for regaining! But you're right, making excuses doesn't help.

I totally believe that we are both capable of escaping the hold that food has over us. But I'm right there with you in not knowing how to really start getting back on track.

lin43
03-19-2014, 05:35 PM
I know that oftentimes we're discouraged from starting something that we don't intend to continue "for the rest of our lives," but sometimes I think that standard is just too intimidating. I would often not start on an eating plan because I didn't want to face the "rest of my life" thought of eating that way. What finally worked for me was doing something radical that I knew I would not continue for the rest of my life, but that I knew I would use to get a few pounds off and get me motivated: the 17-day diet (the book is on Amazon & the reviews are great: go read some of them). I didn't even finish the first 17 days, but the plan had a limited food plan, and that was a relief to me. I never had to negotiate with myself about whether I could eat something: I knew that I could only eat what was on the plan. I'm sure I lost at least 5 lbs the first week (I didn't weigh, but my pants became looser), and that motivated me a week later or so to switch into calorie counting. That was June 2011. I lost all the weight I needed to within a few months, and I've been maintaining ever since.

The take-away from this: Perhaps you should try something you've never tried before, something that doesn't even give you the option of eating all those foods that you cannot handle in your diet right now. No need to think that you're eliminating them forever. You just need a jump start for now.

Good luck!

lucky216
03-20-2014, 12:03 AM
Thank you everyone for your fantastic input. I had a good day today. I plan on having another tomorrow and to continue on the path of self control and healthier eating habits. I agree that I have turned the idea of loosing weight into some big scary goal instead of taking it one bite at a time. I will succeed. That's not to say that I won't slip up on occasion, but I won't let my mistakes determine the rest of my journey. Thank you all for reminding me what I need to do and how to get it done!!!

Pattience
03-20-2014, 04:13 AM
Good post lin.

Actually i just want to add something to what she says. When i start a diet, i only have a few points to my plan. the first few weeks are less strict than what follows but only less strict on non trigger foods.

Usually i find my thoughts about my diet come to the fore as i go on.

Certainly now i start out with the idea of no sweets because i know that's going to work for me. But the idea of eating this way for the rest of my life came a bit later. So my diet evolved into a diet that i think i can do for the rest of my life. Whereas i think if i were to start out on a diet is so far different from what i could eat for the rest of my life, then bridging that gap might not happen.

On the other hand, who knows what gaps people can bridge. But i think going from low carb to carbs as recommended by the mainstream would be very difficult. It would be interesting to hear from anyone who's done it.

For me its just incredible how much havoc sweets play in my life. There have been times i have factored them in to a diet but i just haven't been able to make the diet last. Somehow, i begin to get obsessed by the delicious sweets and it doesn't matter if i am not hungry, i still want the sweets.

one idea i had before starting this present diet was if you are going to have dessert (home cooked variety) with dinner, have it first!

The reason that would work for me at all, is because there is another course coming and the savoury food takes away my desire for more sweets. If i have the sweets second, i will want more.

When i was in France last year i went to a fancy restaurant and had a five course meal. I wa completely stuffed about half way through but nothing was going to stop me getting to those sweets. And i don't regret eating them because they were delicious. But i do regret eating that stupid truffle omelette that came in the second course and the poor excuse for carrot soup that started the whole meal off.

The rest of the meal was totally delicious.

Actually when i was in France, i made a deliberate decision to eat meat (which i generally avoid) and not to restrict my sweets so long as they were not the sort of thing we can buy in the supermarket at home.) I enjoyed the most delicious patisserie nearly every day. And because i was on a cycling journey, i still lost some weight. If i lived in France, i would find it difficult to live without sweets for a while. But all the cakes and sweets in my country (except in the big cities) are really poor quality, unless in a restaurant. I don't want to waste my eating calorie allowance on poor quality foods anymore.

I want eating to pleasurable AND without regret. So that's why most of the time i make my own food.

diamondgeog
03-20-2014, 01:41 PM
I've heard a lot of doctors say that their patients do a lot better on low carb than weight watchers. People freak about low carbs and I was the LAST person on the planet who thought he could give up carbs and sweets. They were my staples.

But it was important and I did. It got rapidly easier for me. Here is the thing. For most people without the insulin spikes of sugar/carbs their appetite is naturally controlled. Especially if they are uping the fat. Fat is so filling.

My appetite is under control like NEVER before. It is awesome beyond anything I could have imagined. If anyone doesn't want to try low carb high fat, no problem, find what works. But I've cut out most all non-veggie carbs, I still have dairy but not too much yoghourt. I have cut out grains because it makes my body and mind feel so great.

But I eat as much butter, coconut oil, meat, eggs, veggies as I want. But what I want is much less than before...because no insulin spikes and no addicting grains.

No one on the planet can know they can't give up grains/starchy veggies until they try. I would have bet a million dollars against my being able to. It might not work for anyone else. But it might. No way to know until it is tried.

My takeaway from a year of research and a year of experience is this: on low carb high fat for a lot of people they are working with their body chemistry instead of fighting it. This leads to virtually effortless weight loss (well once you get past giving the things up in the first place) and success for a lot of people. Yes giving them up was hard, then it got a lot better quickly.

And so many people are doing this now there are almost endless recipes for grainless bread and grainless deserts now. They taste fantastic BTW.

VermontMom
03-20-2014, 06:31 PM
Thank you everyone for your fantastic input. I had a good day today. I plan on having another tomorrow and to continue on the path of self control and healthier eating habits. I agree that I have turned the idea of loosing weight into some big scary goal instead of taking it one bite at a time. I will succeed. That's not to say that I won't slip up on occasion, but I won't let my mistakes determine the rest of my journey. Thank you all for reminding me what I need to do and how to get it done!!!

Yay!! I've also had one day on plan yesterday, and although today isn't totally over yet, I hope to conclude it well. It is so easy to scare ourselves out of it with the thought of 'forever'..I do have to, myself, plan a little bit, but it truly comes down to one food decision at a time..minute by minute :p