Exercise! - Yeah! Exercise does NOT increase caloric intake




diamondgeog
01-21-2014, 10:27 AM
I've never been successful without changing my eating and exercising more. I have had my best success ever this stretch and even become a runner.

I don't feel hungry after runs and I did not find myself eating more when upping my exercise. Turns out I am not the only one. I am sure some do. But most don't.

Glad another 'myth' can bite the dust.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/21/exercise-eat-more_n_4618165.html?ref=topbar


EagleRiverDee
01-21-2014, 01:38 PM
I think it varies. Some people use exercise as an excuse to eat more, as a reward. In others, exercise, particularly high intensity exercise, actually acts as an appetite suppressant. I try to simply not count the calories I burn during exercise and stick to my normal eating. No food rewards for good behavior, those are for my dog. :)

diamondgeog
01-21-2014, 02:04 PM
You are talking behavior. I think there is a conception by some people that exercise increases appetite. Hence people are eating more not as a reward but because of the exercise itself physically making them hungrier. I haven't found this.

Psychology wise though, I don't want to 'blow it'. Forget about 'rewarding'. Plus food is no longer a reward for me.


Becky Quilts
01-21-2014, 02:15 PM
The truth is, it depends.

For example, it has been scientifically proven that swimming can increase appetite.
The cold water temperature stimulated post-exercise energy intake with the cold condition resulting in 44% more calories consumed than the neutral water conditions and 41% more than the resting conditions.
http://www.burnthefatinnercircle.com/members/341.cfm
Swimming in particular is known to stimulate a compensatory appetite.

Other movement (walking, running) -my guess is that it varies by individual. It's like breast feeding - some can BF and have the weight drop off easily. For me, my appetite made up the difference and I didn't lose from breastfeeding alone.

Running, I find myself again compensating rather well if left to my own devices. Your own mileage may vary. But I am not alone:
According to research presented at the American College of Sports Medicine this year, you may actually gain weight—especially if you’re a woman—training for a marathon.
http://www.appforhealth.com/2011/09/marathon-running-no-fast-track-to-thin/
In the 3-month study, researchers put 64 individuals on a marathon training program, 78% experienced no change in body weight, 11% lost weight and 11% gained weight. However, among those who gained weight, almost all were women.

So, if you want to lose weight, it goes back to counting (calories, points, carbs, whatever works for you). It's hard to out-train a bad diet.

diamondgeog
01-21-2014, 02:22 PM
I guess it does vary. Plenty of people conquer their weight problems with exercise and in particular running to be a big part of it.

I know that quote is popular, you can't out train a bad diet. I never understood the point of it quite. Of course it is true. But how many people go, yeah I'm working out, I am going to eat garbage because I can with all these calories burned? Does that occur to many people in real life?

I also think you need to see if a study applied to you. How many of those marathon runners were 285 like I was? Sure there can be diminishing returns. But I was a couch potato who could not run 30 seconds. Now I can run 30 minutes. It has been tranformative probably literally from my cellular level all the way up.

I don't think the majority of people who run are marathoners. And certainly people needing to loose around 100lbs or so like me probably loose most of it at 5K to 10K distances.

I can't see 0.000001% of 100 lb overweight formally sedentary people gaining weight if they could somehow train for a marathon.

shr1nk1ngme
01-21-2014, 02:52 PM
I always add exercise in little bits as I start out and then as I get closer to my goal I increase the intensity of my exercise. I find that until I get a handle on my eating, because of blood-sugar fluctuations, exercise DOES make me more hungry. But once I am well-established in my dietary discipline and my blood sugar is well-regulated, then exercise is less of a challenge to my hunger stimulus.

Also the type of exercise makes a huge difference. I tend toward moderate aerobic activity and weight training. I have never been much of a runner. I am sure the nutritional approach is quite different for different exercise approaches.

underanalysis
01-21-2014, 03:01 PM
Yeah, if I hit the treadmill when I'm hungry, it actually helps me suppress my hunger until some time after my workout, and even then I'm not famished.

But when I was a kid I lived on a river that happens to be the second-coldest river in the state. My only real exercise growing up was swimming in that river, which was great, but after a half hour or so in the frigid water, I was starving as soon as I got out, even if I'd just eaten before I jumped in. So what Becky posted echoes my experience with it pretty well.

Mad Donnelly
01-21-2014, 03:05 PM
But I was a couch potato who could not run 30 seconds. Now I can run 30 minutes. It has been tranformative probably literally from my cellular level all the way up.
How long did it take for you to be able to run 30 minutes? Also, you are low carb, right? So are you in ketosis.

I am trying right now to wrap my head around that exercise on a ketoadaptive diet means your body is using fat as fuel so that what you eat either before or after exercise is not as important.

I used to think that exercise made me hungrier, but I don't think I've ever done low carb AND exercised a lot before. I was still trying to slog through what advice well-meaning trainers but essentially WRONG were telling me. You know, complex carbs, low fat, blah, blah, blah. All the things that leave me famished. So, of course, once your body burns through the glycogen and has not yet turned over to your fat stores as a fuel, you're going to feel hungry. I am not finding that now, tho, that I'm on low carb and running/walking.

diamondgeog
01-21-2014, 03:35 PM
I have lowered my carbs, I don't eat pasta or bread anymore. But I am probably eating more veggies now. I am limiting fruit though. So I don't have many 'junk' or as many grain carbs (I still eat corn tortilla chips with quac). Really doubt I am in ketosis. I never tried to follow Atkins.

I am using a C25K program. I had a calf injury so I repeated weeks. And I was repeating weeks anyway. I started in August in the 260s or low 270s. I am just now hitting 30 mins. It is supposed to be an 8 week program, but I found repeating weeks helpful.

And after the calf injury (from tennis not running) which was in October I went back to week 2. Doctors said don't run for at least a month, so that was 4 weeks no running. Then we traveled over the holidays. I guess the basic point is C25K programs do a great job of easing you into running more and more, especially if you repeat weeks.

Becky Quilts
01-21-2014, 04:11 PM
I know that quote is popular, you can't out train a bad diet. I never understood the point of it quite. Of course it is true. But how many people go, yeah I'm working out, I am going to eat garbage because I can with all these calories burned? Does that occur to many people in real life?

Sorry didn't mean to be a debbie downer! I just don't want people to be misinformed. Yes, I know a lot of people that have the attitude, I ran x or I worked out for xx and now I can have this 600 calorie recovery shake (totally burying their efforts). I suppose it depends on who you're around. A lot of people overestimate how much they burn.

Be proud of your running, it takes a lot of perseverance to get to 30 min!

amandie
01-21-2014, 05:05 PM
Sorry didn't mean to be a debbie downer! I just don't want people to be misinformed. Yes, I know a lot of people that have the attitude, I ran x or I worked out for xx and now I can have this 600 calorie recovery shake (totally burying their efforts). I suppose it depends on who you're around. A lot of people overestimate how much they burn.

Be proud of your running, it takes a lot of perseverance to get to 30 min!

I totally agree with this. I do know a few people including myself who have given themselves permission to have whatever just because we did this and that as well as overestimated calories burned. Once I got into calorie counting and learning all about it, man it opened my eyes! No more of that!

fadedbluejeans
01-21-2014, 05:49 PM
Throwing in my 2 cents...
diamondgeog and I seem to be pretty similar. I have found that exercise, running in particular, does NOT increase my appetite (I too recently started a c25k program). Eating starchy bready grainy things increases my appetite. I eat carbs, but severely restrict those that come from bread, pasta, cookies, cakes, candy etc. I don't reward myself with food - I'm not saying I never eat something starchy sugary, whatever - I'm saying I don't call it a "treat" and I don't tell myself it is a reward. It is just less than optimal food that I ate for whatever reason.
On the other hand, I know plenty of people who do get hungry after exercise, and/or use their exercise as an excuse to reward themselves with no so good for them food. I don't think that is unusual.
Personally, I think people are kind of like NASCAR vehicles - all basically stock, but some run faster than others based on a myriad of factors, and there is no one size fits all diet and exercise plan.

diamondgeog
01-23-2014, 05:46 PM
I think we are talking about different things here. If people want to eat more after they exercise for whatever reason that is one thing.

But I think there is a popular notion that exercising will make you eat more regardless of intent or wanting to reward or not. I haven't found that with me and I am exercising much more regularly and longer than ever before. It was speaking to that. For most they don't get hungrier.

TooWicky
01-24-2014, 01:55 AM
Chiming in to contribute that I was a serious, year-round competitive swimmer for years and you can't even imagine how hungry that sport makes you - I mean, it's like massive hunger pangs after practices (we swam twice per day every single day all year-round with meets every weekend day and night.) We were all basically famished all the time and ate huge amounts of food, whether we were male, female, short, tall, young, old(er,) probably in the thousands of calories per day. I know of no other usual sport that even compares as far as stimulating appetite. I would wager this is a well-known phenomenon when it comes to competitive swimming specifically.

kaplods
01-24-2014, 04:06 AM
When I read that this is a review of previous research (not "new" research) and the reviewers say they found "no consistent and compelling evidence," that leads me to believe that the results of the research were inconsistent individually or as a whole.

That is some studies may have found increases in calories, others may have found decreases, others may have found no effects, or even within a study, the average effect was negligible, but individual results varied.

In other words a more truthful response may have been sometimes yes, sometimed no, or even "we have no blipping clue."


I know from personal experience that water exercise does make me incredibly hungry, but I can overcome/compensate for this effect by taking a nap rather than eating after a swim.

I didn't discover this on my own, but rather it was enforced by my mother when I was a young (obese) child. When I came home hungry from swimming lessons, my mother would tell me I wasn't hungry, I was tired and would make me take a nap instead of being allowed to binge.

It felt very unfair at the time, but I did learn that I would wake up from the nap hungry, but not as hungry as before the nap.

Outdoor exercise in cold weather does the same thing (with my arthritis and fibro, I don't do much cold weather, outdoor exercise, so this particular issue really doesn't really come up anymore).

I do still swim though, and sitting in the hot tub afterward also seems to help reduce post-swim hunger (I may or may not still need a nap).

I think the best assumption we all can make is that we need to be aware of, and prepared for the possibility of post-workout hunger, and deal with it (should it occur) when/if it happens.

Wannabeskinny
01-24-2014, 09:52 AM
The truth is, it depends.

It's like breast feeding - some can BF and have the weight drop off easily. For me, my appetite made up the difference and I didn't lose from breastfeeding alone.



I get very hungry when I do vigorous exercise.

I actually blame BF for my weight gain. I was so rabidly hungry while BF for 1.5yrs that I would wake up in the middle of the night craving cookies. I never had a sweet tooth before BF, and so that's new to me. I truly understand obesity now that I fight that sweet tooth. It is soo soooooooo hard to avoid sugar cravings. I can imagine it's quite similar to narcotics.

shr1nk1ngme
01-24-2014, 10:48 AM
Sorry didn't mean to be a debbie downer! I just don't want people to be misinformed. Yes, I know a lot of people that have the attitude, I ran x or I worked out for xx and now I can have this 600 calorie recovery shake (totally burying their efforts). I suppose it depends on who you're around. A lot of people overestimate how much they burn.


Yes, this is definitely a problem for a lot of people. I never eat back my calories, either deliberately or through lenience with myself because I "deserve" it. Because I deserve an occasional treat, but I also deserve to become fit and lean ~ and that's more important to me than the temporary gratification of compensatory eating.

That said, I do drink a protein shake after my workout, but it's a low-carb protein powder mixed with unsweetened almond milk and its purpose is to rebuild the muscles properly so I can get leaner and stronger. I do not drink it for its caloric content or even its flavor (though it's delicious). It's about 245 calories and I budget it into my total calories. My caloric allowance number does not change whether I exercise or not.