Weight and Resistance Training - Progressive weight lifting program to increase strength




neurodoc
01-26-2014, 09:11 PM
I started doing the Stronglifts program 5 weeks ago. The program has you lifting 3x/week. My problem is with one of the main principles of the program- that of increasing weight on all lifts (there are 5 different ones) by 5 pounds each time you do it, for 12 weeks. I don't think I can do this, or even remotely close, and would like to know how much is because I'm female (the program is written for men), and how much is other stuff, that I could do something about.

When I started, I could back squat 135 for 5 reps (just barely). After weeks of squatting lower weight than that (the program has you start with weight that is ~60% of your 5 rep max.), I'm finally up to 135, and it's all I can do to squat the weight for 5x5, with sub-par form. Same story with my other lifts- I am back to my initial 5RM but definitely pushing the envelope with 5x5 reps. There is NO WAY I can keep increasing the load by 5 pounds each training day for the next 7 weeks. So, what do you all recommend for getting stronger? Do I try increasing the weight less often? If so, how often? I could buy 1.25 lb plates and try to go up by 2.5 each time instead of 5? What is a realistic goal in terms of increasing the weight?

FYI:
1. I am not a newbie to lifting (18 months already), but decided to "get serious" about increasing strength instead of being satisfied with lifting the same weight month after month. So I definitely won't be getting any "newbie gains."
2. I am eating a few hundred calories under my supposed TDEE (which is ~1900-2300/day) so eating between 1600-1800 with min. 100 gm protein/day. But, I definitely haven't lost any weight, and don't think I've succeeded in any recomp because none of my measurements are any smaller - 5'2", 131ish, about 22% BF. Not sure how much this affects strength gains (I know it affects hypertrophy, but that's not my goal).


IanG
01-26-2014, 09:19 PM
Wow, that does sound unrealistic.

I am probably 10 months into weight lifting. I am probably lifting around twice the weight I started with now. But it did take time. I just kept lifting the same weight time and time again until it got easier and I could add five pounds. Typically I do 3 sets of 10 reps on each exercise. On the last set I sometimes add 5 pounds and see how many reps I can do. If I make it to 10, that becomes my new weight for that exercise.

What I will say was that building strength and muscle was very difficult when I was seriously limiting my calorie intake earlier on in my weight loss. I eat more now, but still maintain a small deficit, and have noticed much more rapid gains in how much I can lift.

Real bodybuilders eat a lot of calories and add fat as well as muscle to gain strength fast. They then go on a "cut" diet to get rid of the fat while trying to preserve muscle. My diet now is more of a "cut" type diet so my progress, while OK, is still slow compared to the guys that can bulk.

I am eating about the same calories as you by the way (with more protein as I am heavier) so your diet looks good for weight training. But, like me, you are probably edging on the cut side, not the bulk so gains will be slower. But the fat will be kept away.

Chardonnay
01-26-2014, 10:01 PM
I started weight lifting 26 years ago when I was 19. Even with my metabolism and energy back then, I couldn't increase weights 5lbs each training session. Did I get that right, they want you to say start with a 5lb dumbbell on day 1, then 10lb on day 2 etc...? I stopped exercising for 10+ years, but for the last 3 years, I've been pretty regularly training, and I've only been able to more than double my weight, but that's not on all body parts. I started with 5lb for biceps for example, then 8lbs, now I can do 10lbs...but it's easy now, 3 sets of 12 reps, so I will have to increase to 12lbs.

My legs are much stronger, so I increase those weights much more.

For my shoulders, which are much weaker due to old injuries, I can only now do 5lb shoulder flyes, 3 years later!! I started with 2lb weights.

That program does sound like it's built for men who are in awesome shape with already strong muscles. I keep thinking of Sylvester Stallone in Rocky...drinking down those dozen raw eggs in his blender, I think that program was meant for guys like him ;) But that's just my opinion!


Defining
01-27-2014, 12:31 AM
Aw man, so many fun topics this week! :D

I actually just read an article on progressive overloading two days ago, so I'll just direct you to it: http://bretcontreras.com/progressive-overload/

This is a decent intro/explanation on the subject, but I can give you the cliff-notes:

A) FORM FIRST! Never sacrifice safe movement for the sake of lifting more; you will eventually end up injuring yourself.

B) There are several different ways to create overload, apart from increasing the weight (eg. 1 extra rep each time, change rep tempo, resting for less time between sets, etc.).

I will also add that you should definitely schedule a deload week every 4-6 weeks when working with this kind of program - your body needs the break to repair itself properly.

And 5lb gains every lifting session isn't just unrealistic, it's downright dangerous. For men or women. Trained or new lifters (you're right, trained lifters progress even slower). The only exception to this would be on the 'big' lifts when you're first starting lifting (eg. squat, deadlift, overhead or bench press, etc.) - but even then, that level of constant increase has it's limits!

If I were you, I'd just ignore that number all together. ;) I remember reading somewhere that you should never increase the weight you're lifting more than 5% a session (and to repeat yourself for at least 3 sessions before adding more)....I'll try and find the article and pass it on, if I spot it.

Instead, find a way to push a little harder every session, without causing damage to yourself. I can absolutely respect your wanting to follow this program, but I will strongly urge you to do so safely.

Way to go on your progress thus far (can I say, wow!). I'd love to hear how things work out for you when you finish - if you enjoyed it, if it helped you get to your goals, etc. Best of luck, and have fun!:)

nelie
01-27-2014, 08:09 AM
I think with a lot of new lifters, especially women, they are timid with weights and do less than they can just because that is where they think they are at. I'm not sure if that is the reason Stronglifts recommends increasing 5 lbs each time or not. In your upper body, especially shoulders, this is quite difficult.

And the right answer is do what feels right, back off if you feel any pain and do keep pushing.

neurodoc
01-27-2014, 10:46 PM
Thank you. Especially for that link, Defining. That was really helpful. Made me realize I have been making some gains even though I didn't increase my max weight (because now I can lift those weights for 25 reps instead of just 5). I think I'll throw out the 5-pounds-per-session increases and aim for once a week, and then only when I can do the weight for all the reps with the same form as the prior one.

Moving Forward
01-27-2014, 11:16 PM
Great article Defining! Also, thanks for the question Neurodoc. I always wish there was more serious discussion on here amongst those of us doing strength training.

Defining
01-28-2014, 01:13 AM
Glad you guys enjoyed it - Bret Contreras is also a leading expert on glute development; he's the guy to reference if you want to develop a shapely backside.

I think the whole strength training and muscle science side of things is fascinating. And there are clearly a few of us around who are interested in it. Maybe we should start more threads about it?! :)

Moving Forward
01-28-2014, 01:40 AM
Yes Defining!

alaskanlaughter
01-29-2014, 01:11 AM
when i'm doing weights, I aim to do 3 sets of 10 reps each and I should be feeling it at the end of each set...when I can do those sets without really pushing it, I increase to 12 reps each and when that becomes easier, I increase the weights....I've found that I can increase weights on my arms very gradually, like 2.5 pounds at a time....I can increase weights on my abs, inner thighs and outer thighs about 5 pounds at a time, on my back by about 7.5 pounds at a time and on my legs, with the leg press, about 20 pounds at a time

for example on the leg press, I would do 1 set of 12 at 310, 330 and 350 each and then do 1 rep at 370....the next day, repeat and do 2 reps at 370...the next day do 3 reps at 370 and I did that and repeated some rep days until I could do 10 reps at 370 and that became the normal routine...and it's REALLY pushing it to do 10 reps at 370 and now i'm adding 3 reps at 390

katerina11
01-30-2014, 10:23 AM
SL5x5 is meant for beginners or those getting back in. I do know some intermediate lifters who use the template for one specific lift, but you might be better off with 531 or another periodization. 531 is basically a hybrid of periodization and linear. i have found it to be a good program, but it requires some patience.

neurodoc
01-30-2014, 09:44 PM
Ok Katerina, I'll bite: what the heck is periodization, and what's linear? I know virtually nothing about the theories behind strength training, only what I read in the New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women, which I finished about a year ago.

katerina11
01-31-2014, 10:24 AM
Ok Katerina, I'll bite: what the heck is periodization, and what's linear? I know virtually nothing about the theories behind strength training, only what I read in the New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women, which I finished about a year ago.

I am so sorry I didn't explain.

Linear progression is adding weight every session or every week, like SL5x5 and Starting Strength programs. They are intended for beginners who can recover and progress quickly.

Periodization is a type of programming where, over a period of weeks (usually a few months) you progress, but you do so by having a heavy day, a light day, a volume day, a speed day etc. Rather than working on just adding weights, you work strength in different ways in order to progress. For intermediate and advanced lifters this works best. There are different programs that utilize different ways of progressing, but they all have light days and heavy days and eventually you add weight, after a full cycle is complete in the program.

The 531 program by Jim Wendler is linear periodization, essentially. It has a monthly cycle, so the cycle is very short. It is 3 weeks of lifting at various percentages of your max followed by one deload week and then you progress to the next weights. 5 lb or 10 lb progression, usually.

Here is an article about 531
http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/how_to_build_pure_strength

and here is a great calculation page where you can pick which 531 template you want to follow. I recommend 531 for beginners. This way you can squat and bench twice a week. The accessory exercises are up to you, as by now you know your own weaknesses.
http://blackironbeast.com/5/3/1/calculator

If you want, I can input the calculations for you, and provide you with the first cycle here, as I know it can be confusing if you are looking at this for the first time. Just PM me your max lifts for OHP, bench, squat and deadlift, or put them here if you like.

neurodoc
01-31-2014, 10:38 PM
Gosh katerina, thank you. That's a lot of writing in answer to my question. Yes, I think I would do better with a non-directly linear system; it seems much more logical to me than the simplistic add-5-pounds-each-session system in SL.

I went to the Blackironbeast calculator, put in some guesses for my 1 RM and it gave me a 5 week program. Only problem is, none of the accessory exercises have weight listed, just # of reps. And, oh yes, there is no way I can do 10 completely unassisted pullups/chinups (I can do about 4). So do I just do as many as I can per set, or use an assist weight that gets me 10 reps (about 20 pounds)? There's also a zillion different options for the assistance template, none of which I understand. I guess this means I should probably buy the 5/3/1 book, but I don't think I have the time to read a long thing right now.

FWIW, I managed to increase the weight on my squat by 5 pounds today, but at the cost of straining my R gluteus medius (at least, I think that's what hurts). Pretty sure it's because I start pushing with the R leg before the left when I get tired. So, I think it's time for a deload :>(

katerina11
02-01-2014, 11:03 AM
i have strength discrepancies and almost always utilize my left leg out of the hole more than the right. i just started barbell lunges to correct that issue. i can't believe how weak i was/am when it comes to lunges! when i lunge with right leg, i can hardly do 65#.

i chose no assistance exercise template because i do my own and know what i need. i also don't like being completely locked down and prefer to go in to the gym with my basic lifts planned but assistance is how i feel that day.

if you want the assistance mapped out, you can go for "Boring But Big" or BBB. i utilized that last summer and it certainly packs a wallop. it is the main lift, but done at 50-60% of 1rm for 10x5 with a short break between sets. good for conditioning. not so good, if you are running a steep deficit! man, i have almost passed out before trying to do it while running a deficit. saw stars.

and i can not do a single pull up. oh the lols to be had when i try and even do a dead hang. my *** is too big for that currently.

katerina11
02-01-2014, 11:57 AM
i wanted to add a caveat. i am only interested in strength training. i have little to no interest in bodybuilding, so if your slant is more towards bodybuilding, i am probably the wrong person to listen to! i rarely do hypertrophy (those BBB sets are as close as i have ever gotten to hypertrophy) and really don't know jack about how to make the body look a certain way. i only know about strength training.

neurodoc
02-01-2014, 07:14 PM
Definitely not interested in bodybuilding, only strength. Having said that, my biggest goal (which I may never achieve) is to be as strong as I can at 18%ish bodyfat (currently around 22-23%). So, I'm supposedly eating at a deficit of ~300 cal/day. I say supposedly because I have yet to lose a single pound even though I'm logging weighing and measuring all my food.

Can you tell me what I'm supposed to do with the accessory lifts that have no weight listed on the blackironbeast site when I generate a program? Since it wants me to do those lifts (like dumbbell extensions) 5x10-15 times, I imagine it is a much smaller weight, but the site gives me no clue.

katerina11
02-01-2014, 07:41 PM
if you aren't familiar with your own working weights for a particular exercise, i would wing it, and find a weight that makes the last couple reps hard but not almost impossible. the 10-15 reps are in the hypertrophy range and you will feel a burn, which is normal for that range.

what a great goal!! do you think you'll see abs at 18%?

my goal is to get to the 165 weight class, diet down to just past that (155?) and start the bulk/cut cycles. i would love to get in the national top 20 for my weight class in powerlifting. i have years till my goal is in reach.

neurodoc
02-02-2014, 05:58 PM
Hmm "makes the last couple of reps hard but not almost impossible." Ok; I'll figure it out, though as I said, for body weight exercises (hanging straight leg raise and pullups/chinups primarily), I will have to lower the reps since I can't offload the weight :>)

Yeah, if I could get down to 18%, I would see great abs- I can see them already, just not very "clean."

Finally, I want to caution you against bulk/cut cycles. They work really well for people who've never been seriously overweight. When you are "reduced obese" (the term used for anyone who is maintaining a weight loss of > 40 lbs/20% body weight), your body's set point is very fragile, and even small calorie surpluses are typically translated into pure body fat, rather than muscle, no matter how hard you train. You are much better off pursuing a strategy of "recomp" once you are within 10 pounds of your ultimate goal weight: eating just under your total daily energy expenditure, as estimated by something like health-calc.com, while getting at least 1.2 gm protein/pound of lean body weight and continuing a 3-4 day/week lifting program to avoid losing muscle mass. That last 10 pounds of fat will come off super slow, to be replaced by muscle so your actual body weight won't change, just your BF%. For more details, see something like gokaleo.com or bodyrecomposition.com (caution: if you go to the latter site, ignore the ketogenic diet crap - that's really bad for you).

Defining
02-02-2014, 07:04 PM
18% bf is my goal for the end of the year as well; I have quite a bit further to go than you do though, Andrea. :) Erm, I don't mean to hijack your thread (I can start a new one, if you'd prefer), but I was wondering...

I'm curious, do you object to ketogenic approaches in general, or specifically Protein Sparing Modified Fasts (PSMF)? Ketogenic diets are regularly used as an alternative treatment for epilepsy, and I thought that PSMF methods can also be followed under medical supervision for short periods of time with little to no long-term detrimental side affects. As long as patients also address their lifestyle/habits/emotional approach to food, I've always believed that ketogenic diets have their 'time and place'. I'm sure we all read way too much on this kind of stuff ;); I'm curious which aspect of the approach you've found to be harmful. I think it's a really interesting conversation, and I so rarely have the chance to chat with people who are actually interested! :)

----------------------------------------------

Katerina, it sounds like you've found a great love for strength training - I'm kind of jealous! :D neurodoc (Andrea) makes a good point about bulk/cut cycles: adipocyte hyperplasia (ie. your body making extra fat cells) means that most people who have been overweight in the past can gain weight faster in the future, and easier than if you've always been lean. It looks like you're already a reader of the t-nation stuff, but I'll point out a few articles I've enjoyed reading in the past regarding the bulk/cut phases:

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/get_big_without_getting_fat

www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/the_truth_about_bulking

I know that some people also enjoy using carb/calorie cycling as a compromise between the two cycles, so that you're never doing either for an extended period of time; might be something else fun to look at.

I always kind of think of 'bulk' phases almost like pregnancy (bear with me ;)); common recommendations for pregnant women are to increase daily intake by 300kcal a day for the second and third trimesters, and to ensure the nutritional density of their food (also ideally getting most of their kcal from whole foods). Many women kinda go overboard with that though, considering that you can get an extra 300-500kcal by eating a banana and having a glass of milk! :) Sometimes, a little goes a long way (or so I've read ;)).

I'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination on the subject; but I'm sure that if you do your research and continue to make healthy choices for your fitness goals (as it sounds like you are doing already!), you'll reach your goal. Best of luck!

EDIT: Just found this nifty article, geared more towards powerlifting. :) http://articles.elitefts.com/nutrition/bulk-cut-bloat-the-basic-science-of-weight-manipulation-and-powerlifting/

katerina11
02-03-2014, 12:09 AM
Hmm "makes the last couple of reps hard but not almost impossible." Ok; I'll figure it out, though as I said, for body weight exercises (hanging straight leg raise and pullups/chinups primarily), I will have to lower the reps since I can't offload the weight :>)

Yeah, if I could get down to 18%, I would see great abs- I can see them already, just not very "clean."

Finally, I want to caution you against bulk/cut cycles. They work really well for people who've never been seriously overweight. When you are "reduced obese" (the term used for anyone who is maintaining a weight loss of > 40 lbs/20% body weight), your body's set point is very fragile, and even small calorie surpluses are typically translated into pure body fat, rather than muscle, no matter how hard you train. You are much better off pursuing a strategy of "recomp" once you are within 10 pounds of your ultimate goal weight: eating just under your total daily energy expenditure, as estimated by something like health-calc.com, while getting at least 1.2 gm protein/pound of lean body weight and continuing a 3-4 day/week lifting program to avoid losing muscle mass. That last 10 pounds of fat will come off super slow, to be replaced by muscle so your actual body weight won't change, just your BF%. For more details, see something like gokaleo.com or bodyrecomposition.com (caution: if you go to the latter site, ignore the ketogenic diet crap - that's really bad for you).


i never thought about that. yeah, i will have lost approx 140 lbs, so i am definitely in that category.

i've read some stuff from body recomp, but never paid attention to much more than the RFL/PSMF info. thank you!

katerina11
02-03-2014, 12:16 AM
Katerina, it sounds like you've found a great love for strength training - I'm kind of jealous! :D neurodoc (Andrea) makes a good point about bulk/cut cycles: adipocyte hyperplasia (ie. your body making extra fat cells) means that most people who have been overweight in the past can gain weight faster in the future, and easier than if you've always been lean. It looks like you're already a reader of the t-nation stuff, but I'll point out a few articles I've enjoyed reading in the past regarding the bulk/cut phases:

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/get_big_without_getting_fat

www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/the_truth_about_bulking

I know that some people also enjoy using carb/calorie cycling as a compromise between the two cycles, so that you're never doing either for an extended period of time; might be something else fun to look at.

I always kind of think of 'bulk' phases almost like pregnancy (bear with me ;)); common recommendations for pregnant women are to increase daily intake by 300kcal a day for the second and third trimesters, and to ensure the nutritional density of their food (also ideally getting most of their kcal from whole foods). Many women kinda go overboard with that though, considering that you can get an extra 300-500kcal by eating a banana and having a glass of milk! :) Sometimes, a little goes a long way (or so I've read ;)).

I'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination on the subject; but I'm sure that if you do your research and continue to make healthy choices for your fitness goals (as it sounds like you are doing already!), you'll reach your goal. Best of luck!

EDIT: Just found this nifty article, geared more towards powerlifting. :) http://articles.elitefts.com/nutrition/bulk-cut-bloat-the-basic-science-of-weight-manipulation-and-powerlifting/

thank you for all of this! :)

i am going to give this info to the person who has been helping me in this last leg of weight loss, so he can read up, too.

he did recommend that i only eat 200 cals above tdee when i finally do bulk, and do a 9 month slow bulk/2 - 3 month PSMF and really only gain 8 to 10 pounds or so, each year.


i also want to know what neurodoc thinks about the PSMF/RFL. i have utilized it for short periods (two to three weeks) with good success. i don't know how effective a tool it would be for me for longer periods.

Mad Donnelly
02-03-2014, 03:12 AM
I think with a lot of new lifters, especially women, they are timid with weights and do less than they can just because that is where they think they are at

Yep, that's me.

I want to lift with the boys. Well, the men, I guess. I'm not a girl.

I really don't care about being the only woman, but it's going to take awhile to feel comfortable as I am a total noob. But this is what I want to do (dead lifts, squats, "old school" kind of free weights). I think this is the best way to do it rather than all machines.

I'd really love it if I cold get some encouragement.

katerina11
02-03-2014, 10:31 AM
Yep, that's me.

I want to lift with the boys. Well, the men, I guess. I'm not a girl.

I really don't care about being the only woman, but it's going to take awhile to feel comfortable as I am a total noob. But this is what I want to do (dead lifts, squats, "old school" kind of free weights). I think this is the best way to do it rather than all machines.

I'd really love it if I cold get some encouragement.

if there is any way i can help, i am so on it! i am still intimidated just about every time i go in. it's just my personality and it makes it harder being a woman who is still fairly fat. that nervous feeling may never go away each time i walk in, but i always regroup and focus on the iron. it helps to have a plan when you walk in, too.

have you ever done a barbell squat or a deadlift? i have found some great form videos along the way, if you need them. it also has helped me a great deal to video myself doing the different lifts and getting form critique by posting them online for feedback from some trusted sources. and eventually, i got good at spotting my own mistakes, so i still video even if i dont upload.

i am so excited for you! putting a barbell in my hands and on my back is one of the most empowering things i have ever done.

Mad Donnelly
02-03-2014, 04:48 PM
i am so excited for you! putting a barbell in my hands and on my back is one of the most empowering things i have ever done
So I didn't get a chance to actually do it today, but I did explain at my gym today what I was after. So sometime this week when there's a good time, I'll just grab one of the trainers and get them to walk me through more closely THAT area of the gym. Wasn't sure if they would want me to make an appointment or sign up and pay for an actual session but they didn't. Suits me fine as I sort of prefer to be "on my own" anyway and not dependent on appointment or class times.

katerina11
02-03-2014, 05:10 PM
So I didn't get a chance to actually do it today, but I did explain at my gym today what I was after. So sometime this week when there's a good time, I'll just grab one of the trainers and get them to walk me through more closely THAT area of the gym. Wasn't sure if they would want me to make an appointment or sign up and pay for an actual session but they didn't. Suits me fine as I sort of prefer to be "on my own" anyway and not dependent on appointment or class times.

yay!! :carrot:

Mad Donnelly
02-03-2014, 05:20 PM
yay!! :carrot:

I know. I'm pretty excited just from asking the question.


That and I got to put a new number in <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< over there.

CherryPie99
02-03-2014, 05:49 PM
Quick question - how are you guys measuring your body fat?

Defining
02-03-2014, 06:23 PM
Oh geez, there are loads of different ways; I track by myself with calipers, and then do a 'check up' with a bod pod once every 6 months (ish).

neurodoc
02-04-2014, 12:09 AM
18% bf is my goal for the end of the year as well; I have quite a bit further to go than you do though, Andrea. :) Erm, I don't mean to hijack your thread (I can start a new one, if you'd prefer), but I was wondering...

I'm curious, do you object to ketogenic approaches in general, or specifically Protein Sparing Modified Fasts (PSMF)? Ketogenic diets are regularly used as an alternative treatment for epilepsy, and I thought that PSMF methods can also be followed under medical supervision for short periods of time with little to no long-term detrimental side affects. As long as patients also address their lifestyle/habits/emotional approach to food, I've always believed that ketogenic diets have their 'time and place'. I'm sure we all read way too much on this kind of stuff ;); I'm curious which aspect of the approach you've found to be harmful. I think it's a really interesting conversation, and I so rarely have the chance to chat with people who are actually interested! :)
----------------------------------------------


No worries about "hijacking," you're very welcome to move the conversation in multiple directions; I don't mind at all.

I object not to ANY use of a ketogenic diet, just the relatively long-term use of that approach for weight loss. You're right, a ketogenic diet is used, more-or-less safely under close medical supervision, for long periods of time with children who have severe epilepsy. But they have a terrible, devastating, brain-damaging disease and the alternative to the diet is having up to 50 seizures a day. Losing weight to look good in a bathing suit is not a really good reason to risk multi-system organ failure, which ketogenic diets can cause.

In broader terms, as a physician, I am opposed to the use of any diet that eliminates entire categories of food from routine consumption. Our bodies require all 3 macronutrients in reasonable quantities to function optimally (and Paleo fetishists aside, even eskimos feast on a sh*t-ton of carbs during their summer season). Although as omnivores, we can survive - and thrive- on virtually anything digestible that can be turned into calories and glucose, a diet severely lacking in any one of the 3 macros will leave you feeling sick, weak and tired. And I also believe the data that shows that you can systematically downregulate your metabolism and your NEAT (non-exercise activity thermogenesis) by chronically eating more than 500 cals below TDEE. So, calorie cycling, IMHO is good, and eating an all-3-macros diet is good, and generally not aiming for huge calorie deficits + doing resistance exercise to build and keep muscle mass is the way to avoid the curse of the sluggish metabolism in the long run.

Defining
02-04-2014, 01:37 AM
Wow, I only just realized that 'neurodoc' was a more literal username. :o That's kinda awesome. Thanks for being open to new discussions; now that I'm aware that you're a neurologist, I'm almost tempted to start asking a whole bunch of questions on that as well! ;)

I'll admit, I'm surprised at the statement that ketogenic diets can lead to organ failure. The only potential side effect I've ever heard claimed for long-term ketosis is in regards to kidney failure due to higher protein consumption; and I was under the impression that it's now been proven that high-protein diets don't actually cause kidney damage. Obviously, I'm not a health professional and I don't follow all the most recent publications; I'm always happy to learn new information! :) Here are links to a few of the reading materials I found, while researching the topic:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/31/health/31really.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2716748/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100216163531.htm

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/2/1/25

On a personal level, I absolutely agree that a balanced diet is more desirable, but for me that's more in a social/economic application, and because I really enjoy a variety of tasty foods (I don't know enough to comment on the physiological side of things :p). I'm glad you also mentioned the adaptive reduction in thermogenesis; I was reading in another thread several posters saying that 'starvation mode is a myth'. While I don't exactly disagree about 'starvation mode' per se (I think that term is ridiculous, personally), there are definitely hormonal/metabolic changes that occur during weight loss and calorie restriction that maybe some people don't credit/realise. Hrmmm, almost tempted to go back and post something there now...

Thanks so much for your response, Andrea - I really appreciate hearing new points of view! :D (especially when voiced by informed individuals)

JerseyPAGirl
02-12-2014, 09:18 AM
Congrats on weight training :) Yeah, I think adding that much weight too quickly - whether it's a man or woman is not realistic.

Good rule of thumb....add weight (2-5 lbs) for any exercise that you can do with good form and the last couple of reps are challenging. :)