General chatter - There is something wrong with my cats eye! Help!




imabehot
01-22-2014, 09:03 PM
Theres this white string hanging from my grey tabby cats eye. And on the part attached to his eye is a pink fleshy thing. IM FREAKING OUTA! Help??? :(


nationalparker
01-22-2014, 10:24 PM
Call your VET - don't come here for medical advice - human or animal. It could be something minor like eye goop b/c of allergies or something more serious.

imabehot
01-22-2014, 10:46 PM
Call your VET - don't come here for medical advice - human or animal. It could be something minor like eye goop b/c of allergies or something more serious.

I'm not looking for medical advice okay I'm looking for suggestions on what it could from those that share the experience.


imabehot
01-22-2014, 10:51 PM
We're going to do an eyewash and see what happens. We think it's a round worm. I didn't even know that could happen.... but I saw it move so... I'm so worried about my baby. :(

imabehot
01-22-2014, 11:12 PM
okay the eyewash failed. And it is not a worm. It is however ATTACHED to his eye. I'm so scared for him. :(

alaskanlaughter
01-23-2014, 01:28 AM
if it's not coming off his eye with a gentle wash, take him for medical care because he could be seriously injured by trying to forcefully take it off his eye....is it bothering him? does he paw at it etc?

ReillyJ
01-23-2014, 02:30 AM
Take him to Emergency, better safe than sorry!!

Psychic
01-23-2014, 09:21 AM
Sounds like some sort of worm or parasite. Take your kitty to the vet and get it checked out.

imabehot
01-24-2014, 02:52 PM
Okay we pinched it to see if he felt anything... NOTHING. So we trimmed it just a little as adviced by a friend- i forgot why she said to do it i think she said it would work its way out. And I looked today and it's gone! And he's opening the eye all the way! Weird.

Skittlez
01-26-2014, 01:25 PM
It is never a good thing to self-operate on your pets, especially when you don't know what you are doing or what you are dealing with.

imabehot
01-26-2014, 04:03 PM
It is never a good thing to self-operate on your pets, especially when you don't know what you are doing or what you are dealing with.

Excuse me but it wasn't part of him. We made sure of that. And so we trimmed it and it fell out and he's all better and very happy. It was probably just string.

amandie
01-31-2014, 06:57 PM
Omg, I would have never done that. You're lucky...

Just for future reference (http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/general-chatter/111631-so-i-have-problem-need-advice.html) when you make threads like this.

kaplods
03-15-2014, 05:26 PM
Hubby and I have a cat and a pet rat. Because of our financial situations, we've had to learn to do some medical care for our animals that should normally be done by a vet. It sucks, but you do what you have to do.


Excuse me but it wasn't part of him. We made sure of that. And so we trimmed it and it fell out and he's all better and very happy. It was probably just string.

If the string-like thing had been part of him, I'd be less concerned.
It probably was not a string. Strings do not randomly attach to eyeballs with fleshy things attached.

It probably was a parasitic worm of some kind. Clipping it may have killed the worm, causing it to release.

If your cat is very lucky, one worm egg got in and grew in his eye and it was a single parasite that attached itself from the outside, and the problem is resolved.

I wouldn't count on luck though, because there are many parasitic worms that are deadly before you see any signs of them (such as heartworms, which I believe can infest the eye).

At the very least, keep a very close eye on your cat. Check his sleeping areas, his poop (squash the poop and look through it), eyes, nose mouth, genitals and rectum several times a day, for signs of worms. Even if there are none, there are no guarantees that he is now parasite free.

Whether or not there are signs of more, he could be dangerously infected. If you can afford a vet visit, I would highly recommend it.

You may be tempted to buy an over-the-counter worming medicine, but I would not recommend it, because you don't know what kind of worm you're dealing with. Also killing off the worms can actually be dangerous, if the infestation is severe (for example with heartworms).


As I said, I understand the reluctance to get veterinary care, but if you're not going to use a vet, you need to self-educate so that you can diagnose and treat your animals and and know the limits of your abilities, before the situations occur.

At the very least, I would recommend that you get a very good comprehensive book on healthcare for cats. One geared towards breeders will give more medical care instructions than one geared towards pet owners. A textbook for vets would be even better, but you need to have a strong science background to understand veterinary texts.

I'm not judging you for self-treating, because I do give my animals treatment that should probably be done by vets, but I have a strong science background (with coursework in life sciences in college and graduate school) and self-educated myself.

You can self-educate too, but if you don't have a strong science background, this can take a while, so you have to do it before a problem crops up.

I just got done treating my rat with antibiotics and lancing a huge abscess under her chin that might be due to a bad tooth. If it is a bad tooth, she will need to go to a vet to have it pulled.

I bought the antibiotics (for cows) at a farm supply store and did the math to calculate the rat dosage (which I already had looked up in my rat husbandry book) and lanced the abscess once it came to a head.

I wouldn't expect the average person to know how or when to give the antibiotics, the correct dosage, or how to lance the abscess without doing injury, so I would tell anyone else to go to a vet.

I know I can't pull a tooth, so if the abscess comes back, I will either have to take my little Pea to the vet, or euthanize her humanely myself. I'm putting money aside so that I can afford to take her to the vet, because I'd rather not have to put her down.

I get not being able to take an animal to a vet, even for emergencies, but if that's the case, you need to self-educate so that you're prepared before the situations come up.

Getting help from the internet, when the problem is occurring is just not the best solution, because you won't have time or a clear enough head to judge good advice from bad.

And if you're going to seek help of any kind online, at least go to a species-specific website (a cat care website, not a weight loss site). You'll still get a lot of bad information and judgement, but you at least have a more reasonable hope that a veterinarian or experienced breeder or pet owner can answer your questions.

ReNew Me
03-16-2014, 02:48 PM
A little off topic but maybe helpful to someone. The vet CareCredit card allows you to pay off the bill over time with NO interest (usually six months). It's really easy to get -- my stepdaughter qualified when she was working part time at a minimum wage job. Not all vets accept it but if you go on the website you can find a vet near you who does.

EagleRiverDee
03-18-2014, 04:03 PM
I can't imagine freaking out and being so worried about my pet...and then not taking my pet to the vet ASAP.

ReNew Me
03-19-2014, 11:28 AM
I can't imagine freaking out and being so worried about my pet...and then not taking my pet to the vet ASAP.There could be a lot of reasons why someone can't get their animal to a vet. Financial is the most obvious, which is why I made the post about Care Credit. But the original post was from January and using myself as an example, I can't drive. If I had a vet emergency when it's way below freezing outside with snow and ice on the ground and no one available to give me a ride I would have to carry my cat in a carrier for a quarter mile just to get to public transportation, which would probably end up with me killing myself on ice or giving the cat pneumonia. A taxi for me would cost about $50 round trip, on top of the base $55 my vet charges for a visit.

And saying "if you can't afford to pay for vet care don't get pets". Plenty of people have jobs and money, then get pets, then get laid off and can't find work. Most shelters in my region have had to change their No Kill policy because the economy has created over crowding conditions.

kaplods
03-19-2014, 04:36 PM
Twelve years ago, I would never have imagined myself being unable to afford and access health care for myself, let alone for my pets.

I need a great deal of dental work badly, but medicare does not pay for any dental, and dental insurance is out of the question, so we scrimp and save to get done what we can. In the meantime, teeth that might have been saved with early treatment, will end up having to be pulled by the time we can get to them.

The doctor wants me on meds I can't take, because I can't afford them, even with my medicare prescription plan. Drug-cost assistance programs are only for people without any coverage, or for people with lower incomes than we have.

If we lived in a more expensive apartment, we'd be eligible for some programs (because rent/mortgage is factored in, but current medical expenses are not.

An ER cannot refuse a person care in an emergency for inability to pay, but there is no similar guarantee for pets. If you can't make payment, too bad, Fluffy dies, unless you can learn to do some of the medical care yourself.

With my rats over the years, I've discovered that it's often easier and safer to learn basic veterinary care myself than to find a knowledgeable vet. In most communities, vets don't see a lot tiny pets.

I actually considered euthanizing one pet rat myself, because I was having trouble finding a vet who would do it (and this was when money wasn't an issue for me). Every vet I called either wouldn't treat small animals or wouldn't see my rat immediately. The rat was unable to breathe, so was in a lot of distress (cancer). Finally, I found a local vet willing to help (a large animal, farm vet, ironically).

These experiences taught me that I had to self-educate for my own healthcare and that of my animals, but the time to do that is ideally before a crisis, not in the middle of one.

Most of us aren't prepared for crises though, because we're not taught to expect the unexpected. We take things like healthcare and veterinary care for granted until those safety nets are pulled out from under us.