Weight Loss Support - Addicted to diet sodas...




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Claygirl1518
03-12-2014, 10:33 PM
So, I love soda. Love it. Diet Pepsi max is my favorite, and people have told me multiple times that its so bad for me and it will make you gain ( or not lose weight). Any thoughts on this topic would be much appreciated. I drink usually at least 2 sodas a day, usually more... I prefer it over coffee. So, I guess the question is, how bad is soda for me, will it keep me from losing weight, and if you kicked your soda habit, how did you do it? What do you drink instead? Thanks!


kaybee1
03-12-2014, 10:40 PM
OMG I was ADDICTED to Diet Coke all through highschool/university like 3-5 cans a day at times. Jitters and anxiety if I didn't have one when I was craving one. Life was terrible lol. About two years ago I made the switch to Club Soda. I figure i'm more addicted to the carbonation (i find it extremely thirst quenching) and every once in a blue moon i'll have a diet coke and I actually don't even like it that much anymore. It takes effort but it's worth it. Ingesting all of that aspartame can't be good for you and it certainly aids in the whole unhealthy eating thing (what goes well with a Diet Coke? why, chips, of course!).

At first Club Soda was kind of gross to me, so I would do half orange juice/have CS and then moved to CS with a squeeze of lemon or lime, and no I just drink it straight up, i love it!

kaybee1
03-12-2014, 10:41 PM
I should also mention that I wasn't drinking coffee while I was drinking DC but now since my switch to CS and because my office has free coffee (the good kind) i've been drinking 1-2 cups a day, and someimtes I switch out my afternoon cup of joe for a cup of tea instead. I know caffeine isn't great for you either but one vice at a time!


Waterbunny77
03-12-2014, 10:50 PM
I'm also addicted. I love Diet Coke and drink a lot of it. It have never hindered my weight loss or caused me to crave real sugar. It may happen with some folks but not me. If I don't have any I will drink iced tea.

I try not to drink more than 2 20 ounce bottles a day but when I have a case of cans I can easily drink 5 cans in one day.

MauiKai
03-13-2014, 10:27 AM
Mark Hyman, MD
Practicing physician


How do you lose weight? Substitute diet drinks for sugary drinks. Eat low-fat foods. Just eat less of the bad foods -- it's all about the calories. We are told, "Just have more willpower."

These ideas are false. They are food and diet industry propaganda that make and keep us fat and sick. Lies by the food industry combined with bad government policy based on food industry lobbying are the major cause of our obesity and diabetes epidemic.

Now, more than 35 percent of Americans are obese, and almost 70 percent are overweight. This is not an accident but the result of careful marketing and money in politics.

We are told it is all about making better choices. If we all took more personal responsibility, we could stop this obesity and diabetes epidemic. We have been told there are no good or bad foods, that the key to weight loss is moderation. And, of course, if we all just exercised more, all of us would lose weight. These ideas hold us hostage.

What the Food and Diet Industry Doesn't Want You to Know

Diet Soda and Diet Drinks Make You Fat and Cause Type 2 Diabetes

Diet soda makes people fat? Really? How does that happen?

If losing weight were all about the calories, then consuming diet drinks would seem like a good idea. That's certainly what Coca-Cola wants us to believe in their new ad highlighting their efforts to fight obesity. They proudly promote the fact that they have 180 low- or no-calorie drinks and that they cut sugared drinks in schools by 90 percent.

Is that a good thing? In fact, it may be worse than having us all drink regular Coke (and the other food giants making diet drinks also push the same propaganda).

A new 14-year study of 66,118 women (supported by many other previous studies) found that the opposite seems to be true. Diet drinks may be worse than sugar-sweetened drinks, which are worse than fruit juices (but only fresh-squeezed fruit juices).

The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, discovered some frightening facts that should make us all swear off diet drinks and products.

Diet sodas raised the risk of diabetes more than sugar-sweetened sodas!
Women who drank one 12-ounce diet soda had a 33 percent increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, and women who drank one 20-ounce soda had a 66 percent increased risk.
Women who drank diet sodas drank twice as much as those who drank sugar-sweetened sodas because artificial sweeteners are more addictive and are hundreds to thousands of times sweeter than regular sugar.
The average diet soda drinker consumes three diet drinks a day.

You might say that people who are overweight and just about to get diabetes drink more diet soda, but they scientifically controlled for body weight. And they found the artificial sweeteners increased diabetes independent of body weight!

This and other research shows how diet sodas make people fat and sick.

And that diet drinks may be even worse than regular sugar-sweetened sodas! How does that happen?

Artificial sweeteners are hundreds to thousands of times sweeter than regular sugar, activating our genetically-programmed preference for sweet taste more than any other substance.
They trick your metabolism into thinking sugar is on its way. This causes your body to pump out insulin, the fat storage hormone, which lays down more belly fat.
It also confuses and slows your metabolism down, so you burn fewer calories every day.
It makes you hungrier and crave even more sugar and starchy carbs like bread and pasta.
In animal studies, the rats that consumed artificial sweeteners ate more, their metabolism slowed, and they put on 14 percent more body fat in just two weeks -- even eating fewer calories.
In population studies, there was a 200 percent increased risk of obesity in diet soda drinkers.


This is a link to the article the text above came from:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mark-hyman/diet-soda-health_b_2698494.html

Bellamack
03-13-2014, 11:24 AM
great article

I quit cold-turkey the first of the year. I have had 3 ( one serving) since. Some doctors contribute diet sodas, as well as regular sodas to osteoporosis. I have been drinking tea, hot as well as iced and mostly H2O. I don't feel any different, I only consumed one diet Pepsi per day. I don't drink coffee either, but love the smell of it.

Dollydimple
03-13-2014, 11:26 AM
I quite like coke zero. Didn't realize too much risks serious problems

Locke
03-13-2014, 11:33 AM
As someone who has been addicted to drugs and alcohol I find it funny when people say they are addicted to stuff like sugar or diet sodas. The jury is out on whether or not diet sodas are harmful for your body.

Keep in mind that there is research showing a correlation with drinking diet sodas and type II diabetes. A correlation, however, cannot show causation. It's more likely that people who are overweight and therefore more prone to diabetes are also more likely to drink diet sodas.

If you were drinking a twelve pack a day I would say that it's time to cut back. Two cans of diet pop a day? Doesn't sound too bad. Remember that animal studies showing that diet soda harms you usually feed the test animals an ungodly amount- say the equivalent of 50 cans of soda a day to "prove" that it causes cancer.

I don't drink diet soda every day but sometimes I will have one with my breakfast in the morning. Is it going to kill me? Probably not. There is a study out there to "prove" that anything you eat, drink, or come into contact with will cause cancer, heart disease, diabetes. Live your life and don't sweat the small stuff. That's how you get screwed up in the head and start restricting too much and bingeing- take it from someone who knows.

Psychic
03-13-2014, 11:38 AM
I drink maybe a can of diet soda a day, sometimes none at all. I used to drink 2-3, but I've cut back a lot. I do love Diet Dr. Pepper & Diet Cherry Dr. Pepper though.

MauiKai
03-13-2014, 11:43 AM
Keep in mind that there is research showing a correlation with drinking diet sodas and type II diabetes. A correlation, however, cannot show causation. It's more likely that people who are overweight and therefore more prone to diabetes are also more likely to drink diet sodas.


If you go back and read the article you will see they addressed that. It says "You might say that people who are overweight and just about to get diabetes drink more diet soda, but they scientifically controlled for body weight. And they found the artificial sweeteners increased diabetes independent of body weight!"

Locke
03-13-2014, 12:15 PM
If you go back and read the article you will see they addressed that. It says "You might say that people who are overweight and just about to get diabetes drink more diet soda, but they scientifically controlled for body weight. And they found the artificial sweeteners increased diabetes independent of body weight!"

There's also a legitimate concern called "healthy user bias" in epidemiological studies. Diet sodas have been marginalized nutritionally for decades. People who are actively trying to be healthy usually steer clear of them for that reason (whether or not that is actually true) so naturally people who drink the most diet sodas are also the ones who may smoke, do no exercise, and eat junk food. What I'm saying is that without knowing how diet sodas actually cause diabetes and with only evidence from epidemiological studies (which provide very tenuous evidence in nutrition science) it's not reasonable to stop drinking two diet sodas a day.

ReNew Me
03-13-2014, 02:25 PM
As someone who has been addicted to drugs and alcohol I find it funny when people say they are addicted to stuff like sugar or diet sodas. The jury is out on whether or not diet sodas are harmful for your body.As far as your brain is concerned, it's the same thing. Pleasure centers activated by vodka, cocaine, gambling, sex, sugar, tobacco, pain, doesn't matter.

And sugar can hit the brain just like cocaine, they've proven it:

Professor Joseph Schroeder and his students Jamie Honohan, Becca Markson, Gabriela Lopez and Katrina Bantis of Connecticut College in New London found rats formed an equally strong association between the pleasurable effects of eating Oreos and a specific environment as they did between cocaine or morphine and a specific environment.

They also found that eating cookies activated more neurons in the brain's "pleasure center" than exposure to drugs of abuse.

"Our research supports the theory that high-fat/high-sugar foods stimulate the brain in the same way that drugs do," Schroeder said in a statement. "It may explain why some people can't resist these foods despite the fact that they know they are bad for them."

http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2013/10/15/Oreos-just-as-addictive-as-cocaine-in-rats/UPI-76821381873121/

Addiction is addiction, an addict is an addict. Doesn't matter what the drug of choice is, it's how the brain responds to the drug. That's why addicts switch from one addiction to another. They haven't cured the problem, just shifted its focus. So it stands to reason if the brain perceives it's getting something sweet and it provides that surge of endorphins then it doesn't matter if the sweetness is actually sugar/fructose/sucrose or aspertame/saccharin/sucralose. Heck, people go from being addicted to drugs or alcohol to something healthy, like exercise, and then turn into gym junkies and start abusing their bodies that way, too. I personally believe eating disorders might fall into that category as well. People are very good at continuing to do things that reward their brains even if the behavior itself is destructive to their bodies.

abetterme
03-13-2014, 03:00 PM
Interesting article. I wasn't sure if diet soda contributed to weight gain or not. Long ago when I was trying to lose weight, I did drink 1 or 2 diet sodas a day and did lose. I really don't care for the stuff now. It just got harder for me to finish a soda after awhile and now I just don't drink it. Sometimes I crave the carbonation but I just opt for water usually.
I would just try to drink tons of water and limit it to one per day. You might actually stop craving it with all the water you're drinking instead.

Arctic Mama
03-13-2014, 03:00 PM
Oy vey - so much bad science in that article. Correlation does not equal causation, folks.

If you want to cut diet sodas for your health or comfort, go for it. But don't do so out of some belief that you're shooting yourself in the dietary foot by consuming them and that full sugar, other artificial sweeteners, or coffee are all more virtuous and health-sound choices than aspartame. They're *different*, and each has it's own trade offs.

As for me, I've managed to lose about 120 pounds with several daily servings of a variety of artificial sweeteners. I think I win, especially having gone from pre-diabetic to having an a1c of 4.7 ;)

Locke
03-13-2014, 03:21 PM
@Renew,

I'm not disagreeing with you that oreos cause a pleasure sensation in the brain, and that this can cause compulsive behavior. I disagree with the idea that eating an oreo produces the same amount of pleasure as a hit of cocaine. Oreos and cocaine are not in the same ballpark when it comes to addictive potential. They've done tests on animals and time after time it's been shown that animals will prefer drugs of addiction over food. A cocaine addicted chimpanzee will forgo everything- food, water, and the company of other chimps to get more cocaine.

You simply don't see people prostituting themselves in the streets to get one more oreo. Let's also not forget that drugs of abuse can cause horrendous withdrawals. Whether or not people can become addicted to oreos, they aren't going to die if they withdraw from them. People have died withdrawing from alcohol and heroine. So no, all addictions are not equal. You don't see overweight people shooting each other over a girl scout cookie deal gone bad. There's no support for your argument in the laboratory or in real life situations.

ReNew Me
03-13-2014, 03:29 PM
Oy vey - so much bad science in that article. Correlation does not equal causation, folks.Honestly that was just the first article that I could find regarding the subject. I don't feel like spending time trying to find articles to back it up, I've heard this before and other neurobiologists have documented the sugar/reward phenomenon.

Don't misunderstand me, I was addressing purely the concept that people can be addicted to just about anything, including sugar or diet sodas, NOTHING ELSE. That addictions to sugar or soda are just as real as addictions to heroine or alcohol. I personally think artificial sweeteners taste like poison and would rather go without any sweetener or will factor in the calories from a tablespoon or two of sugar into my days intake BUT I can have a little sugar and it doesn't affect me, I know other people cannot do that.

My husband and I are a good example of different addictions. He can smoke ONE cigarette, enjoy it, finish it, then not think about having another for ages. If I have ONE cigarette I am obsessing over having JUST ONE MORE constantly for weeks until I give in and go back to smoking (I've never managed to get past the craving, it turns into a constant itch in my brain). On the other hand he will plow through an entire 3 lb. bag of Hershey's miniatures in about a week if left to his own devices whereas I can actually forget I own the bag until I find it when I'm cleaning out the pantry a year later.

SMeeker71
03-13-2014, 04:05 PM
I wasn't addicted to diet soda, but I was addicted to Mountain Dew for most of my life. If you saw me, I had a Mountain Dew in my hand at all times. There would be days that Dew was all I would drink, and occasionally I would get tired of soda and have Sweet Tea.

My first attempt to break the soda addiction, I went to Root Beer and Cream Soda instead of Mountain Dew. But the sugar content was much higher in Root Beer. That attempt failed. More recently I just put the soda down all together and would drink Arizona Southern Style Sweet Tea, but that didn't last long. I then went to drinking water, and lots of it. Water not having any flavor was not quite doing it for me, so I started adding lemon to the water. Now, I don't miss the soda.

I ran out of bottled water at home the other day, and did drink a small amount of Coke, and I thought it was going to kill me. I won't make that mistake again. The flavor was good, but oh the heartburn it caused.

ReNew Me
03-13-2014, 04:59 PM
You simply don't see people prostituting themselves in the streets to get one more oreo. Let's also not forget that drugs of abuse can cause horrendous withdrawals. Whether or not people can become addicted to oreos, they aren't going to die if they withdraw from them. People have died withdrawing from alcohol and heroine. So no, all addictions are not equal. You don't see overweight people shooting each other over a girl scout cookie deal gone bad. There's no support for your argument in the laboratory or in real life situations.No, they don't prostitute themselves, they don't need to. Food is cheap compared to drugs, junk food even cheaper. You can spend $10 a day on Taco Bell's dollar menu and easily be hundreds of calories over maintenance.

If you watch the behavior of people who are food addicted when THEIR drug is off limits, they're not writhing in pain, but they're screaming, throwing tantrums, crying, begging, pleading and their body is screaming for food, just like a junkie's brain is telling them they're in pain when there isn't a thing wrong with them. When people get gastric bypass surgery and they're willing to send their body into shock by overeating repeatedly -- that's addiction.

Dismissing the pain of one person, saying THIS addiction is valid, THAT is a joke, is invalidating to the people who suffer from those problems. It's the same dismissive attitude that conventional doctors give to the person who is obese and asks what to do and the doctor says "Eat less, move more". Pain can't be compared, neither can willpower or discipline.

Locke
03-13-2014, 05:31 PM
@Renew

I wasn't dismissing their pain. Many people here (myself included) have struggled with food addiction. I said before that it is not a difference in kind but of degree. Addictions are habits that are reinforced via brain chemistry. I'm not saying that a person can't struggle from trying to cut back on diet soda or cookies. What I'm saying is this: stating that removing sugar from one's diet is the same as removing a daily morphine habit from a junkie's routine is not the same experience.

The biochemical processes involved are different for each, and in that sense it's not by degree- you will not start having seizures when you quit drinking diet sodas like some people do when they quit alcohol; this said yes the pleasure centers are also involved with both and they're the same except that cocaine stimulates the pleasure centers to a greater degree. The study you published indicated that there was a broader amount of neural activation in the case of sweets but this doesn't mean that sweets are more addictive, it just means that there was a wider range of activation, the meaning of which is open to interpretation.

TamTam
03-13-2014, 06:44 PM
I love Club Soda with lemon. It's carbonated so I still feel like I am having soda but without all the chemicals. I also put kiwi, strawberry, watermelon, or orange in it to give it flavor.

Radiojane
03-13-2014, 06:48 PM
There are umpteen threads on this topic, and they all spur heated debate. At the end of the day, NO, it's not that great for you. Just like a million other things. Will it affect your weight loss? Only you will know.

If you're looking for a slightly healthier option, or you find you just need the bubbles, look into a soda stream machine and carbonate the water and add berries or lemon.

Personally I had very bad experiences with diet soda, and it took me a lot of time to quit regular soda. My teeth and my gut and the scale have all thanked me.

nelie
03-13-2014, 07:14 PM
I've been missing the bubbly lately so I ventured into sparkling mineral water land. I remember the first time I had sparking mineral water while I was on vacation in europe and I was not a fan. Mostly because I was expecting regular water and I tried to drink it warm.

Now I'm a fan though especially with a little lemon or lime juice.

JohnP
03-13-2014, 07:22 PM
This type of thread is exactly why I post on this forum.

And that diet drinks may be even worse than regular sugar-sweetened sodas! How does that happen?

1) Artificial sweeteners are hundreds to thousands of times sweeter than regular sugar, activating our genetically-programmed preference for sweet taste more than any other substance.
2) They trick your metabolism into thinking sugar is on its way. This causes your body to pump out insulin, the fat storage hormone, which lays down more belly fat.
3) It also confuses and slows your metabolism down, so you burn fewer calories every day.
4) It makes you hungrier and crave even more sugar and starchy carbs like bread and pasta.
5) In animal studies, the rats that consumed artificial sweeteners ate more, their metabolism slowed, and they put on 14 percent more body fat in just two weeks -- even eating fewer calories.


1) Really? What about me? I'd sooooo much rather have a juicy steak than a candy bar. I guess I'm unique? Oh this statement is rediculous.

2) False. In some people there is a very small amount of insulin released. Total hyperbole here folks.

3) Haha this one is my favorite. I needed a good laugh.

4) In some people this is true in other the opposite is true. Out of all the points - this is the only reason in my opinion that people should avoid diet soda. If it triggers further cravings. For me and others it satisfies these cravings.

5) We are not rats.

I've looked at a lot of data and research in this area and the best study done in my opinion was in France still had a major problem. It relied on self reporting. People are terrible at self reporting.

In my opinion the correllation of diet soda to being obese is simply caused by people who think that drinking diet soda gives them more wiggle room than they think. Drank diet so I guess now I can have 4 cookies instead of 2. It's like the people who go to the gym and burn 450 calories in a workout and then have a bigger meal or extra desert because they earned it.

Arctic Mama
03-14-2014, 02:49 PM
Thanks John, I didn't have the time or energy to engage on this topic again. A quick forum search pulls up dozens of threads on the topic and I recommend reading through those for anyone who is interested.

nonameslob
03-14-2014, 05:25 PM
All I know is I finally determined that diet soda (and artificial sweeteners in general) gave me serious tummy troubles. Once I made that correlation, it was easy to kick the habit.

If you're drinking diet soda and you're losing weight, then what's the problem? I'm not saying it's good to drink a ton of diet soda. I'm not saying it's not addictive. Caffeine certainly is! But being overweight is a health problem, too. If you need to, tackle one thing at a time. Trying to "quit" soda while also trying to lose weight could cause a bigger problem. But, if you're struggling to lose weight, maybe it's worth trying to cut out the diet soda and see if it helps?

From what I've read, the science seems pretty murky. I personally made a decision to listen to my body (and my gut thanks me tremendously!), but your body might tell you something else.

Locke
03-14-2014, 05:36 PM
All I know is I finally determined that diet soda (and artificial sweeteners in general) gave me serious tummy troubles. Once I made that correlation, it was easy to kick the habit.

If you're drinking diet soda and you're losing weight, then what's the problem? I'm not saying it's good to drink a ton of diet soda. I'm not saying it's not addictive. Caffeine certainly is! But being overweight is a health problem, too. If you need to, tackle one thing at a time. Trying to "quit" soda while also trying to lose weight could cause a bigger problem. But, if you're struggling to lose weight, maybe it's worth trying to cut out the diet soda and see if it helps?

From what I've read, the science seems pretty murky. I personally made a decision to listen to my body (and my gut thanks me tremendously!), but your body might tell you something else.

Your approach makes a lot of sense to me. Every time I have dieted in the past I have tried to cut everything that I determined to be unhealthy out of my diet. It was too much change at once. Each person only has so much willpower.

Claygirl1518
03-14-2014, 06:48 PM
Wow. A lot of good information here. I love all the responses! As a psych major I agree, coorelation does not equal causation, but I think I will cut down to one soda a day anyway, just for me. At the very least, diet sodas do dehydrate you, and I'm already really bad about drinking water!

Serenity100
03-14-2014, 07:04 PM
I find that if I drink too much diet soda it has the opposite affect, it causes me to retain water. The other day I drank 2 cans of diet Pepsi in one afternoon for the caffeine, and I noticed that each 12 oz can had 35 g sodium. so that was 70 g sodium. All I know is that it too me two days to release all the extra water.

JohnP
03-14-2014, 07:57 PM
At the very least, diet sodas do dehydrate you, and I'm already really bad about drinking water!

This is not true. All soda that I am aware of is hydrating.

I find that if I drink too much diet soda it has the opposite affect, it causes me to retain water. The other day I drank 2 cans of diet Pepsi in one afternoon for the caffeine, and I noticed that each 12 oz can had 35 g sodium. so that was 70 g sodium. All I know is that it too me two days to release all the extra water.

With respect, unless you isolate all factors than you're just guessing. It's possible but stress is a much greater contributor to water retention than a small amount of added sodium in most people.

Arctic Mama
03-14-2014, 08:23 PM
Your approach makes a lot of sense to me. Every time I have dieted in the past I have tried to cut everything that I determined to be unhealthy out of my diet. It was too much change at once. Each person only has so much willpower.

That's why I keep diet soda. I'm whole foods, low carb, calorie counting, and controlled for excess protein as well. Artificial sweeteners in my coffee or the occasional low carb treat (like sugar free homemade icecream or almond flour cake) keeps me sane and on plan. Having a diet coke in the afternoon with some nuts and chocolate scratches a mental and physiological itch, too, while keeping me on plan. We all have trade offs and having done this for years, with many more to go, I've learned that there's enough real, physiological food issues I deal with that being overly picky on minor points isn't worth the mental energy.

Now, if caffeine or artificial sweeteners caused me health issues? That's a different ball game. But they're remarkably dietarily benign and don't bother my body, nor has compelling research shown that I'm worse off with a can of diet coke than the demonstrable harm my body undergoes from excess starch or sugar, which my crappy metabolism can't handle without insulin spikes, inflammation, and a subsequent spike in cravings. But my solution isn't suitable for every body - we each have to figure out what our bodies need and what trade offs we can live with.

Serenity100
03-14-2014, 08:32 PM
This is not true. All soda that I am aware of is hydrating.



With respect, unless you isolate all factors than you're just guessing. It's possible but stress is a much greater contributor to water retention than a small amount of added sodium in most people.
Not everything has to be scientific when dealing with one's own body. I know what I know.:D

freelancemomma
03-14-2014, 09:31 PM
Pleasure centers activated by vodka, cocaine, gambling, sex, sugar, tobacco, pain, doesn't matter.

Well, whenever I hear a statement like "research has shown that eating XX activates the same pleasure centres in the brain as cocaine," I think the statement is meaningless unless we know what ELSE activates (or doesn't activate) those pleasure centres. Maybe petting the dog or listening to soothing music or swimming in a warm ocean or having a great conversation with a friend also activates the pleasure centres. Does that mean all these activities are addictive, or just pleasurable?

F.

novangel
03-15-2014, 11:20 AM
I also would take prime rib over a huge piece of chocolate cake ANY day.

In the end I will always be against soda more so for what it does to your teeth than all the controversy about artificial sweeteners. That stuff never did anything for me anyway..perhaps because I have zero sweet cravings.

I'd say ditch it for your dental health more than weight concerns.

Radiojane
03-17-2014, 12:48 PM
Not everything has to be scientific when dealing with one's own body. I know what I know.:D

Very true. All the science in the world can't tell you how you will react to any specific thing.

circa83
03-19-2014, 09:48 PM
I was surprised at how easily I kicked my soda habit. I used to have at least 1 can or bottle of pepsi, dr. pepper, or cherry coke daily. I weened myself off of them by simply not buying them. This year I haven't really been wanting any. The fact that soda, diet or otherwise, is man-made and lacking in nutrition is enough to figure it's not beneficial even if our bodies can tolerate it. Since I heard that thirst is for water and hunger is for nutrients I haven't seen much point in drinking soda anymore.

moonkissed
03-25-2014, 04:13 PM
@Renew,

I'm not disagreeing with you that oreos cause a pleasure sensation in the brain, and that this can cause compulsive behavior. I disagree with the idea that eating an oreo produces the same amount of pleasure as a hit of cocaine. Oreos and cocaine are not in the same ballpark when it comes to addictive potential. They've done tests on animals and time after time it's been shown that animals will prefer drugs of addiction over food. A cocaine addicted chimpanzee will forgo everything- food, water, and the company of other chimps to get more cocaine.

You simply don't see people prostituting themselves in the streets to get one more oreo. Let's also not forget that drugs of abuse can cause horrendous withdrawals. Whether or not people can become addicted to oreos, they aren't going to die if they withdraw from them. People have died withdrawing from alcohol and heroine. So no, all addictions are not equal. You don't see overweight people shooting each other over a girl scout cookie deal gone bad. There's no support for your argument in the laboratory or in real life situations.

I think you are correct that not all addictions are the same. But perhaps instead of comparing it to hard drugs maybe see it similar to smoking or alcohol? I have never seen people shooting each other over getting a cigarette or beer either lol But they both can be real addictions.

Before I smoked I rarely drank pop. Afterward I quit I started drinking it alot! I remember quitting smoking and having withdrawls & the just complete suckitude of it lol And if I got without having a soda it can be a very similar feeling.


I love my diet dr pepper so much. The amount of calories I save from normal soda is insane. I am not quite sold on the articles that it is so bad but it surely is not good for me. It always kind of reminds me of the black sludge stuff from the movie ferngully. lol. And it is sooo bad for your teeth!

I am trying to cut back. Drinking more water is better. Slowly just weed myself down to a few a week would be much better.

RareandUnknown931319
03-25-2014, 04:25 PM
MauiKai is right, there is huge amounts of sugar and aspartame in diet sodas. Aspartame has the same effect as cigarettes with nicotine. So your basically drinking nicotine in a soda. I quit cold turkey too. I now drink water (alot) or Powerade, its calorie free, no aspartame, and it fills you up, also it is really good for you. Hope this helps you kick the heck out of the diet soda obsession.:)

Radiojane
03-25-2014, 04:28 PM
Please be very careful taking in too much of any electrolyte sport drink like powerade. Keep in mind that they're designed to rehydrate athletes after strenuous exercise and even low and no calorie versions can mess with homeostasis.

CherryPie99
03-25-2014, 04:50 PM
I was addicted to Mountain Dew - real, not diet. That (and all soda) is the ONLY thing that I have made completely off limits. I had my last soda in May of 2010. And do you know that of EVERYTHING that I've given up or changed it is my sweet lovely Mountain Dew that I miss terribly!

Jen

alaskanlaughter
03-25-2014, 06:41 PM
MauiKai is right, there is huge amounts of sugar and aspartame in diet sodas. Aspartame has the same effect as cigarettes with nicotine. So your basically drinking nicotine in a soda. I quit cold turkey too. I now drink water (alot) or Powerade, its calorie free, no aspartame, and it fills you up, also it is really good for you. Hope this helps you kick the heck out of the diet soda obsession.:)

Are there studies out there that back this up? I'm not so sure about that....

MauiKai
03-30-2014, 01:55 PM
http://www.rodalenews.com/facts-about-soda?cm_mmc=Facebook-_-Rodale-_-Health-_-EverytimeWeWriteAboutSodaWeWanttoDrinkItButDontDoY ouEverWantSomethingBadAfterReadingAboutIt

Locke
03-30-2014, 02:58 PM
A click through slideshow of pictures with very brief synopses of research (which aren't linked to the original studies) attached is not compelling evidence for an argument for or against drinking diet sodas.

MauiKai
03-30-2014, 03:17 PM
Depends on who you ask. The research is out there, if you go look for it.