South Beach Diet - Shirataki Noodles




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chubbybunny29
02-14-2014, 04:14 PM
These prove to me that I'd rather have WW pasta with way less frequency than have this substitute.

Ug, the texture is really weird!


vealcalf2000
02-14-2014, 04:26 PM
I've been wanting to try them. It seems like people either love them or hate them. I did find out my local Giant Eagle carries them. I just keep forgetting to get them. Sometimes I wonder though if I've found substitutes for pasta in the form of zucchini, green beans, cabbage, etc. do I need to have a noodle substitute? LOL people think I'm funny when I pour some low calorie meat sauce on my green beans or toss some cabbage in my eggs. They are just so darn filling!

chubbybunny29
02-14-2014, 05:40 PM
I think I want to get one of those gadgets that makes zucchini, etc into "noodles".

My advise if you're going to try it, try the thinner ones. I got the linguini shape/size and I think the thinner ones would have been easier to deal with.


yoyoma
02-14-2014, 07:33 PM
I bought some mail order a few years ago but I never got through them. Their texture is not noodle texture. If I could think of them as some other sort of exotic food, I might be able to enjoy them. I like all sorts of odd things... they kinda remind me of Chinese tree fungus or seaweed salad or a stiff agar texture-wise. But so far I have been unable to win the mind game.

RiverGirl
02-14-2014, 10:08 PM
I like these in a stir fry, but not in place of regular pasta (ie: spagetti & meatballs)

cottagebythesea
02-15-2014, 07:00 AM
I use shiritaki occasionally and really enjoy them in dishes that would otherwise call for pasta. A hint to make them more palatable is to rinse them well first, then lay them out on paper towels and pat them dry before using them. Yes, the texture is a lot different than than pasta noodles, but I think they make a good substitution.

Rocketgirl2011
02-15-2014, 09:03 AM
I bought a spiralizer over the Christmas holidays and I love it. Zucchini noodles are awesome, I'd not had pasta in a long while (wheat makes my tummy unhappy) and upon first bite it was bliss. I spiralizer a lot of veggies now, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, mimic a, cute....basically it's a great tool. Yummy.

EmmaD
02-15-2014, 04:09 PM
I am one of the few who actually really loves them! But it did take me a while...

There were a bunch of threads a couple/few years ago with lots of suggestions that help those who are on the fence about shrirataki-type noodles. Some of them have been mentioned already, but here they are:
First, always rinse them WELL. They have a funky smell out of the bag. Boiling helps! I either boil mine in water for a bit or cook them in sauce (this is the best method I think) after rinsing. Improves the texture a bit and removes the smell.
Sometimes I cut mine up so that the sauce can coat better and there isn't as much "bald" pasta.
I only use the spaghetti or angel hair versions - Linguine or anything wide just seems too weird.
When I have had leftovers, I found they were better the next day, so maybe they absorb the sauce more effectively after sitting.
Also - there are different kinds, some use tofu and some use yam flour I think... experiment. I buy whatever is on sale - currently Korean Wildwood "PastaSlim" (http://www.wildwoodfoods.com/products/pasta-alternatives/pasta-slim/long-noodles/spaghetti-0) noodles made with tofu.They are DEFINITELY not the texture of pasta. But for me an acceptable substitute. I love them with marinara sauce & veggie meatballs and with peanut sauce & broccoli.

***

I second the idea of zucchini noodles!! :love:
I do not have a spiralizer - really want one though - so I just use a shredder/peeler (like this one (http://www.prouditaliancook.com/tag/oxo-julienne-peeler)).

In fact, I have opted to use zucchini noodles instead of shirataki recently. Yum!

mars735
02-15-2014, 11:06 PM
I agree with EmmaD! They do grow on you. I actually like the spinach fettucine ones by Wildwood for some strange reason. I also noticed that the sooner i use them the less odor they have. But rinsing well totally takes care of it. Guess it's time to try zucchini noodles though, as much tofu is GMO.

Another noodle sub is tofu yuba which is a thin sheet of tofu that you cut into noodles or use as a wrap. It has a delicious nutty flavor.

jenne1017
02-17-2014, 03:17 PM
I use brown rice pasta in place of regular pasta. I don't care for the Shiratake noodles. I wanted to but they are too fishy tasting to me.

vealcalf2000
02-23-2014, 12:37 PM
LOL I found them at Walmart and actually like them a lot! Now here's what's funny, I had a head cold when I bought them so I didn't have to get over any strange smells prior to cooking and eating them! I did rinse them very well first, patted them dry, and used them in a stir fry with mushrooms, cabbage, chicken, and a light soy concoction I made up. Very tasty and very filling! It was nice to eat something different. I bought two more bags at the store the other day. It's nice to have some different options instead of just protein and steamed veges.

Beth19
02-24-2014, 08:26 PM
I found some at Walmart this weekend also and DH wanted to try them. So tonight I made them with marinara that had some LF sausage. I rinsed them, patted dry and then "dry fried" them in a saute pan. Both DH and I liked them enough to buy/eat them again and isn't that the ultimate test??

WaistingTime
03-01-2014, 01:03 PM
I tried Nosoyo Pasta Zero Plus today with Hungry Girl's alfredo recipe (http://www.hungry-girl.com/show/pasta-la-vista-fettuccine-hungry-girlfredo-recipe) (but I doubled the sauce). Honestly I tried not to smell the noodles before they were cooked/sauced and tried to pretend they were something else when I was eating them.

It worked! I could fool myself and consider this a doable option to pasta. And very low cal.

I'd like to try kelp noodles too but haven't found them yet.

plusmince
03-02-2014, 05:44 PM
I admit, I like them! I use them with a wedge or two of laughing cow cheese and tuna to make a cheaters tuna noodle casserole. But I also love to use spaghetti squash as a sub for pasta (and at least it has no smell)!

love2b150
03-02-2014, 06:08 PM
I use shiritaki occasionally and really enjoy them in dishes that would otherwise call for pasta. A hint to make them more palatable is to rinse them well first, then lay them out on paper towels and pat them dry before using them. Yes, the texture is a lot different than than pasta noodles, but I think they make a good substitution.


This is what I did because I had heard about their weird texture ... this also gets that fishy smell off of them. I enjoyed them as a spaghetti sub while the family was eating regular pasta.

Thanks for the heads up on the wider noodles. I will stick to the thin since they were a tad chewy :)

love2b150
03-02-2014, 06:18 PM
Emma do you have any of the Wildwood PastaSlim noodles on hand? if so, How long do they keep? I would have to travel a bit to get them and would prefer not to just buy one bag. Thanks. Also thanks for the reference to the Julienne peeler, never paid attention to such a thing unless it was a potato peeler :).

AwShucks
03-02-2014, 06:42 PM
I also recommend the spiral slicer for veggie noodles! I had one in my Amazon cart for a while, and it finally went down in price about $10, so I ordered it. I love it. I make fresh zucchini noodles (zoodles!), put some refrigerated homemade pasta sauce on them and zap it in the microwave about 3 minutes -- cooks the zoodles and warms the sauce. They're great! You can even swirl them on a fork just like pasta.

I like shirataki noodles, too. I found the best use for them in soups. I made a great chicken noodle soup with them and found that the noodles absorbed the flavor after having stored the soup in the fridge. Yes, do wash them before you cook them! It's very important!

EmmaD
03-03-2014, 05:45 PM
Emma do you have any of the Wildwood PastaSlim noodles on hand? if so, How long do they keep? I would have to travel a bit to get them and would prefer not to just buy one bag. Thanks. Also thanks for the reference to the Julienne peeler, never paid attention to such a thing unless it was a potato peeler :).

Funny you should ask - according to me they last forever. An exaggeration of course but I have used noodles six months beyond their expiration date. I was suspicious.... but I couldn't tell any difference in texture and the liquid didn't seem changed at all. Same mild fishy odor. The bags I have right now are all slightly expired - I got them at a closeout for $0.50/bag. I'm sure they would eventually spoil but nothing has ever happened to mine refrigerated over the span of a few months.

I love my julienne peeler! I just used it for zucchini today. I like that it makes flat thin noodles, like linguine. I want a spiralizer too.

CyndiM
03-03-2014, 06:05 PM
I also recommend the spiral slicer for veggie noodles! I had one in my Amazon cart for a while, and it finally went down in price about $10, so I ordered it. I love it.

I just found a website (http://www.inspiralized.com/2014/02/28/how-to-make-rice-from-vegetables-inspiralized-rice/#more-6511) with more ideas including butternut squash and turning butternut squash spirals into rice. I can't wait to try it!

miniapplecocoa
03-03-2014, 11:48 PM
Hi everyone, new girl here. I love shiritaki noodles. I just ordered a case of a new type with oat bran in them. I have not tasted them yet. But, I did discover with the regular noodles rinsing by swishing them in a big bowl of water about 5 times then dry frying them until they are bone dry(sometimes even a little browned) gives them a tamer texture. Also, You have to hide them well in the sauce. I have cut my portion to 1/2 of a bag. That way I get full and the texture does not get to me before I am done eating. They work great in place of rice noodle dishes. I'm pretty hard core with these now. I actually made scampi with the shrimp shaped ones. LOL! I use glucomannan powder to thicken sauces and smoothies too.